A&P How much do you rely on the histogram while shooting?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Nullius, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. Nullius

    Nullius New Member

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    just bought a digital photography specific book and it's taught me a few things i didn't already know, such as how to read the contrast histogram that the camera outputs.

    question is what should an ideal one look like, how can i use it to my advantage as far as composition goes, and should i even rely on it?

    i shot my GF's grandparents 65th anniversary party and used the histogram in review to change up my exposure and it improved the photo quality greatly, should i rely on it so heavily or no?
     
  2. Nullius

    Nullius New Member

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    oh and what about the RBG histogram? rely on that much or no? no clue how that one's supposed to be read at all, book didn't say.
     
  3. Crossett

    Crossett New Member

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    histogram > ttl meter, use it a lot.
     
  4. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    my display is always set to bring up the histogram. sadly my camera doesnt have RGB histograms.
     
  5. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    the thing about the histogram is that you need to know what you are looking at depending on the scene.
     
  6. Airpoppoff

    Airpoppoff Vodka > Racing F1

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    mine brings up histogram, the rgb histogram takes a little longer to come up, and its only one over if i need it
     
  7. SkyAce2004

    SkyAce2004 New Member

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    i dont get how to read histograms things
     
  8. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    there is no one correct histrogram for every image. all a histogram does is graph the number of pixels based on brightness.

    now with that said; i could have a perfectly exposed car while underexposing the back and foreground.

    it takes some practice to learn what that histogram looks like.
     
  9. SkyAce2004

    SkyAce2004 New Member

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    i know what it looks like, i just dont know what im looking at :sadwavey:
     
  10. 19Godfather86

    19Godfather86 New Member

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    I can't read RGB historgrams very well, but the basic brightness one can give me a decent idea of the overall lighting in the scene.
     
  11. MrBrotato

    MrBrotato New Member

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    My camera has an LCD display that actually just shows me the pic, it's pretty cool.
     
  12. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    :gtfo:
     
  13. anthem404

    anthem404 not my cup of mud

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    I actually can't think of a time where I've used the histogram...

    I just guess the exposure settings and fire off a few test shots and fine tune the settings as I go.

    I'm to the point where I can guess the exposure without having to change it afterwards... Every 2 shots of 15 I guess on I'll get wrong.

    I understand how to read it, but I don't see how it could be helpful.
     
  14. Burmonster

    Burmonster OT Supporter

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    I would like to discuss this topic but I am, frankly, too wierded out by your av



    :rofl:
     
  15. Hippy

    Hippy New Member

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    this is a good photographic technique.
     
  16. DXC

    DXC New Member

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    " there is no one correct histrogram for every image. all a histogram does is graph the number of pixels based on brightness."

    i agree ... to me it is a visual aid to help more rapidly determine what is going on in a pix . it helps me to better develop a "feel" for what the parameters i have selected/work with are (pretty much) going to do based on the past .
     
  17. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    I use it for the first few shots, adjust my settings, and not bother looking at it again unless I feel as though my settings are off. With enough experience, you can look at a scene and get the settings pretty close to what they should be. When I do get the shot wrong, shooting in RAW allows enough flexibility to fix the exposure & white balance.
     
  18. Crossett

    Crossett New Member

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    The histogram is a graph of luminosity in your image. Every point is represented from 0 to 255 (pure black to pure white). If you are shooting RAW it actually based on a small JPEG image, not the RAW information.

    In a properly exposed image the histogram should look like a bell curve. It should extend all the way to each end, but not appear to be cut off. If one end is cut off that means that you have lost either highlight or shadow detail depending on which end is clipped. If the graph stops before it gets to an end, it means that the image is either over or under exposed, again depending on which end has no information.

    This is more accurate than TTL meters, and should be used if you have the time for it. I hope this makes sense, i'm at work or I would post pics.
     
  19. anthem404

    anthem404 not my cup of mud

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    Yeah, I can see how it's helpful now. I just don't see myself using it in the future. When doing football for example, I would properly expose the player, but the background would be pure black or close to it (not an arena). Wouldn't the histogram show that as an incorrect exposure (too much loss in shadow detail)?
     
  20. Crossett

    Crossett New Member

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    yes
     
  21. Nullius

    Nullius New Member

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    this is how i used it. once i was indoors i knew the lighting would change very little, and for some really annoying reason they were against turning on any lamps. i had to shoot the whole party on iso 1600 to get the histogram to look anything close to normal. i knew two settings, one for near the window and one for the kitchen, depending on the direction i would over expose it a lot or a little.

    i wasn't aware that it should look like a bell curve though, i was just aiming at filling out the whole graph with no gaps or spikes on the edges. now i have something more accurate to look at, thanks for the info.

    if anyone has any idea how to read the RBG graph i'd love to hear it, as well as any techniques using either one of them. good input so far
     
  22. Tedrzz

    Tedrzz New Member

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    i never ever use my histogram
     
  23. BeachBoy

    BeachBoy New Member

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    I usually set my camera to display highlights after a shot, so I can see if it's over exposed.

    I'll chekc the histogram sometimes, but rarely
     

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