How To Perform Squats Correctly

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by METALLlC BLUE, Jul 3, 2002.

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  1. Prepare using a rack with barbell situated at upper chest height, position bar on the back of the shoulders across your traps (Not your Neck) by coming up underneath and standing under the bar. Hold the bar with your hands slightly more then shoulder length apart to keep the bar balanced. Keep head forward, back straight and feet flat on the floor and positioned ahead with a slight outward angle as the below picture indicates. You're feet should be slightly more then shoulders length apart as well as your hands which hold the bar; equal distribution of weight throughout forefoot and heel is crucial. Dismount bar from rack and begin descent controlled and even.

    Execution:

    Descend until thighs are parallel to the floor at a 90 degree angle - toes should appear to line up with the knee before ascending back up explosively. The knees should not go past the toes when the thighs are parallel to the floor. Extend knees and hips until legs are straight. Return and repeat.

    This picture from the side indicates correct form - including foot position, knee position, parrallel positioning, and head/shoulder arrangements.

    [​IMG]

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2002
  2. PatrickB

    PatrickB I bring you the pancake bunny!

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    I dont know if you meant something else by this but your feet should be pointing slightly outward. They should never point straight ahead. This way the quadriceps can contract more efficiently.

    And be sure not to have a very wide stance. When you do your adductors will assist the quads which can stress the medial collateral ligament, cause abnormal cartilage loading or improper patellar tracking. Same reason for making sure your knees do not extend beyond your feet during the descent phase because of the greater shearing force on the patellar tendon and ligament. The safest way to squat is to use an athletic stance to put your feet in a position where they can generate the greatest opposing force to the weight. This is usually a little more than shoulder width.

    I could probably make up an article a few pages long on how to properly squat and the different types of squats( Powerlifting squats, olympic Squats, Athlete squats, Safety squats, Manta Ray squats, Twisting squats, lunge squats, and about 10 more) if anyone is interested.
     
  3. Fatghost28

    Fatghost28 Guest

    Ceaze: Whats the best form for strength training?
     
  4. PatrickB

    PatrickB I bring you the pancake bunny!

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    Wow I don't agree with most of what that article is about. Some of my reasons are stated in my post above. Advocating a wide stance as in Powerlifting or Olympic squat is not what you should be doing.
    You should be using an Athletic Squat base.

    I dont know him and this is the only article I have read by him but from what I have seen it doesnt sound like he has any understanding of kinesiology or biomechanics.
     
  5. Patrick - You're correct in foot position. I didn't re-correct that upon editing to specify. It's correct now. This article is for general squat.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 3, 2002
  6. Sakino

    Sakino I Live In A Giant Bucket

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    Today at the gym I tried the squats this way, with light weights. Major improvement. Talk with a guy that was doing them also, he prefers to put plates under the back of his feet. and let the toes hit the ground. I tried it again, all the pressure still goes to the back of your feet. What is your idea on this?
     
  7. Josh as you push up your heel is supporting your body in a straight line - the linear way the human body is designed accounts for this. It's like a straight pole - if you place weight at the top the most weight will be accounted for in a straight line at the bottom of the pole. Try leaning a tiny bit forwards (as long as you're balanced) and then push up. Try light weights at first to ensure you can perform the movement. Some people have difficulty with balance until they get used to a method that works for them - practice makes perfect.
     
  8. Sakino

    Sakino I Live In A Giant Bucket

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    Thanks Mike, hopefully I will get it right this Sunday. Then let the fun start.
     
  9. gsxtasyd

    gsxtasyd Lift Big........Eat Big........Sleep Big........GE

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    don't put plates under your feet. ever.
     
  10. I agree with that.
     
  11. Filmboy44

    Filmboy44 Guest

    so 90º huh? I have been telling and going past that point. I like the stretch on the hammy's...

    :dunno:
     
  12. National Bodybuilding & Fitness Magazine infromation on Squat: - CLICK HERE

     
  13. Fatghost28

    Fatghost28 Guest

    I go to *just* below parallel...about 85 degrees.

    but Squats are the BEST. EXERCISE. EVAR. :bigthumb:
     
  14. I haven't trained in years - I would probably look like a tool when I first begin. I can't wait until I'm well enough - right now I'm stretching a lot. I know the material, and I have a great deal of experience, but it's been quite awhile since I've done actual movements on my own.

    I'm thinking about doing Yoga and some other things before I move on to weights, but either way I'll keep up with it consistently. I'm really impressed with my improvement in stretching since I began a few weeks ago. I'm almost able to touch my toes without difficulty (while sitting of course). My legs feel much better, much stronger, and yet much more flexible then they did.

    I'm very happy - and I hope it continues. Today however is a downday. I'm not feeling well.
     
  15. Fatghost28

    Fatghost28 Guest

    I hope you feel better soon :sadwavey:


    But just jump back into squats, do the empty bar and rep out once you're up to it.
     
  16. Thanks - it really is tough. My doctor just prescribed new medication and I'm really frustrated with it. One of them is Plaquenil an Immunosuppresant medication. I have not been using it, and need to discuss it further with him. I am incredibly against using immunosuppressant medication unless it's an emergency. The other Antibiotic he prescribed I've been using - Biaxin (Clarithromycin) a macrolide antibiotic to kill bacteria "inside" cells. The bacteria that causes Lyme lives in nerve tissue cells from my understanding - I think it can also be present in other cells as well, but I'm not quite sure.

    At any rate I really need to talk with this doctor. I'm very insecure about using that other med. I don't even like using antibiotics, but when combined with appropriate nutrition I can survive it. If I had my way I'd use holistic therapys, especially now that I know what I'm facing. It wouldn't be too tough to beat, but the doctor told me to wait. When he gives me the green light I'll unleash holy hell on this bacteria.

    I'm not happy about this medication, especially the Plaquenil. :(
     
  17. Fatghost28

    Fatghost28 Guest

    I'm not a fan of immunosuppresants either.

    Good luck
     
  18. Sonic

    Sonic Live every day to the fullest, for yesterday is go

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    :cool: I'm doing them correctly.:)
     
  19. How do you like doing them "correctly"? Do you feel comfortable, and have you made gains? (if you've been doing them correctly for awhile).
     
  20. I found out the medication is not immunosuppressant. It has been "listed" as one merely because it has mild anti-inflammatory functions when used on patients with Lupus and Arthritis. In actual tests, and patients with Lyme the therapy is at a much lower doseage, and will not suppress immunity at all. The purpose it's being used is because the Lyme Bacteria will hide in "acid" pockets inside nerve tissue cells and Biaxin (Clarithromycin) can't work in an acid environment. Plaquenil basically is the "key" to unlock the Biaxins ability to function in that environment and kill the Lyme Disease pathogen. It will have no-where to run, and no place to hide on this therapy.

    The old medication I was on (Tetracyline) is not good to use during the Summer because of sun light intensity, so this other regimen is used. Tetracycline can work in any environment including an Acid environment so that is why it works.

    So now I understand and have begun using the medication.

    I had no reactions at all and zero side effects on both meds. I'm doing just fine, and back on track.
     
  21. Guest

    Guest Guest

    I'm female and have strong leg muscles, but I find I have to limit my squat weight to 80lbs to be able to do the form correctly. For my weight/size, I should be at 100-120lbs...

    can you help me identify what muscles I should be focusing on when exploding upwards? Sometimes I bend my back forward and don't feel like I'm in the right positon and am using the wrong muscles...
     
  22. I can answer your question J-Dog, but Chad you'll need to ask someone else about that question. Maybe someone else knows how to do the specific squat your speaking of. I never used them. Surely you can find the solution online or through another member.

    J-Dog there is no specific weight you "should" be doing. The first lesson here is to never compare yourself to another when doing basic training. Second when performing the movement do you find your lower back leaning forward as if you're "bending over" to some degree. If you do - try to lean back so that your torso and head are perpendicular. You should be standing straight up. You may wish to lean back by 1 to 2 degrees to stabilize as I told Josh up above (Sakino).

    The muscles required to perform the Squat motion we've been talking about here is strong lower back, abdominals, and Buttocks muscles. These are the stabilizing muscles. You must have muscles strong enough to stablize the movement - else you risk leaning forward or have continuous problems with balance.

    My suggestion is to continue doing Squats at the weight which you find manageable and can still do the movement correctly. I also recommend performing some lower back movements, and abdominal strength training. The buttocks muscles or Glutes will be exercised during Hamstring training such as "hamstring curls". I'll assume you know these exercises.

    I'd like for someone to arrange a routine for you - I simply don't have time to list it now. Anyone willing to?
     
  23. Guest

    Guest Guest

    if someone's got the time and energy to post a w/o for me I'd be happy to pick it up... I already do an hour three times a week for weight training (chest/back, legs, arms/shoulders) but feel like I need to switch it up a little. i can provide my current w/o to anyone interested...
     
  24. Yes post it please. I'll get to it later, or someone else will help you.
     
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