GUN Help me stop tightening my fingers, please...

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by OrionDartanyu, Jan 7, 2008.

  1. OrionDartanyu

    OrionDartanyu I don't think I'm as revolutionary as Galileo, but

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    according to that target chart, I'm tightening my fingers. What's the cause of this? Is it poor trigger placement? How can I stop tighenting my fingers while firing :(
     
  2. johnson

    johnson New Member

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    Buy some snap caps and start dry firing. Are you anticipating when the round is going to fire? What part of the finger is on the trigger?
     
  3. Want2race

    Want2race Fearless

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    pistol?
    if so your probably rubbing your finger on the body of the frame
     
  4. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    Most modern centerfire pistols do not need snapcaps for dry firing but you can buy them then mix it up with live rounds at the range. If you've been anticipating recoil, your gun will jump even when you hit the snap cap.
     
  5. OrionDartanyu

    OrionDartanyu I don't think I'm as revolutionary as Galileo, but

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    can you use snapcaps more than once?
     
  6. johnson

    johnson New Member

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  7. OrionDartanyu

    OrionDartanyu I don't think I'm as revolutionary as Galileo, but

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    indefinately? Or when will I want to throw them out? But I'm seriously sick of my lowerleft groups. I don't want to artificially correct, I want to fix this. Snap caps a really good training tool than?
     
  8. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    My plastic ones started to "jam" after awhile. They started peeling, they couldn't stand up to the metal parts in the gun. Pistolgear.com sells metal ones, I haven't tried them though.
     
  9. lt1aggie

    lt1aggie what?

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    can you please post that chart? I thought I had it saved, but I can't find it. :x:
     
  10. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Here's a dry fire practice technique for you to practice that's fairly easy for new shooters that you can bring with you to the range.

    Take a penny, balance it near the end next to your sight. Take a sight picture over a target, and dry. What you are attempting to do is keep the penny balanced on your barrel.

    You may have a combination of flinching (shot anticipation) and follow up. When you break the trigger, it should surprise you.

    Learn were your gun breaks, and how to keep a follow through. Meaning, keep it pointed over the target after it breaks and keep your sight picture longer.
     
  11. ReefBlue

    ReefBlue New Member

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    A common problem is when people pull the trigger, all of their fingers make the same motion causing problems. Try to see if you're doing that.
     
  12. Thunderbear

    Thunderbear Yggdrasil's Forester.

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    Take your firing hand, and grip the pistol. The force should come from the second/third joint in your hand. If the tips of your fingernails are white, you're gripping with the first joint. Loosen the fingertips so that the linear pressure from your finger grip is directed only in a front to back motion. Gripping tight with the fingers can introduce a shake in the shooting hand.
     

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