Has the byte outlived its usefulness?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Cybert, Aug 5, 2006.

  1. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    Have you ever wondered why every computer system seems to be 8-bit? PDP-8 is an older example that is 12-bit. Well, there IS no reason! 8-bits happens to cover the alphabet pretty well--that's about it. We should be addressing by the BIT, and just get 64-bit chunks or whatever the word-size is.
     
  2. Zombie Pornstar

    Zombie Pornstar I'm cumming RAWL

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    But then we can't say "What did the floppy disk say to the computer?" "Let's get a byte to eat". This would cause mass sadness and probably even strikes from the minorities.
     
  3. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    Probably the only reason.
     
  4. Euclid

    Euclid New Member

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    What are you talking about? :ugh:
     
  5. misha

    misha New Member

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    explain why you would address by the bit? word is 32bits.
     
  6. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    There are bit oriented systems, but you wouldn't want to use them. This post is pretty overwhelmingly foolish, as you have no concept of the implications of bit oriented computing.

    Maybe after Jesus comes back, bit systems will rock. But until then, Bible says that they suck. And if this is the kind of engineering you'll be carrying out after the singhularity, god help us all.
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    that's about as stupid as saying we should stop using binary and switch to hex... Doesn't work well in real-world applications.

    The "byte" is just a logical grouping of bits.
     
  8. EkriirkE

    EkriirkE Zika Xenu OT Supporter

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    bit is 1, byte is 8, word is 16, dword is 32, qword is 64
     
  9. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    How is 8 logical? It's a power of 2 that is not itself a power of 2!

    There IS no reason for it.
     
  10. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    Careful there. Word is 32 in many systems. This trips up a lot of people. Bit, nybble, and byte are pretty universal, but after that it's tricky.
     
  11. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    WRONG.

    a "byte" is a logical unit that was devised as the smallest neccessary to store a character from the ASCII character set. Every character set since then has been either single/multi byte for simplicity.

    Almost everything holds it's basis in what was "logical" at the original point of inception for that concept. Changing it now would be foolish, stupid, time-consuming, and provide no benefit and cause infinite problems.

    why do you even care?
     
  12. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    Well come singularity we won't even have the common 32 bit chunks or related. I see everything being binary (including language).
     
  13. YodaHart

    YodaHart New Member

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    What would be the advantage of using a 16-bit byte? To encompass other languages? I don't think you know what you're talking about. A larger byte would just be a waste of space.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2006
  14. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I'd posted a smartass comment before, but here's the reason why we don't measure space in bits.

    If I measured my hard drive space in bits (let's say I had a 1 megabit hard drive for simplicity's sake) then I would need to be able to store a million possible starting locations for any file that was stored on that hard drive. That means that every single Table of Contents entry would need 40 bits just to store the starting and ending locations of the file, plus another 40 bits to store its own starting and ending location. So that's an overhead of 80 bits just to record where the file is on the hard drive; by comparison, a hard drive that measures its size in bytes only needs 64 bits to store the location of every file and its corresponding Table of Contents entry.

    Now, 16 more bits might not seem like a lot, but if you pile a few thousand file fragments on the drive, you're talking about possibly 100,000 bits that have gone to waste just to store files with greater precision; or roughly 10% of the available space. That is almost certainly more wasted space than the waste that comes from having "empty" unusable bits at the end of every file, considering that the most wasted bits per file on the byte-partitioned drive in our example is 7.

    16/7 > 2x the wasted space. The ratio only climbs higher as you get bigger drives, and bigger blocks of space on that drive.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2006
  15. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    1 word is 32 bits where most of us are from.
     
  16. EkriirkE

    EkriirkE Zika Xenu OT Supporter

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    :dunno: in all my programming, a word has always been 2 bytes; 16 bits. in 32b assembly and c programming i need to use a dword if i want 32 bits. must be a canadian thing :mamoru:
     
  17. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    After the singularity, everything will be governed by stupid ideas from idiotic turds.

    Okay, thats harsh. But do you realize that you just randomly come up with ideas that have no merit, assign them religious signifigance and then tell everyone about them? Kinda like... a crazy person? Someone talking to Jesus on 5th street?
     
  18. mace

    mace i don't read

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    they should of made a byte 10 bits so hard drive disk space is accurate.
     
  19. georgexi

    georgexi o.O OT Supporter

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    1 word = 16 bits
     
  20. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    That isn't the reason why disk space is inaccurate. Disk space is inaccurate because the disk companies say that 1MB = 1,000,000B and software companies say that 1MB = 1,048,576B. Why? Because the closest power of 2 to 1000 is 1024, and the software geeks decided that EVERYTHING needed to be measured in powers of 2. The disk companies are right; it's the programmers that insist on fucking things up.

    Either way though, the total number of bytes on a hard drive is exactly the same no matter how you group them together, so you're not getting ripped off.
     
  21. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    :hsugh: Yeah, using powers of 2 is just completely arbitrary. Nothing at all to do with how the electronics actually work.
     
  22. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    The mebibyte is your friend. Learn it. Shortned, it's a MiB. Or Kibibyte.

    So 1024 is a kibibyte, and so on. I think it's kibibyte, mebibyte gibibyte, pebibyte, so on. Good stuff.
     
  23. Cybert

    Cybert New Member

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    I'm not sure what you're getting at. Hard disks are clustured, and that clusters is usually pretty high. 4KiB to 16KiB. That wouldn't change. Sure you'd get bigger pointers all around, but a particular architecture may be 64-bit--thus LESS pointers.
     

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