GUN How long would it take for a progressive reloading setup would pay for itself?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by xpinchx, Jan 25, 2008.

  1. xpinchx

    xpinchx hes got a nice cock, on the thin side but its stil

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    Starting from scratch with no materials and minimal tools. I know it depends on what kind of ammo is normally bought, but in ball-park terms, how many reloaded rounds of .223 would make the reloading setup pay for itself?

    In case you're wondering I'm trying to justify the cost of a reloading setup. :o
     
  2. skeletor25rs

    skeletor25rs Yetis & Deer

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    Reloading is a hobby that will last you a lifetime, do you try and make your other hobbies pay for themselves? :mamoru:
     
  3. johnson

    johnson New Member

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    In my eyes it's more like an investment.
     
  4. [DWI]

    [DWI] Master of Nothing

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    Its not like he's taking up model rocketry or something. Yes its a hobby or an extension of the firearms hobby (which will never pay for itself), but it produces an item he would be using anyways, probably for cheaper than he can buy it. It will reduce costs.

    He's simply asking, how much cheaper is it to produce your own ammo, than to buy it and how much does the necessary equipment cost.
     
  5. thedude11

    thedude11 New Member

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    I have an awesome Excel spreadsheet that calculates cost per round, how much material you will need per batch, and payback time.

    I zipped it up and uploaded it. Download it here:

    http://www.megaupload.com/?d=EMTQ1S3C

    You will have to do some researching yourself to figure out the costs of the powder, primers, bullets, press, etc... Only you can do that though so don't bitch. ;) Go to midwayusa.com to get a good idea of how much to spend on those components if you don't know where to find prices.
     
  6. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Depending on how much you shoot. mine paid for it self in the first two months. Everything after that puts me in positive figures. I have never regretted buying my dillon. I wouldn't be able to shoot as often as I do without it.

    And aside from that, I find it very thereuputic and I really enjoy doing it. I go into my shop, make some bullets while listening to music. It's something I can do when I'm not on the range.

    It's almost like owning a home vs. renting. If all you need is a bed to sleep in, don't have any kids, spouse, have a lot of nice stuff or much of anything and don't spend any time at home and don't pay alot now. Just rent a room or apartment. But if you aspire for more someday and you want to see the monthly investment of payments every month amount to something, a home is a very worthy investment.

    (theory: reloading equipment makes sense for the serious shooter, that's vested in his hobby outside of "collecting". If you only have a gun or two, and don't shoot too often, you may not yeild a high return on investment or may take some time before you do. )
     
  7. skeletor25rs

    skeletor25rs Yetis & Deer

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    Gee,thanks for the in depth explanation:rolleyes:
    I've actually started getting my loading equipment together. I'll just be looking for increased accuracy, so mine will take a very long time to pay for itself since I don't shoot thousands of rounds a year.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2008

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