A&P Help with my amateur "strobist" shots. *Warning, JDM Honda content*

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Stock, Jul 25, 2009.

  1. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    Ok, let's hurry up and get past the Honda hate. My buddy wanted some shots and I badly need practice with my off-shoe setup that seems to collect dust more and more as I get lazier and lazier.

    I'm a complete amateur when it comes to strobes, pieced together this setup about ~3 months ago and I really haven't gotten out and used it as much as I'd like. :sad2:

    2 Vivtar 285hv's fired with Cybersyncs
    10.8' stand
    7.5' stand
    60" umbrella
    45" umbrella

    My question is: What the fuck should I be doing to eliminate/minimize the umbrellas being visible in the car's reflection? Is this something most people handle in post or is there a way to alleviate it on location?

    Also, whatever else you guys would like to throw in about the rest of the set. They're getting good comments on the car forums, but most people don't know dick about photography so I figured I'd post the whole set here for real feedback. :)

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    Last edited: Jul 25, 2009
  2. Atheist

    Atheist oh, hi OT Supporter

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    Can you shoot through the umbrellas?
     
  3. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    I was. :o

    I've yet to "bounce" with them.
     
  4. Drunken Karnie Midget

    Drunken Karnie Midget In Yeo We Trust, All Others Pay Cash OT Supporter

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    A CPL should help with the reflection issue, as well as soften up the hot spots.

    Pull the car away from the background. You're getting a lot of shadows, and the backgrounds are distracting. keeping the car about 1.5 lengths away from your background will help separate the two (or so i'm told,) and avoid those shadows.
     
  5. horselover fat

    horselover fat in your driveway stealing your internet

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    is that a tramp stamp on the bumper?

    im sort of digging the interior shot but were your flash(s) set to low their lowest? think it would look alot better with not such a bright flash
     
  6. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    Never considered a CPL, thanks for that!

    Also have never heard that rule of thumb, I'll for sure keep that in mind. :wavey:

    Paint is peeling on the bumper. :o

    Interior shot is something that I tried copying out of some car magazine I saw this month. Dude had two flashes firing towards the seat, only his vantage point was outside of the car from the front. Figured I'd bite his shot a bit while also trying to change it up...

    Honestly, I played around inside the car for ~10 minutes or so and it was hot as balls so I didn't really put too much effort into once I was I wasn't getting what I wanted. I believe the Viv's were set to 1/16th but I didn't bother to check. :mamoru:
     
  7. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    A basic rule to help eliminate hotspots/reflections is to have the flash on a separate plane from the camera's lens. I see a lot of uneven lighting also so try to get the light source closer to the subject for a softer light with less dramatic falloff.
     
  8. the Rosswog

    the Rosswog OT Supporter

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    don't use umbrellas when shooting cars.
     
  9. MSIGuy

    MSIGuy om nom nom nom!

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    Closer will soften the light? I'm going out in a few hours to shoot some cars for the first time and I figured that I'd want to have the lights further to help reduce the hot spots?
     
  10. TheManLouisianaFace

    TheManLouisianaFace and decide!

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    .

    I don't know about cars, but for people the closer the light the softer. Why you see zach putting that 48" softbox inches from some chick's grill.
     
  11. MSIGuy

    MSIGuy om nom nom nom!

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    I think what I'm getting at is won't that make the reflection in the car that much harsher if you get it close?
     
  12. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    Awesome, thanks. For most of the shots the flashes were about ~6' high, but I'm ~6' also so that makes sense.

    I've never thought about it until I read your reply just now but every "setup" shot that I've seen for magazine shoots has been bare flashes... :rofl:

    Care to elaborate on the reasoning behind this? :eek3:

    Unless that's all I need to know... :noes:
     
  13. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    If I had to guess they use bare flashes because using an umbrella (shoot through or reflecting) would reduce the flash range a lot. A car is 12-24 foot long so you want to be able to keep the light as even as possible.

    If you look at some of the car shoot set ups you even seen special car sized softboxes positions above and to the sides of them alot. I've been thinking of making some to try out, maybe I'll get around to it when I'm done with my observatory.
     
  14. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    Remember flashes follow the inverse square law so a flash full power 5 feet from the subject has 4 times the power of the same flash, same power from 10 feet.

    This is one way to adjust your flash power other than using the power settings, but the draw back is the light that does hit the subject is the linear light so you end up with shadows vs lower power light very close to the subject which produces soft almost shadowless light. This applies to lights using modifiers such as shoot thru umbrellas though.
     
  15. TheManLouisianaFace

    TheManLouisianaFace and decide!

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    Yeah, I don't think it would work well for cars.
     
  16. EWhytsell

    EWhytsell New Member

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    I typically see bare flashes being used at about 8-12 feet from cars when people post pics of the sets.
     
  17. TheManLouisianaFace

    TheManLouisianaFace and decide!

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    Yes...that's why I'm agreeing with him.
     
  18. PackingMyBags

    PackingMyBags New Member

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    1- tell you buddy to clean his dirty car
    2- put some distance between your subject and your background unless its uber appealing
    3- bounce does work, but i dont use an umbrella...
    4- play around with your camera settings until you find a system that works.
    5-good luck
     
  19. Run N. Gun

    Run N. Gun Active Member

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    The interior shot had potential, but the front windshield poopoo'd the shot.

    Lighting is too harsh for night time. Softer and more consistent lighting would have made the pics awesome.
     
  20. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    I realize not every shot is textbook, guys. I know the windshield is dirty, this thread was more for lighting help but I guess that's what I get for asking for overall opinions.

    Still looking for a layman's explanation regarding no umbrellas for car shots. :)
     
  21. Ty Webb

    Ty Webb You don't have to go to college. This isn't Russia

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    "Brospeed" lol
     
  22. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    It's actually "BioSpeed". I'll let you decide if that's better or worse. :x:
     
  23. Ty Webb

    Ty Webb You don't have to go to college. This isn't Russia

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    Kinda like the Biodome?

    :)
     
  24. e.pie

    e.pie Active Member

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    umbrellas will make the hot spots bigger and too hard to clone out later in post, I wouldn't use them when shooting cars


    and it's kind of hard to shoot cars with only two strobes, I shoot with three and even that isn't enough sometimes :o


    and I never pass up an opportunity to whore my car pictures :o
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3628/3316951652_6792f71e6f_o.jpg
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3080/3256401673_21816507a9_o.jpg
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3097/3257232198_79cd45dbcb_o.jpg
     
  25. Stock

    Stock New Member

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    That makes sense. :wiggle:
     

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