A&P How to get the sky/foreground in an outdoor shot

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Milin, Jul 26, 2005.

  1. Milin

    Milin It's Terminal.

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    Hey all, I have done a lot of landscapey type work recently and even done some neat shots of cars or people outside, but I always seem to have the problem of exposing the sky and for the subject in the foreground.

    Anyone have any tips or tricks on getting the sky to come out nice and blue with all the clouds and whatnot and not underexposing the subject? I usually shoot my outdoor shots in the morning before noon and use around f18-f20 on a 17-40 f4L (canon 300d)

    I have a 550ex flash and have been really thinking about using a fill flash to get the right effect.

    Anyone have tips or links on mastering how to use a flash? I haven't gotten the hang of using it yet.
     
  2. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    grad nd filters, reflectors, fill flash, timing
     
  3. wtfmate

    wtfmate OT Resident mafia insider

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    bracketing?
     
  4. CRC

    CRC New Member

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    werd. And sometimes when i shoot in RAW, I can 'bracket' from a single exposure :noes:
     
  5. Milin

    Milin It's Terminal.

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    :coolugh:
     
  6. wtfmate

    wtfmate OT Resident mafia insider

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    :bigthumb:
     
  7. twinturboteddy

    twinturboteddy Bling Bling!

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    I recently bought a heap of filters and was really amazed at how much blue came out of the sky and how much improved contrast I got from buildings in the foreground. Try a circular polarizer filter. I'm at work but I'll post a shot I took while I was in Dallas this pass weekend.
     
  8. twinturboteddy

    twinturboteddy Bling Bling!

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  9. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    meter for the deep blue part of the sky, set the flash to ettl, camera to M and go

    oh and diffuse the flash with something
     
  10. tenplanescrashing

    tenplanescrashing Active Member

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    what are you using the flash for? If the distance you want to fill is further than 10 ft, your flash will be ineffective, especially if you don't shoot in Manual mode.

    Correct me if im wrong...
     
  11. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    flashpower depends on the flash's guide number, the aperature,the power relative to the abient light, your iso etc
     
    Last edited: Jul 27, 2005
  12. tenplanescrashing

    tenplanescrashing Active Member

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    sorry, I read the original post wrong and assumed he wanted something like the Dallas pictures posted above.
     
  13. sony

    sony Active Member

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    You can either do two exposures, one exposing for the foreground and the second exposing for the background (or vice versa) or expose for the background and then use a flash to compensate for the foreground (assuming the background is a lot brighter than the foreground).
     
  14. Milin

    Milin It's Terminal.

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    this would be good when doing a car with a wide angle lens (so the subject is close by) like my 17-40 f4L?

    fill in the car with my diffused flash and expose for the sky.

    I think that might work. I'll try it once this cursed rain lets up!
     
  15. FryingPan

    FryingPan Certified Thread Killer

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    [​IMG]

    Linear polarizer used here. . . Metered off of the sand near the water's edge.
     
  16. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    A graduated nd (neutral density) filter is the best way to go. It's a filter that is dark grey at the top and fades to clear in the middle. The filter is square, not round, so you need a matte box to hold it in front of the lens. The dark grey portion covers the sky, reducing the effective brightness. You can stack ND filters for greater effect or use graduated color filters to simulate sunset.

    A polarizer filter works well too but not at all angles or lighting conditions.
     

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