A&P How to prevent over exposure

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by G-man, May 3, 2008.

  1. G-man

    G-man Well-Known Member

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    I am wondering how to prevent over exposure in my pictures. I recently bought a Canon A720 IS as a point & shoot to replace my old one that got stolen. I've noticed that a lot of my pics are getting over exposed like this one:

    [​IMG]

    With my old P&S (Kodak DX 7630) this hardly ever occurred. I've tried messing around with all the settings on it and it has different modes (beach, night, landscape, snow, etc.) that i've tried using but none of them seem to help. Just wondering if anyone else had experienced a problem like this before.
     
  2. ace3

    ace3 mouthify my wang.

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    focus on the top part of the image (where the sun is bright), hold the shutter button down halfway, then compose your shot ... see what happens then?
     
  3. kristin

    kristin my dog > *

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    ^ Was going to say the same thing
     
  4. planb

    planb itches in my teeth

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    look in your manual and see if it has a AE lock button? (auto exposure lock)
     
  5. G-man

    G-man Well-Known Member

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    I'll try that. You mean like for the pic above to focus on the bright area in the top left then press the button half way then move the center to the position I want?
     
  6. G-man

    G-man Well-Known Member

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    yes it does have one
     
  7. Dwight Schrute

    Dwight Schrute New Member

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    There is too much dynamic range in that scene to capture in one photo. You will either have blown highlights or detail lost in the shadows. Your camera chose to have blown highlights to keep everything else properly exposed.

    If you wanted the opposite effect, do as others suggested and meter on the sky, recompose, and shoot.
     
  8. SkyAce2004

    SkyAce2004 New Member

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    [​IMG]
    :dunno:

    but yeah, as someone else mentioned. there is just too much dynamic range going on in that picture. from the bright ass sunlight at the top do the dark shadows at the bottom. you could have waiting for a cloud to come along to cover the sun a bit, or waited for the sun to go down more so the top of the ledge isnt as blown out.
     
  9. ///Mik3

    ///Mik3 New Member

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    use exposure compensation and learn to use your histogram.
     
  10. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    For scenes like that sometimes I let the camera meter to get my initial values, then switch to manual and compensate... Or just leave it in manual and and watch the camera's exposure meter as I reach the desired exposure. Normally when the camera's exposure is not acceptable it means the exposure I'm going for is in excess of 2 stops above or below what the camera thinks is normal.
     
  11. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    why?
     
  12. planb

    planb itches in my teeth

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    dudeman is using a canon a720. a sub $200 point and shoot.
     
  13. SkyAce2004

    SkyAce2004 New Member

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    i was insanely bored.
     
  14. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Don't the point and shoots still have an toggable exposure meter at the bottom of the LCD screen?

    I know my old S50 did.
     
  15. G-man

    G-man Well-Known Member

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    Looks like the camera only has 3 preset metering modes that i can switch between: Evaluative, Center Weighted Average and Spot while in manual mode. I can also adjust to different white balance values. I wonder if that might help any.
     
  16. G-man

    G-man Well-Known Member

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    Actually it looks like it has an adjustable Exposure Compensation setting. Guess I'll play around with it next time I take some pics.
     
  17. nine

    nine OT Supporter

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    white balance wont help you here brotographer
     
  18. CornUponCob

    CornUponCob New Member

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    Yeah, fart around with that a lot. Over time you'll start to learn what the camera will meter. In the event that I'm shooting Av I can fairly quickly identify scenes that the camera will under or over exposure... you will be able to as well.
     
  19. Jhegro

    Jhegro wtf is a jhegro?

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    this is one instance where using HDR would not only be useful, but necessary.
     
  20. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Exactly.

    To further simplify.

    Your eye can see details in a scene with a range of bright to dark areas of about 10-12 f/stops. (go to photography101 sticky to learn about f/stops).

    Your camera, on the other hand, can only "see" a range of about 6 f/stops before you lose detail in the picture. You have a choice when you take the picture of what brightness range you want the camera to capture...the bright part or the darker part. You chose the darker part, that's why the brighter part is overexposed.

    There are ways around this, including HDR but a simple graduated ND filter would help to darken the bright areas and therefore help to bring the "bright" part down to a level where the camera can "see" it.
     

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