Home Audio help: Bass trouble

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Marcos, Aug 8, 2003.

  1. Marcos

    Marcos OT Supporter

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    Im having trouble getting the bass to sound good in my room.

    Its not a big room, about 3m x 3m.

    There are bass 'areas', places where i stand and the bass sounds great, but the worst place to hear good bass is exactly were my armchair is :mad:

    I dont want to move the chair, as theres not much room.

    Is there anything i can buy or do to improve how the bass sounds through out my room, will speaker stands solve it? Or, some home made solution to improve the situation?
     
  2. flynfrog

    flynfrog Cool isnt Cheap

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    move the box around try firing it down or at a wall get teh wave time to develop beofre it its your chair
     
  3. Marcos

    Marcos OT Supporter

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    I forgot to mention, i have a midi hifi, as far as that type of hifi goes its pretty big. The subs are built into the main speakers (enclosures/cabinets):

    [​IMG]

    (only one pictured)

    The subs are about 8inch.
     
  4. nt

    nt Guest

    generally the closer to the rear and side walls the louder/deeper the bass. however, it bass you do get won't be as tight/punchy.
     
  5. Marcos

    Marcos OT Supporter

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    I want louder/deeper, i dont listen to music too loud, i dont mind the volume as long as its good wholesome bass, which it can produce, but all depends where i sit.

    Anything else that affects it? Like speaker stands? or putting the speakers on top of a surface that absorbs vibrations or other little trick like that?
     
  6. 04

    04 Guest

    Bass tightness is not directly correlated to the placement of the subwoofer in your room.

    Infact, if your speaker is flat in an anechoic chamber, then placing it next to a wall will give you up to 6dB of gain at low frequencies, which could very well account for the muddiness you hear. And we all know the "tightness" falacy is typically impacted by having an exagerated response (due to a high Q speaker) around the 80 to 150hz range. Most people would describe a speaker with a very low frequency response as sounding muddy.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 9, 2003
  7. 04

    04 Guest

    Uh, the wave doesnt ever have to "develop"...

    infact, aside from moving the speakers around, the position of the speaker will not affect the output of low bass frequencies. Obviously though, you will want to place the speakers with the drivers facing towards you if they are full range speakers.

    About the only thing you can do is try experimenting with placing the speakers in different spots.

    The problem you are having is that you are getting cancellation due to standing waves. In a larger room, this is not as much as a problem, and likewise, it isnt as much a problem in VERY small spaces as well (like a car). Unfortunatly the smaller rooms are the ones that have such issues.

    Another option is to build bass traps, but I doubt you want to go to those extremes.
     
  8. Marcos

    Marcos OT Supporter

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    Damn, good info :eek3:, thanks. So i'll move them around, its about all i can do
     
  9. nt

    nt Guest

    so a sub in the middle of the room sounds the same as a sub placed in the corner? gonna have to disagree w/ that statement.
     
  10. nt

    nt Guest

    gotta disagree w/ this statement also.
     
  11. 04

    04 Guest

    Ok, so why do you feel that way? What did I say wrong?
     
  12. 04

    04 Guest

    A subwoofer placed in the middle of the room COULD sound the same as placed in a corner, it will depend on the room. And I didnt mean that the woofer wont sound different, just that "tightness" was actually more a term describing system damping (which is mostly room independent). A lot of "warm sounding" speakers are those that are just high Q designs that sound tight by default.

    It depends more on the woofer than anything else for the "tightness". If your speakers are flat @ low frequencies in an anechoic chamber than it may well not sound tight in a corner, because corner loading will give you boundry reinforcement.
     

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