Hip/knee instability

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by ices, Jan 28, 2010.

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  1. ices

    ices New Member

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    After a few years of dealing with an injury, I've started squatting again. However, when I go heavy, my lower body never feels completely stable and I get twinges in the right side of my lower back and right knee. I figure it's probably due to some instability/imbalance so I want to play it safe and incorporate some prehab before I risk another injury that puts me out of the game for another few years.

    Does anyone have any good info regarding common hip and knee area instabilities and muscle inbalances, how to diagnose them (knee drifts a certain way during certain movements, inflexibility when doing certain stretches, etc.) and how to fix them? Thanks bros.
     
  2. ices

    ices New Member

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    I had a bad neck/upper back sprain several years ago so now I only front squat w/an oly grip. My old lifting buddy checked my form and said it was solid. Bars on shoulders, elbows high, back flat, torso upright, good depth and shoulder width stance.

    I started squatting again several months ago and haven't really pushed myself until a few weeks ago. At heavier weights, it becomes very obvious that my knees want to buckle in. It may be a weakness in the abduction/external rotation so I started working on that. However, I'm more worried about a left to right inbalance since I feel that my right side drops down lower when I squat (like I'm pivoting my hips to the right and putting more weight on that side) and I've had pain in my right knee and right side of my lower back.
     
  3. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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  4. reminisce

    reminisce OT Supporter

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    stationary lunges
     
  5. Fattiefalldown

    Fattiefalldown t(-.-t)

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    If you're worried about the external rotation, work that rotation under some length. If it's bothering you during squatting, it is likely your muscle can't provide adequate tension while lengthened. Lunges, split squats, and 1L squats (not pistols) are a good way to train that. Just working hip external rotation probably wont solve the problem.
     
  6. RollinDollos

    RollinDollos Guest

    Do your feet have an external rotation standing still?
    Do you have flat feet?
    Do your knees bow out or cave in?
    Do you have an anterior pelvic tilt?

    Do you have a job sitting or spend most of your day sitting?
    Do you have a job that requires dress shoes?
     
  7. ices

    ices New Member

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    Thanks, I'll look into that.

    It's pretty humbling how difficult bulgarian split squats w/45 lbs DBs can be. I'll keep on with the single leg movements.

    From my expert research online, it seems like most problems are due to a combination of weak glutes, tight hamstrings, weak abs, and tight hip flexors. I'll keep doing stretches and glute/core work and see how things feel in a couple weeks.
     
  8. RollinDollos

    RollinDollos Guest

    A Seated job means your psosas (deep hip flexor running from the bottom of your hip up the lumbar) is going to be extremely tight.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RrOUZgFPlPc

    Dress shoes keep your feet in a constant plantarflextion (ankle extension) taking away the natural dorsiflextion (ankle flexion) and are causing the knees to cave in during a squat as compensation.

    Other tight muscles currently are you soleus (outsides of the ankle), gastrocnemius (big part of the calve), peroneals (outside of the shin), Rectus Femoris (the biggest muscle on the quad or the outside), IT band (side of the thigh), and your adductors.

    Invest in a foam roller and along with static stretches hit all of those areas.
     
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