Hard drive pricing....

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by LongDongWong, Mar 30, 2006.

  1. LongDongWong

    LongDongWong U can call me Mr.Wong

    Joined:
    Oct 24, 2001
    Messages:
    2,293
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Bay Area
    whats a good price to pay for a hard drive per gig now a days/....?
     
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2006
  2. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    22,756
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    yinzer / nilbog, trollhio
    i paid 27 cents per gig for my 300 gig seagate drive...that was after rebate.

    it depends on what your looking for. i don't need anything fast, because this drive went in my tivo. so it's an ata 100, it's not an sata.
    an sata drive will cost you more...and something high performance will cost you more, like a raptor drive.
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    you can't go per GB... The price diff between two drives may not be much, but with a large jump in capacity. Likewise, at the top-end, the price can raise steeply.
     
  4. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

    Joined:
    Apr 27, 2002
    Messages:
    21,696
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Edmonton, AB
    SATA drives bottom out at around 45 cents per gig around here (Canadian dollars). The best deal these days is a 250 or 300 gig, go below or above that, and you'll pay more per gig probably.
     
  5. mikeeb13

    mikeeb13 New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 16, 2005
    Messages:
    15,204
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    cowlifornia
    got my Seagate 300 GB for 60 bucks after rebate :noes:
     
  6. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm very apprehensive about having hundreds of gigabytes of data on one piece of hardware; it allows for tons of games and ridiculously-large movie downloads, sure, but it probably also has all your finances, your resume, irreplaceable family photos, etc. Not that I've done anything about it in my case, but I'm worrying like a son of a bitch, believe you me.
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    thats's what dvd archiving and ftp servers are for.
     
  8. Goonigoogoo

    Goonigoogoo Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2004
    Messages:
    14,765
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's what you backup your data. There should be no excuse for home users not to backup their data, its so simple and inexpensive these days.

    I recently had a 36GB raptor crap out on me, but i had everything backed up. Turns out they sent me a 74GB replacement with an apology that it took too long to replace. :)
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I don't own an ftp server and recordable DVD's go bad in a couple of years -- rewritable ones go bad even faster. Not to mention that it would take 5 DVD-R DL's to back up my hard drive, WITH file compression. The only recording media proven to last 50 years with no fatal degradation are paper and magnetic tape.

    I have contemplated getting a tape drive, it's just a matter of convincing myself that such a purpose-built device is worth the money and the loss of a drive bay.
     
  10. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    Then use DVD-RAM, it's designed for archiving. 100,000 re-writes and lasts 30 years minimum (it's actually part of the spec).

    As for the original question: $/GB is an OK metric to compare capacity to cost, but it fails to account for other factors, such as performance and quality.
     
  11. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've also considered DVD-RAM, but while the drivers may support a more HDD-like table of contents -- instead of a normal CD/DVD that has the entire TOC at the front of the disc -- it still uses the same magneto-optical technology to store the data. That means, unless you actually manage to find a DVD-RAM drive that takes DVD-RAMs still in their holders, the disc will have the same weaknesses as any other rewritable disc.

    As for the 30-year lifespan, somehow I suspect they're talking about writing once and sticking the disc on a shelf for 30 years instead of rewriting the disc with a new backup file every two weeks. ANYTHING will last a long time if it only gets used once.
     
  12. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2004
    Messages:
    28,491
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Southern Oregon
    I think they use the term "shelf-life" which would indeed indicate storage, not usage.
     
  13. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    The discs (which are not MO, btw) are designed to last for over 100,000 re-writes. RW disks are like what, 1,000? So unless you mishandle them, they should last for 100,000 full re-writes or 30 years shelf life, whichever comes first. Plus DVD-RAM has built in hardware error checking and correction for the media. Like a hard drive it can remap sectors, and the discs have extra sectors available to the drive for just such a use. DVD-RAM was designed to be used as an archive media and works quite well as one.

    And yes, that is why it's called "Shelf Life". The same goes for tape and even paper though. If you use it over and over it there is more of a chance for mechanical failure.

    DVD-R/RW will degrade long before 30 years, btw. Hell, many pressed DVDs probably won't make it that long due to layer oxidation.
     
  14. Grelmar

    Grelmar New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 25, 2006
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Calgary, Alberta, Great White North
    You can also buy all the parts to build a 250G USB hard drive for around $100-$120CDN. Cheaper if you wanna risk buying the HD off of EBay (I don't like buying hard HD's from EBay - it just seems a little too risky).

    In my experience, you don't need the medium to last 30 years. You just need it to last a few hours/days longer than the crapped out medium.
     
  15. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    For normal stuff that's fine, but for irreplaceable/extremely important stuff (which deusexaethera brought up and what started this tangent) you want a backup on a medium that will last a good while. For example, I don't backup all my programs and ISOs and stuff on DVD-RAM, but I do keep my photos and important documents on a set of DVD-RAM discs.
     
  16. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2005
    Messages:
    22,756
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    yinzer / nilbog, trollhio
  17. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 27, 2005
    Messages:
    19,712
    Likes Received:
    0
    Impressive. I wasn't aware that DVD-RAMs had parity data and spare sectors built in. That definitely does put them a notch above normal DVD-RWs.

    But yes, DVD-RAMs are MO. All rewritable optical discs work by having a thin layer of 'stuff' that can be compared to liquid crystals, except that the crystals have to be heated before they can be realigned.

    The laser reads the data by measuring the reflectivity of each bit (either light or dark) using low power, and it writes the data by heating each bit with high power and exposing it to a magnetic field created by an electromagnet next to the laser diode. The heated crystals align with the magnetic field, and set in place as soon as they cool off.

    The only real physical difference between DVD-RWs, DVD-RAMs, MiniDiscs, and medical-grade MO discs is the quality of the liquid crystals.
     
  18. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    5,104
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    STL
    You seem to be confused as to what Magneto-Optical (MO) is. DVD-RAM is NOT MO.

    MO: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Magneto-optical

    DVD-RAM is a phase-change medium, just like DVD+/-R/RW and CD-R/RW.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-RAM
     

Share This Page