HDMI ver. 1.3

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by RedDawg, Jan 21, 2008.

  1. RedDawg

    RedDawg Well-Known Member

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    and is it worth an extra couple hundred $'s?


    The TV i'm looking at buying is this samsung http://www.crutchfield.com/App/Product/Item/Main.aspx?search=hlt5087s&i=305HLT5087


    but i can get the step-up TV for around an extra $200. http://www.crutchfield.com/App/Product/Item/Main.aspx?search=hlt5089s&i=305HLT5089

    The only major difference i can find between them is that the higher priced one uses HDMI version 1.3
    The other differences (picture-in-picture, and an illuminated remote control) i couldnt care less about, i'd never use those features.
     
  2. David02

    David02 Guest

    There are really 2 questions you need to ask yourself, that should help you make your decision.

    1) Will this be your main TV? If it is just going in your bedroom for casual TV watching, then you definately don't need to spend the extra cash. However, if this will be your primary TV that you plan to watch movies/sports/etc. on then you may want to consider spending the extra cash.

    2) How long do you plan on having this as your main TV? Deep Color (which requires HDMI 1.3) will probably be the next big thing in HDTV. If you want your TV to be able to utilze that technology when it becomes mainstream then go ahead and get a 1.3 compatible TV now.
     
  3. RedDawg

    RedDawg Well-Known Member

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    1) main tv. Used primarily for movies & watching hockey games, i rarely watch anything else.

    2) would like to keep it until it either dies or technology changes forcing a new purchase. I was looking at blu-ray players and i noticed that "Deep Color" spec on the on sony player i was reading about.

    So you would recommend spending the extra $200 and get the 89S over the 87S? Any idea on a good price for it, the local TV shop has the 89S for $1750, but i havent really shopped around for a better price yet, i just went randomly browsing while my g/f was getting a haircut and realized i've got a decent tax refund this year and could upgrade my TV.
     
  4. David02

    David02 Guest

    $1750 is not a bad price for a 50" HDTV. It sounds like you will definately be keeping it long enough to justify the additional cost. If you got the cash... I say go for it.
     
  5. El Beaner

    El Beaner OT Supporter

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    Here is the difference between all the HDMI versions to help you make your decision

    taken from hdmi.org

    HDMI 1.1:
    • Support for DVD Audio.
    HDMI 1.2:
    • Adds features and capabilities that increase HDMI's appeal for use in both the CE and PC industries. Specifically, the features and modifications for HDMI 1.2 include: Support for One Bit Audio format, such as SuperAudio CD's DSD (Direct Stream Digital), changes to offer better support for current and future PCs with HDMI outputs, including: availability of the widely-used HDMI Type A connector for PC sources and displays with full support for PC video formats, ability for PC sources to use their native RGB color space while retaining the option to support the YCbCr CE color space, requirement for HDMI 1.2 and later displays to support future low-voltage (i.e., AC-coupled) sources, such as those based on PCI Express I/O technology.
    HDMI 1.2a:
    • Consumer Electronic Control (CEC) features and command sets and CEC compliance tests are now fully specified.
    • Creation of version 1.2a of the HDMI Compliance Test Specification (CTS), which includes a CEC Supplement. HDMI CTS 1.2a has been updated for technical consistency with HDMI Specification 1.2a as well as to the recently released HDMI Specification 1.2.
    • Significantly, CTS 1.2a contains additional cable and connector testing and Authorized Testing Center (ATC) submission requirements. Specifically, under CTS 1.2a, the Adopter shall submit for testing to the ATC any new HDMI cable whose length exceeds previously tested cables.
    • Additionally, HDMI Licensing, LLC will maintain a list of approved connectors. For a device to pass CTS 1.2a testing at an ATC, all connectors on such device must appear on the approved connector list. To add a connector to this list, the vendor must submit to the ATC or HDMI Licensing, LLC full and passing testing results.
    HDMI 1.3:
    • Higher speed: HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Color and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundation that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
    • Deep Color: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) color depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colors in unprecedented detail.
    • Broader color space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC color standard), which removes current color space limitations and enables the display of any color viewable by the human eye.
    • New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
    • Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
    • New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.
    Return to top



    Q. Are all of the new HDMI versions backward compatible with previous versions?
    Yes, all HDMI versions are fully backward compatible with all previous versions.
    Return to top



    Q. What’s new in the HDMI 1.3 Specification?
    • Higher speed: Although all previous versions of HDMI have had more than enough bandwidth to support all current HDTV formats, including full, uncompressed 1080p signals, HDMI 1.3 increases its single-link bandwidth to 340 MHz (10.2 Gbps) to support the demands of future HD display devices, such as higher resolutions, Deep Color and high frame rates. In addition, built into the HDMI 1.3 specification is the technical foundation that will let future versions of HDMI reach significantly higher speeds.
    • Deep Color: HDMI 1.3 supports 10-bit, 12-bit and 16-bit (RGB or YCbCr) color depths, up from the 8-bit depths in previous versions of the HDMI specification, for stunning rendering of over one billion colors in unprecedented detail.
    • Broader color space: HDMI 1.3 adds support for “x.v.Color™” (which is the consumer name describing the IEC 61966-2-4 xvYCC color standard), which removes current color space limitations and enables the display of any color viewable by the human eye.
    • New mini connector: With small portable devices such as HD camcorders and still cameras demanding seamless connectivity to HDTVs, HDMI 1.3 offers a new, smaller form factor connector option.
    • Lip Sync: Because consumer electronics devices are using increasingly complex digital signal processing to enhance the clarity and detail of the content, synchronization of video and audio in user devices has become a greater challenge and could potentially require complex end-user adjustments. HDMI 1.3 incorporates automatic audio synching capabilities that allows devices to perform this synchronization automatically with total accuracy.
    • New HD lossless audio formats: In addition to HDMI’s current ability to support high-bandwidth uncompressed digital audio and all currently-available compressed formats (such as Dolby® Digital and DTS®), HDMI 1.3 adds additional support for new lossless compressed digital audio formats Dolby TrueHD and DTS-HD Master Audio™.
     

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