HDD Speed vs size

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Kieffer87, Oct 16, 2007.

  1. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    I just read that Hitachi has a 4TB desktop drive in the works for the next few years. Is it just me or is 1TB enough for now and they should start working more on the speed of the drive vs size. I know companies are working on solid state but after all the speed of the HDD is one of the biggest bottle necks in a pc. :dunno:
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    meh. I have almost 2TB and only about 25% free. So I could see the use.
     
  3. c_lokey

    c_lokey Member

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    ^what the hell do you have on your hard drive!
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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  5. Supernaut

    Supernaut New Member

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    1s and 0s, mostly. Occasionally a 2 but a scandisk corrects that.
     
  6. Shorty

    Shorty New Member

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    im guessing theres a lot of backup for other computers on there?
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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  8. TigreTek

    TigreTek omega member OT Supporter

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  9. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    that accounts for about 100GB
     
  10. Shorty

    Shorty New Member

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  11. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The hardware will never get faster -- 15krpm is pretty much the limit for what the lubricant on the drive platters can withstand before it gets flung off. All they can do is pack the bits more tightly so they can be read faster -- hence the interest in a 4TB drive that's the same size as the 1TB drive they have now.
     
  12. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    ^^Makes since. I don't think even if I tried that I could fill 4TB. Well yea actually I could, pron galore:noes:
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    You will, once people invent bigger files.
     
  14. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Think movies.

    I've only got 130gb left on a Seagate 750gb drive. It's all movies though.
     
  15. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    Now that we have HD movies, you can fill a 1TB drive with just 40-50 movies or so.
     
  16. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    the speed of drives is crap now, unless you shell out lots of cash for a nice scsi drive/array


    i could fill 4gb:
    convert my dvd collection to high quality xvids or h.264 files
    convert my cds into FLAC or some other lossless
    use it as a backup for all my computers
    make iso's of every dvd/cd i have

    that would probably fill it up


    the scary thing about large drives >750gb, is that you can dump a ton of stuff on them, but if they crap out on you, you will be out of a lot. unless you have a good backup or raid setup
     
  17. wetwillie

    wetwillie New Member

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    Actually it's the disks exploding...I think.

    Saw a myth busters episode where they were looking at the speeds of CDROMs and they tried to speed one up beyond the 52k and the disk itself flew apart. Great episode.
     
  18. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    a hard drive platter is going to be much more solid than a cd rom
     
  19. wetwillie

    wetwillie New Member

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    True but there aren't there also imperfections in HD platters?

    I think one of the main things that made the CDs explode is the slight imperfections of density throughout the disk and these caused it to have an imperfect spin.
     
  20. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    i wonder what the formatted capacity of a 4gb hard drive would be
    i bet you lose a couple hundred gigabytes
     
  21. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Goddammit, you're not losing anything.

    Software companies insist on sticking to the arbitrary (and nonsensical) standard that a Kilobyte has to be equal to a power of 2 because computers do everything in binary. It's based on bullshit logic because 1024 = 2^10, and using 2^10 implies that 10 has some special meaning to a computer, which it doesn't -- HUMANS measure things in groups of ten, not computers. If they were going to do this, they should have used 2^8 (2^2^2^2) or 2^16 (2^2^2^2^2) or something like that, but since those aren't anywhere close to 1000, they should have just used 1000 as the unit of measurement (as displayed to humans anyway) just like it is everywhere else in the world.

    Because they didn't do that, it LOOKS like you're losing usable space when you format a hard drive, because the hard drive companies (correctly) say that a Gigabyte is 1,000,000,000 bytes, whereas the OS says that a Gigabyte is 1,073,741,824 bytes (1024*1024*1024) instead. That means the OS claims a 1GB drive only has 0.93GB of usable space, when in reality you still have all 1,000,000,000 bytes at your disposal.

    The 1024 vs. 1000 clusterfuck is causing even more confusion. Now we have terms like Kibibytes (KiB), Mibibytes (MiB), and Gibibytes (GiB) to distinguish the weird standard of using 1024 instead of 1000, and so now there's even more shit for unsavvy users to get confused by. Just wait until some hard drive manufacturers switch to using GiB to rate their drives and others don't switch. Then Joe User looks at a 500GB drive and wonders why it costs less than the 500GiB drive next to it. Then he gets it home and finds out he only "gets to use" 466GB (oops, I mean GiB) on his new hard drive, and concludes he got cheated, and files a lawsuit, and so on and so on...
     
  22. wetwillie

    wetwillie New Member

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    Dues, I'm not sure I agree. I bought a laptop with a 120Gb drive, after formatting my usable space was something like 96Gb. That's a 20% reduction and I don't believe that's due to the issues you are describing.

    However, I agree that the whole thing you described is causing more confusion than it's worth.
     
  23. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Then there's something else on the drive (like a restore partition), or else you didn't actually get a 120GB drive.
     
  24. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    deuse you're wrong. Filesystems do have overhead beyond the 1024~1000 issue.
     
  25. wetwillie

    wetwillie New Member

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    Nope, I already checked out both. The restore partition, I deleted. The drive still shows in the device mgr as a 120Gb drive.
     

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