SRS How do I find a major I want?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Sofa King, Nov 18, 2008.

  1. Sofa King

    Sofa King Guest

    This is probably the wrong forum, but I have no idea where to go for this...

    I'm in High School at the moment and I know I want to do something with the sciences, probably engineering. But I have no idea how to find out what field I'd want to go into. Any ideas on how to figure this out?

    I love computers & physics, etc. I'm not sure how to narrow things down though
     
  2. iwishyouwerebeer

    iwishyouwerebeer you shut your cunt Moderator

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    Most people who are in or have finished college will tell you they at least changed majors once, that's just the very important fact high school guidance counselors never tell you.

    Don't stess about finding your niche. Go with the flow. The unfortunate thing is the first 2 years are general ed classes as it is so it's hard to really figure out what you enjoy since the classes you do take for your major tend to be very basic.

    I went fom Psychology to Communications and even though I LOVED Psych I knew Communications was made for me and I'm happy I changed even 1.5 years later.

    Anyway, what you need to do first is speak to a counselor about your interests and reseach a little bit about possible majors at whatever university you will be attending. Once you get there your major will always have a few guidance counselors that you can speak to and plan out your classes with.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2008
  3. eljefedetonto

    eljefedetonto OT Supporter

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    :werd:

    unfortunately I went from journalism to diagnostic radiography, which tacked on two extra years of school since I had a bunch of extra science classes I needed.
     
  4. Viper

    Viper OT Supporter

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    Well, you kind of answered your own question. :rofl:

    Figure out which of those two things would make you happiest, and seek out a career within that field that you can live with. If you do your research a little bit (like checking out starting salaries, researching what sorts of job opportunities exist in the major you are thinking of, etc.) you greatly reduce the likelihood that you'll change majors.

    A lot of people just declare a major without doing the research first, and end up switching their major halfway through because of it (hence the reason why so many people change majors).

    So, if you put a lot of research into it, talk to a guidance counsellor, take online career tests (google them, there are hundreds of them out there), and make an informed decision, you'll be fine.
     
  5. eXyle

    eXyle ׂ

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    engineering and accounting undergraduate degrees are usually the only ones that translate into a career. most other undergraduate majors are "useless" as far as getting a job in the field of study. a graduate degree is usually required instead.

    with that said, unless you want a career in engineering or accounting or if you plan on going to graduate school, major in whatever interests you. people major in english and go to med school, or they major in philosophy and go to law school, etc.

    you can also go in as undeclared, work on completing your general ed requirements first and find an major that interests you that way. undergraduate study has a far greater impact on you as individual way beyond the degree you end up with. the "experience" will pay more dividends than the piece of paper you get. i don't mean in the way of partying either. 18-21 represents a large developmental learning stage in your life as far as maturing into an adult.

    a college degree isn't important to employers because of what you studied, but what it represents. you dedicated yourself to a field of study, showed committment, drive, developed interpersonal skills by interacting with professors and peers, etc. at least, in theory, that's what it represents, haha.

    don't get caught up in what major to take, the career opportunities are out there and money can be made regardless of the field of study. just keep an open mind and you'll find something that suits you. besides, if you major in something you enjoy, your chances of success are greatly improved, which in turn will improve your resume and/or graduate school application.
     

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