A&P Have any experience with exposure meters?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Hua, Apr 14, 2004.

  1. Hua

    Hua AZN photographer crew

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    I haven't even really bothered with reading into their capabilities, but I will tomorrow. Any of you use one? I find it a PITA to get the right settings for indoor shots with halogen/tungsten lighting. Was thinking maybe this would help.

    :)

    Thanks players!
     
  2. Merli

    Merli gplus.to/merli OT Supporter

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    I assume you're talking about handheld light meters...

    They measure light REACHING the subject, as opposed to the TTL light meter in your camera that measures light BOUNCING off the subject.

    With modern cameras, there is no need to use a handheld light meter. They were designed for use with those old cameras that don't have a light meter intergrated into their bodies.

    Just learn (with experience) which white balance settings to use in what lighting conditions... Hopefully your camera allows for manual white balance settings and compensation.
     
  3. Kinks

    Kinks Sup. OT Supporter

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    yeah no need for handheld meters with modern cameras. you'll spend just as much time stuffing around with the handheld meter as learning to use your built in meter correctly.

    research what metering method your camera uses and then aim your camera's metering segments at whatever is roughly 18% grey - because that's what the meter is aiming to achieve. skin is a decent estimate, if you're taking portraits. photo.net should have some decent guides on learning to meter, actually.

    as for white balance, same deal. play with it until it works :p
     
  4. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    I have a Seconic meter that I've owned for about 30 years. I use it whenever I have to shoot 16mm film. When I shoot with my SLR or a video camera I use the meter built into the camera except when I'm prelighting a studio scene, then I use the handheld meter to measure the light ratio.

    Most professional photographers and all cinematographers use handheld meters to measure not only the total amount of light falling on their subjects but also the ratio of light, ie the difference between the key light and the fill light for example.

    I wouldn't bother buying a meter unless you plan on pursuing a career in photography.
     
  5. Hua

    Hua AZN photographer crew

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    Guess I won't be needing one. Thanks for the advice guys! :)
     

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