How do you learn how to ride?

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by Kroze, Feb 15, 2006.

  1. Kroze

    Kroze Active Member

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    What?
    I want to get a bike but I don't know how to ride it. I'm thinking of buying an older bike and have it sent/delivery to my house and i'll learn it on my street. The clutch is the left handle, gas is on the right, and the shifter is universal right? (1st gear is down, 2nd gear and up- press up.) what/where/how do you get neutral?
     
  2. wiredout46

    wiredout46 臭黑鬼 OT Supporter

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    msf. WELL worth the money.
     
  3. 2K-2.5RS

    2K-2.5RS No caffeine - No function

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    Don't even buy a bike until you attand.
     
  4. trez157

    trez157 You can't trust freedom when it's not in your hand

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    I learned because my homeboy let me use his bike. It's my bike now tho, I bought it off of him, and it is a piece of shit. But it gets me around, so that's all that matters. Anyway, he took me to an empty parking lot and let me have a go. I wouldn't recommend going on the street with it, just do it in an empty lot, because you dont want to hit someones car and not have insurance.
     
  5. Luffy

    Luffy | Anime Crew | Gear Second |

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    Msf

    *edit*
    took the time to read your post... PLEASE, research and take the MSF course. Worth every penny.
     
    Last edited: Feb 16, 2006
  6. Dranian

    Dranian (..)

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    neutral is halfway between 1st and second gear since you asked (but you really don't use neutral that much while riding), but take the MSF (motorcycle safety foundation) class they'll teach you all you need to know, i didn't know how to ride last december and then i took the MSF and bought a bike and i'm getting better every day.

    also buy gear before getting a bike. gear can get kinda expensive and this way you'll be a well dressed/safe motorcyclist on a bike you can afford.

    a good starter bike is a ninja 500r/ex500, thats what i got. not too much power for a beginner but faster than most cars and capable of going on the highway, lightweight, reliable, and holds its value well so you can resell it and move up to a faster bike in a year or two.

    Also i'd recommend doing some reading, the msf is not the end of your rider education and there are some good books that offer good advice to help you learn and help you stay safe. "how to ride a motorcycle" by pat hahn is a pretty good book for beginners. Also "ride hard, ride smart" by the same author is pretty good.

    there are many places on the web that have a lot of good info too, check out beginnerbikers.org.
     
  7. Dranian

    Dranian (..)

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    oh yeah, since you're asking this, i assume you don't know much about the MSF. go to http://www.msf-usa.org/ and look for a place that teaches the BRC(basic rider course) in your area. prices vary, but it shouldn't be much more than $250, no riding experience needed, they'll teach you riding strategies in a classroom and give you ample supervised practice on a bike, probably a 250cc engine. its a lot of fun and you'll learn a lot about how to ride and how to stay safe. classes are generally held on weekends, about 20 hours over 2 days and it'll get you through your first hundred(or so) shaky miles. you'll learn clutch control, tight turning, countersteering, stopping quickly, swerving, safety tips, preride check, and all sorts of stuff. i had a ton of fun at the class. also if you pass, many states exempt you from further testing to get your motorcycle endorsement at the dmv. and some shops give discounts to people who show an msf completion card.

    so take the msf class first, buy gear (at a minimum: HELMET, GLOVES, jacket, boots, pants), get a starter bike and a a couple books, then practice on the street in low traffic areas, then gradually start working up to busier streets, longer rides and eventually riding on the highway.
     
  8. Chiron

    Chiron New Member

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    You are required to have your own gear for the BRC. Some places may have a loaner or two in case you've forgoten something. Make sure the gear you end up buying offers you a very good degree of protection yet is COMFORTABLE at the same time. If its uncomfortable, you won't wear it. Also, don't sacrifice function over style.

    Now, don't gamble with your life and take the MSF course. You'll not only learn how to ride, but how to deal with riding on the streets. I've watched many a beginner go from not even knowing that the right handgrip is the throttle, to become a proficient motorcyclist whom is on their way to many enjoyable miles. After you take the course, practice what you were taught, and you will become a better rider.

    Cheers
     
  9. Junkie

    Junkie re-tarded OT Supporter

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    from their site: What should you bring the first day of the course? For the riding portion of the course, come dressed appropriately with:

    * long sleeve shirt or jacket
    * full-fingered gloves
    * sunglasses
    * long pants
    * boot or shoe that covers the ankle bone
    * rain gear in case of rain
    * drinking water and snacks

    Check with your training site to verify what you need. A riding helmet is usually supplied.

    doesn't sound like you need to bring all of your own gear, but if you're sure you are getting a bike you might as well. I am going to be taking the course and getting a KLR 650 in a month or so (yes its a 650, but its a thumper DS and therefore not very fast for one). if you are going to be doing around town stuff and are fairly tall, Dual Sports are nice because they are up high, have upright riding positions, and therefore let you see and be seen much better than being crouched over little sport bikes.
     
  10. s2k

    s2k OT Supporter

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    i learn from the msf course, they provide a bike for you to learn on, its a must!

    it also save you on insurance and you won't have to take the motorcycle skill test at the DOT

    i took mine in the 3 days weekend period (fri sat and sun), and in the middle of summer, i think i lost like 5 lbs after the weekend from being outside 8 hours a day with long sleeves, helmet and gloves....kinda fun though
     
  11. Frequency

    Frequency New Member

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    i took a tue thur tue thur class where tuesday was the classroom part and thursday was the riding day

    the first thursday it poured but it was about 70 degrees out
    the second thursday it was hot as all hell about 95 degrees
     
  12. Imagine

    Imagine New Member

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    Definately look into an MSF course. You'll be glad you did.
     
  13. V!

    V! New Member

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    I got on the bike at the dealership after i paid for it


    :confused:
     
  14. s2k

    s2k OT Supporter

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    i remember seeing a vid of some dude highsided right out of the dealership lot while his buddy recorded the whole thing
     
  15. Frequency

    Frequency New Member

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    i use to have that vid on my we server i'll look when i get to work
     
  16. Kroze

    Kroze Active Member

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    What?
    what's "highside"?
     
  17. Frequency

    Frequency New Member

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    Lowside laying the bike down with you int he seat
    highside crash where you and bike seperate before impact of ground
     
  18. Junkie

    Junkie re-tarded OT Supporter

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    you didn't need a licence or anything?
     
  19. Kroze

    Kroze Active Member

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    no you don't need a license to buy a bike. you do need a license to ride it though but the dealers don't give a cow. all they care is selling you a bike, having a license or not doesn't bother them.
     
  20. Akira

    Akira Coke > Pepsi

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    Take the MSF... it's a must!
     
  21. LocoStrange

    LocoStrange New Member

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    Im gonna take a MSF class (gonna register for beginning of summer or sometime when it should be sunny and hot. Helmet is shipping. Gloves and boots will be bought soon :x:
     
  22. V!

    V! New Member

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    Everyone is suggesting the MSF class, but i highly precaution you when you get out of it.

    There are lots of things not covered in the class that you need to know when riding.

    I would highly suggest that after exiting the MSF class, find somebody who has been riding for a long time and go out with them several times. Just watch what they do and try to match their movements and watch how they approach situations.

    Not everything is learned in the class, it's a great foundation, but you should that knowledge and learn from the pros/cons of the people around you.
     
  23. eivissu

    eivissu New Member

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    I agree.

    There are people who take MSF classes and actually do pass, but don't necessarily look like they can ride on the road without getting into something. What it says on paper doesn't necessarily equate to riding skill.

    Your class will probably have a few riders who have experience and are actually taking the class for the insurance benefit. They'll probably be more than happy to have an additional riding buddy like you.
     
  24. Esp69st

    Esp69st Who's talking about OIL... bitch you cooking

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    Msf...
     
  25. gotricesmurf

    gotricesmurf "Teh SMURFS"

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    i was planning on taking a MSF course this weekend.. but cant due to having to work on my car... plus my pops isnt to happy bout me wanting to start riding... although he wants a chopper...
     

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