A&P How could i have fixed this pic. *Lotus Elise*

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by dmora, Dec 3, 2004.

  1. dmora

    dmora Guest

    [​IMG]

    If need be i can post a higher rez.
     
  2. MrBucket

    MrBucket OT Supporter

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    Maybe you could have used a graduated neutral density filter when you took it so that you could make the building not as blown out and get a better exposure on the car.
     
  3. widebaudi

    widebaudi New Member

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    too much sky for my liking and you could have used a little bit shorter shutter so that the lights dont get blown out as much.
     
  4. dmora

    dmora Guest

    yea, i knew the lights were going to get blown out, but i wanted to get the yellow of the car in. Plus it was pretty much pitch black.

    D70 + kit lens
    I shot 13 sec at f3.5
    ISO 200 :uh:
    17mm wide open
    Auto white balance, no gray card.
     
  5. dmora

    dmora Guest

    hmm... link to some examples on BnH?
     
  6. weezerfan

    weezerfan New Member

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    you could exposed the elise in one pic, then exposed the building in another, then layered them on top of each other in photoshop, then using the history brush, brush away till it looks believable
     
  7. sony

    sony Active Member

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    Even if you shot raw, some of the burn spots have unrecoverable data loss (the levels clipped too badly to even repair in raw by shifting the curve). Don't leave the lights on as long. Try painting the car w/ a flashlight. Don't drag the shutter so long. Try stopping down a bit.

    The biggest problem you had was that you overexposed the picture too much. In this case, it would've been better to underexpose a bit and then combine two exposures using raw (pushing one up) and then combining it with the underexposed one to preserve all of the highlights.
     
  8. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    You must have shot this on a tripod, so doing bracketed or multiple exposures could have been done.

    You have two surfaces you want to be exposed properly, and because the car appears to be backlit, there will be a huge difference in overall lighting

    Make one exposure for the lights in the background.
    - For this exposure, you could meter off of the lights in the background. If they were pure white, dial in +2.0-2.7 stops of exposure compensation. Shoot it and check the historgram using image review. The highlights should be weighted towards the right edge of the histogram box, but not clipped. As you know, the clipping of these highlight values leads to 'blown out' results.

    Make one exposure for the car in the foreground.
    - Meter off of the car's body. Since the car is a bright yellow, Exposure compensation should be around +1.0 stops. Confirm exposure via image review and histogram.

    The pic posted above was one picture and it's compromised for both shadow and highlight detail. When compromising, it does neither well.

    Also, be sure your white balance is correct.

    Later in photoshop, you will combine your exposures using layers.


    Some notes on using the 18-70mm f/3.5-4.5 Nikon D70 kit lens.

    Why are you shooting it wide open? You're already shooting long exposures on a tripod. Stop it down. This lens has great performance at f/8-f/11. If you blend these exposures, you might also change focus points to have the everything-in-focus effect. Or you could focus once at the hyperfocal distance using an aperture of f/5.6 or smaller.

    The lens is not flatteringly sharp wide-open, and like most wideangle zooms shot wide-open, there is some light falloff at the corners.

    Happy shooting.


    Edit: You should be using your spot meter for this. Your D70 has this handy feature that others (not naming them here) do not.
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2004
  9. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Daniel,

    The others have given you good advice. My biggest problem with the pic is that you have two competing subjects...the car and the building. De-emphasizing the building, by darkening it would have helped a bit, but shooting at a higher angle and looking down on the car would have probably made for a better pic overall.
     
  10. Squally

    Squally New Member

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    [​IMG]

    That was just my quick attempt at what double layering it would of looked like. But I didn't have a lot to work with since it was so overexposed.
     
  11. dmora

    dmora Guest

    yea, i tried cleaning it up in PS. I've got some less exposed images, but i kept moving the tripod to get better angles. Plus the folks that were there were getting tired and it was cold.
     
  12. dmora

    dmora Guest

    lots of great info here as well as the rest of you all. :coold: check your PMs.

    I was thinking about using a prime to blur the building a bit to do what you say... but i only have a 50mm so i would have had to have been 30" back from the car which would have put me about 20' off the side of the building's roof. :mamoru:
     
  13. MrBucket

    MrBucket OT Supporter

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  14. sony

    sony Active Member

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    If you wan't to pick up ND filters, check eBay. They're shipped from Japan so they may take a while. I got ND filters for my 50mm/85mm combo and my 70-210 f/2.8. :hs: They came out to about 30-40 bucks shipped.

    Search for Hoya SMC filters. They're pretty good quality and coated to prevent ghosting.
     
  15. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    This probably won't work well.

    One lens, one spot. Multiple exposures. Trying the other thing might have interesting results, but the probably won't be good.


    Also, you don't want a regular "ND" filter. That just darkens the entire picture. A graduated ND filter darkens only a section of the frame, say the top 1/3rd or perhaps top 2/3rds depending on the filter.

    ND and Graduated ND filters are generally used during the daytime too.
     
  16. tefnut

    tefnut build

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    You could just overkill it in Photoshop with the good ole' Brightness/Contrast :dunno:

    [​IMG]
     

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