A&P How do you take long exposure shots during the day?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Danno, Feb 26, 2004.

  1. Danno

    Danno Bronx Poodle OT Supporter

    Joined:
    May 22, 2003
    Messages:
    64,917
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Indiana
    Every time I've tried taking a long exposure shot during the day the whole shot is white. Is there a way to take a long exposure (2-15 sec.) shot without it getting whited out?
     
  2. Vilnius

    Vilnius Bruised, battered, and scarred but hard. OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Messages:
    16,211
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Toronto
    - Neutral Density Filters, and/or
    - stop right down. (use like f/22 or whatever the smallest aperture your cam/lens supports)
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2004
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,131
    Likes Received:
    89
    Location:
    east coast
    I guess I have to first ask what it is your taking a photo of that you want a long exposure? I assume that it's moving water or moving cars. The best thing to do is to shoot in dim light to begin with, i.e. early morning or late in the day. Failing that, try for a cloudy day. Sunlight is just going to add too much light to really get a long exposure without using extreme measures.

    It also helps to use the slowest film you can get. Kodachrome has a speed of ASA 64. In b/w film, Panatomic X (if you can find it) has a speed of ASA 32.

    You said that your shots all turn out white. That's because you're totally overexposing the shot. You have to start with a correct exposure in the first place and work from there. Lets assume that your camera meter says that f/8 @ 1/60 sec. will give you a correct exposure for your photo. If you stop your lens down to it's maximum of f/22, you need to increase your exposure time to compensate. (f/22 is two stops closed from f/8) So instead of shooting at 1/60 sec, you shoot at 1/15 sec. (1/15 is two shutter speeds slower than 1/60). Next you can cut the light hitting the film even more by adding neutral density filters.

    A #9 ND filter cuts your exposue by 3 f/stops, or in other words, allows you to increase your exposure time from 1/15 sec to 1/2 second. Keep in mind that you can stack ND filters to add even more exposure time.

    Always use a tripod and a timer or cable release so you don't accidently move or shake the camera.

    Again, the best way to get good time exposure shots is to shoot in low light in the first place.
     
  4. Vilnius

    Vilnius Bruised, battered, and scarred but hard. OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2003
    Messages:
    16,211
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    Toronto
    Good Answer!

    Consider my advice the concise version :hs:
     
  5. Blindsight

    Blindsight Guest

    jcolman are you a professional photog or just a really serious amatuer? You sure know a hell of alot :eek3:
     
  6. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Aug 19, 2002
    Messages:
    43,131
    Likes Received:
    89
    Location:
    east coast
    Thanks. I am a professional. I have a degree in photography and cinematography. I was a newspaper photographer for three years, a studio photographer/cinemtographer/editor, a television cameraman, and for the past 16 years I've been a video producer/director.

    While I don't take many still photos anymore, I enjoy teaching others. Someday I'll scan a few examples of my work and post them for you guys. In the meantime, you can see examples of my video work at my companies web site. www.horizonvp.com
     
  7. Blindsight

    Blindsight Guest

    :cool: Nice company to boot
     

Share This Page