A&P Help me rate my macro's!!!!!!!!!

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Little Spunky $#!T, Jul 7, 2003.

  1. Little Spunky $#!T

    Little Spunky $#!T :cool:

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    I've took several macro's and dont know what I need to do to improve, or stuff I don't need to do as much. Please help me rate my pics, and give me some pointers.
    There are lots more pics (not all macro's) at www.railegelbvieh.com/imagery

    Here are some recent ones:
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    Last edited: Jul 7, 2003
  2. Little Spunky $#!T

    Little Spunky $#!T :cool:

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  3. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    meh.....

    this one is your best IMO
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  4. Little Spunky $#!T

    Little Spunky $#!T :cool:

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    tips?
     
  5. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    macro work is really all about finding something that looks cool up close. lighting is very important. Several of your shots are lit with the strobe next to the lens, which overexposes the foreground and makes the background too dark. Try taking your strobe off the camera and lighting from the side. You'll need a flash cord for this. Use a white card opposite the strobe to bounce the light back onto the subject. You can also try top lighting through a piece of wax paper to soften the light. Don't be afraid to use shadows as part of the composition as well. One of the coolest macro shots I've ever seen was a simple egg, totally backlit with a long shadow angling towards the camera.

    Next, look at your composition. This is tough because I can't tell you how to compose a particular subject. Stick to the "rule of thirds" when composing your photos. Your horizon line shouldn't cross in the exact center of the frame. Also, don't center your subject. Place it in one of the "thirds" of your frame.

    Texture is also important in macro shots. Look for subjects that offer a unique texture, be it silky smooth or rough. Light accordingly.

    Unusual subjects work well too. An extreme close up of a bugs face can look awsome or frighting.

    Just some basic tips to get you started. Macro is more than just making sure you have a sharp close up.

    Cheers
    Jim
     
  6. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    yeah... like Jcolman said.... you need to find interesting subjects. something that when someone looks at it they go, "wow"
     

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