A&P Help me, I suck with a flash

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by xenon supra, Sep 28, 2008.

  1. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    So most of the time when I use a flash I am just guessing and have no idea what I'm doing...

    I generally just use an SB600 on camera and tilt it up at about 60-90 degrees.

    Most of the time this works fine and works well enough for what I'm trying to do.

    But every now and again I get something that looks like this. I know specifically that on this shot I had the flash pointed towards the dark colored ceiling, which was maybe 12-15 feet above me.

    Any pointers on how to eliminate the shadows?

    Yes I know its a shitty picture, but its the best example of what I am trying to fix.

    Thanks :bowdown:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. tetsuo

    tetsuo And shepherds we shall be...

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    take the flash off the camera
     
  3. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    Or basically, in any low light situation where the subject is close to a wall and I only have one on camera flash, what's the best way to approach this?
     
  4. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    and what? ask some random stranger to hold my flash at them while I take a picture? there's got to be a way to get a decent looking picture somehow...
     
  5. iridium130

    iridium130 OT Supporter

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    Use an omni-bounce? :dunno:
     
  6. Jbrown

    Jbrown OT Supporter

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    Dial down the power? Soften the light some how?
     
  7. wrong1

    wrong1 Member

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    I think that for what you are trying to achieve keeping a few things in mind while shooting will greatly benefit you. A slower shutter speed will increase the ambient light coming into your lens, effectively softening the shadows. This will also allow you to cut some power out of the flash. Close up the aperture a bit to soften the flash further, and also be aware of the flash to subject distance. Increasing the distance softens the flash. What you are trying to do requires a balance of all of these things. Buy a decent diffuser. or even make a ghetto one out of a white piece of paper.
     
  8. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    i forgot to mention I do have one on there

    yeah I guess something like that...

    This makes sense, unfortunately I only had a 12-24 on so I couldn't get much further away at the time.

    I'm still having trouble figuring out how to do a rear curtain sync and getting it to work as I want it to.

    Maybe I'll play with it some today.
     
  9. White Stormy

    White Stormy Take that, subspace!

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    I don't think the flash was pointed at the ceiling.. their shadows are almost right behind them, like the flash was pointed straight at them.

    It looks like you were rotated left in portrait orientation with the flash on camera (meaning it's out to your left a bit) pointed straight ahead. That would explain the shadows being slightly off center, and you're a little taller than them so the shadows are a little lower than them.
     
  10. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    maybe :dunno:

    i always point it straight up, but maybe this time when I turned the camera I forgot to... i dunno.

    i took a lot of pics :o
     
  11. adamlewis88

    adamlewis88 New Member

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    Yeah...that flash is pretty straight on. Get that omni bounce piece of shit off there too.
     
  12. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    better than no diffuser :hs:
     
  13. Perkwunos

    Perkwunos Dog Bones OT Supporter

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    bounce the flash off the ceiling?
     
  14. xenon supra

    xenon supra OT Supporter

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    still gives shadows sometimes... :hs:
     
  15. Pants

    Pants New Member

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  16. Jbrown

    Jbrown OT Supporter

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  17. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    OP wasn't pointing the flash straight on, straight on shadow doesn't look like that.

    When you move the flash head toward the ceiling when your camera is in portrait aspect, it'll throw that distinct 4o'clock shadow behind the subjects.

    In order to kill that shadow you need to NOT turn the head toward the ceiling. Just let the flash bounce off of the wall or have someone who's wearing a white shirt stand about 6 ft away from your flash and bounce off of his shirt.

    You need to learn to shoot with shooting hand below the camera, flash pointing to YOUR right. And with shooting hand above the camera, flashing pointing to YOUR left. And let flash face the wall that's about 6 to 8 ft away from you for best bounce. If the closest wall is further away from you than 10ft, adjust flash EV accordingly.
     

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