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  1. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    10 Quick Tips to Build Mass
    by Chris Aceto

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    Muscle mass is the straw that stirs the drink in the sport of bodybuilding. Talk all you want about symmetry, shape and definition, but in the final analysis, muscle mass is the defining element of a physique. The mass building equation has three components: a correct diet strategy, hardcore training and high tech supplementation. It;s not rocket science, but there are tricks to it, nonetheless.

    To save you time and trouble, I've complied 10 tips to jump start anabolism and create a positive nitrogen balance - to pack on muscle mass, you need to take in more nitrogen via protein and training than you excrete through the natural metabolic process.



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    1. Emphasize the Negative

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    Muscle growth is the logical byproduct of muscle contraction. Much emphasis is placed on the concentric phase of a lift where the muscle shortens as it contracts. But the stretching of the muscle during the eccentric, or negative, phase where the muscle lengthens while maintaining tension can directly cause muscle hypertrophy, too. Emphasizing the negative is an easy technique to overload muscles and promote radical gains in mass.



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    2. Eat Fish

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    Fish containing higher amounts of fat - salmon, for instance - provide us with the ever popular omega-3 fatty acids. Why is this important? The omega-3s make the muscle more sensitive to insulin; hence, they fuel glycogen storage and amino acid entry into muscles while also preserving glutamine stores.



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    3. Increase Sodium Intake

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    I'm not kidding. Sodium is an essential mineral that is an absolute must for muscle growth. Sodium has a bad rap because it can cause water retention - anathema to contest ready bodybuilders. On the plus side, sodium enhances carbohydrate storage and amino acid absorption while also improving the muscle's responsiveness to insulin.



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    4. Stop All Aerobics

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    Aerobic exercise has a detrimental effect on mass building. Aerobics interfere with strength gains and recovery while burning up valuable glycogen and branched chain amino acids (BCAA). Adding mass is the best way to upgrade your resting metabolic rate (RMR); is the RMR is elevated, more calories are burned and it is easier to stay lean.



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    5. Lift Explosively

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    The amount of force a muscle generates is proportional to the amount of muscle growth you'll be able to create. Force is defined as mass (the weight you use) multiplied by acceleration (the speed at which you push a weight against resistance). To generate more force, then, progressively increase your poundages while lifting explosively - in this context, you actually increase speed during the second half of the rep.



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    6. Dramatically increase your calories for three days

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    You will never achieve a positive nitrogen balance with a low calorie diet. It takes raw materials - carbs, protein and fats - to build new muscle mass and support recovery. Increasing your calories by 50% (from 3,0000 to 4,500 per day, for instance) for three days can spur growth while adding little if any bodyfat. The key is to limit the increased calories to a designated three day period; you'll be able to stimulate growth by improving muscle sensitivity to insulin and by providing more carbs for glycogen storage. If you are in a overtrained state - and if you're not gaining any new muscle mass, this is probably the case - the additional calories will promote anabolism before fat storage is able to kick in. That's why you want to limit the 50% increase to a three day period. After that time, return to your typical intake of daily calories; you'll have stimulated new growth without adding unwanted fat.



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    7. Rest

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    Many bodybuilders are unable to pack on mass because they are always training and, therefore, always recovering from those grueling workouts. Taking a couple of days off can restore glycogen, increase anabolism and allow hormonal indexes such as testosterone and cortisol to return to optimal levels.



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    8. Eat in the Middle of the Night

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    Anabolism depends on an excess of calories. As you are well aware, bodybuilders eat four to six times per day to increase the absorption of nutrients and to provide a steady influx of carbs, protein and fat. Expanding on the four to six meals per day plan is to include a protein drink in the middle of the night that can encourage additional growth. Glutamine EFX, providing 30 grams of protein and carbs along with the 'big three' (see tip #10), is a good option for this late at night infusion of nutrients.



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    9. Increase Strength Through Powerlifting

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    Your muscles respond to training in three ways. When you train with high reps (more than 15), there is an increase in endurance with no substantive improvement in size or strength. The six to twelve rep range - the range that all big bodybuilders rely on - promotes an increase in both size and strength. Powerlifters generally stay with low reps, two to four per set, which supplements strength with slight variances in size. However, if you set aside one week of training to pile on the weights with low reps the subsequent improvement in strength will make you stronger when you return to the six to twelve rep routine. Here's the formula: More strength equals more tension on the muscle equals more growth.



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    10. Supplement with the Big Three:
    Glutamine, Creatine and BCAA

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    Glutamine is known as the immunity amino. If you are overly stressed from dieting or training, the immune system kicks in, releasing glutamine into the bloodstream. Having low levels of glutamine will inhibit muscle growth - that's why supplementing with glutamine is important.

    Creatine is associate with added power and the ability to produce more adenosine triphosphate (ATP) - the chemical fuel source for training and growth. Supplementing with creatine allows bodybuilders to raise creatine levels in the muscle - therefore enhancing strength and ATP - without the unwanted fat that you'd be saddled with by getting all your creatine exclusively from food.

    Branched chain amino acids act as a handy fuel source when glycogen stores are low. Adding BCAA to your nutritional program will increase your nitrogen balance while preventing the dreaded catabolic state that derives from overtraining or overdieting.



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    This article was published in Flex Magazine,
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 1, 2006
  2. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    The Seven Sacred Rules for
    Packing on Muscle Weight You Should Never Break




    These rules were featured in Ironman Magazine, December 1995 issue.


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    Eat at least five times a day, every two to three hours. You must keep your system saturated with amino acids and glycogen from protein and carb sources, respectively, if you want to push muscle growth to abnormal levels. You never know when your body will need these precious nutrients. What's more, not eating every few hours can cause the starvation mechanism to kick in, which signals your body to begin consuming its own muscle tissue.

    Center your bodybuilding program around the big compound movements, such as squats and presses. You should strive for maximum efficiency of effort, or to work as many muscle groups as possible with as few sets as possible. Squats, for example, train not only your quads but also your lower back and glutes, so direct work for the muscles that assist during the squat should be minimal. This leaves more of your recovery ability to help in the growth process when you're out of the gym.

    Don't do more than 30 all-out work sets at any workout, and less is usually better. Overtraining is the number one reason most bodybuilders can't pack on muscle weight.

    Don't train more than two days in a row. Your muscles aren't the only things that have to recover after a heavy workout; your entire nervous system needs a rest too.

    Have a protein drink immediately after every traning session. Research indicates that boosting insulin levels right after an intense workout promotes muscle protein synthesis, which leads to faster growth.

    Take a break after four to six weeks of high intensity training. Either take a full week off or downshift your intensity for two weeks. This lets you recuperate fully and in many cases promotes a new growth spurt.

    Keep your cruise control on. Try to keep your cool during the day no matter what. Getting overly excited can stress you out and cause excessive energy burn, energy your body could be using to fuel extraordinary muscle growth.
     
  3. Jeff Merr

    Jeff Merr Elite Member

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  4. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    ABB Bodybuilding, Fitness and
    Nutrition Tips

    8 Ways To Fry Your Thighs
    By Mike Matarrazzo, from M&F, Nov 2000



    I come from a boxing background and I like to stay loose, so I will stretch 15-20 minutes before I train quads. I thiknk gorging the muscle with blood is one of the biggest precursors to muscle growth, and the more you stretch the muscle fiber, the more blood it can hold. I start with my quads first, then my hams. Hamstrings are incroporated into a lot of quad movements; if you've ever pulled your hamstring, you know you can't train your quads at all.

    Strict, heavy squats are the way to add quad size. Bit you get to a certain point where you have the right amount of size on your quads and you're just going for more sweep and muscle density. Full range of motion hack squats really hit the outer sweep of the qyad.

    I always like to make sure I never go so heavy that I can't do at least eight reps, and I try to never do more than 15, unless I'm doing it on purpose.

    Since the legs are a very large, dense muscle group, I think it takes many sets to properly work them. i typically do 6-10 sets per exercise, using the first three sets as a semi warm up. I also like to test myself and see how strong I really am and how much I can take. I've learned that doing 6-7 sets really burns my muscles out. I still experience muscle soreness, and I honestly belive it's from doing the extra sets. Precontest, I might do as many as 10 sets of each exercise per bodypart.

    I training quickly and intensely, allowing myself only 7-20 seconds between sets. I feel the leg shouldn't be receoved before the next set; they'll have plenty of time to recover when I get out of the gym. Between sets, I shake the muscle out a bit, just to get the blood in there. I'd never advise this pace for begineers or for those wo want to gain muscle mass. In the end, you need to be very instinctive about your rest intervals, just like other training variables. Find what works for you.

    I don't lock out at the top of squats and leg presses. Tis takes the muscular straing off the muscle and puts too much pressure on the knees themselves, making the joint vulnerable to injury.

    For quad separation, the most important thing is using afull range of motion and really squeezing the muscles. Don't just fly through the exercise; do it at a slower pace and try to hold the weight for as long as possible. I really believe that pulls out the striations and separation.

    My quad workout is very basic, but basic works. The exercises I do are pretty much the same for each workout. My legs fee liek rubber at the end, tending to cramp up if I sit down or get in the car, so I move around for about 15 minutes afterward.
     
  5. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    Nutrition Supplement Bars
    by Alan Sugarman

    PART ONE: GLYCERINE, THE COMPROMISE FOR LOW CARBOHYDRATE.
    Nutrition Bars. Are they really good for you? What are you really getting? In this article, we will focus on the multitude of nutritional supplement bars out there, specifically we will look at the recent trend of high protein, low carbohydrate bars being launched by many of the major companies in the supplement world. Here, we will discuss one of the most popular ways in which people are attempting to get their protein, from bars.

    Let me be blunt, bars are always a nutritional compromise. Why? It is nearly impossible (and no one has really done it yet so maybe it is impossible) to create a supplement bar that is high in good quality protein sources while also containing few carbohydrates while being low fat. Certainly consumers should not equate a nutrition supplement bar to a meal replacement powder. A good MRP will be far better nutritionally than supplement bar. For example, take a look at a 3 Musketeers. It has approximately 8g of fat. Think that is a lot? It is a candy bar right? Well many of the supplement bars out there that are high in protein and low in carbohydrates also contain nearly, if not as much, fat as some candy bars. Granted most candy bars have more carbs, simple sugars, and less protein but are nutrition bars really low in carbs. How do manufacturers get their bars to be low in carbs?

    When attempting to make a high protein bar it is necessary to incorporate something that will keep the bars soft and pliable (read chewable) so they do not become a protein brick necesitating a trip to the local dentist. Glycerine is something companies seem to be using quite a bit. Glycerine and glycerol are one in the same and represent the chemical backbone to which one, two, or three fatty acid side chains are attached to create what we commonly know as fat. Glycerine is generally used to make a bar stay soft, in the face of ever increasing amounts of protein, by trapping water within the bar. The government (FDA) clearly states in the Code of Federal Regulations that glycerine is to be listed as a carbohydrate by "difference". The government does this in order to classify glycerine under one of the three macronutrient categories, fat, carb, or protein.

    Glycerine is not fat since it has no fatty acids. Glycerine is not a protein since it has no amine group (nitrogen containing portion). The only category left is carbohydrates. Look at the label of your favorite high protein low carb bar. Most of them will not be listing glycerine as a carbohydrate. If a company does not list it as a macronutrient then how can a consumer keep track of how much glycerine they are actually getting. Well first we must ask about the fate of glycerine metabolically. Hopefully they are counting the 4.32 calories/g within the total calories stated on the label.

    Ok biochemistry fans, this part is for you. As for the rest of you, please just grin and bear it as this will provide you with the basics of glycerine metabolism. Don't worry it will be over soon. Glycerine can normally come from food sources (via tri-acyl-glycerol a.k.a. fat, phosphosglycerides, glyceryl esters, and other miscilaneous sources), supplements (bars, beverages, or plain straight glycerine) and of course endogenously from the fat liberated from your own personal storage (lucky you). The fate of glycerine once it enters the body is highly variable depending mostly on energy storage status at the time of consumption. Energy storage status is basically how well fed your body is at any given point and time. This does not mean that obese people are always in a high-energy balance. What this does mean is that if you have been eating regularly, or overstuffed your face at Thanksgiving, you are probably in balanced or positive energy balance. The metabolic destinations are numerous and dependent upon this whole energy balance business.

    Some journal articles and textbooks discuss glycerol as a direct precursor for both gluconeogenesis (production of glucose by your body (blood sugar)) and glycolysis (anaerobic portion of energy production within the body). It is common practice for many bar manufacturers to state that "Glycerine is not a carbohydrate but yields 4.32 calories/g", somewhere on their label. Most of you are aware that carbohydrates yield about 4 calories/g, so if glycerine does yield 4.32 calories/g there is only a small difference in calories between regular carbohydrates and glycerine. So glycerine must be a carbohydrate right, well sometimes. Recent research has shown that glycerine does not significantly elevate blood insulin levels and only minimally elevates blood sugar levels. Most interesting is that some of this research was done following a 36 hour fast, and if glycerine really was gluconeogenic you would think that blood glucose levels would have increased when glycerine was administered after the fast. Fasting for 36 hours would lower the bodies glycogen stores (as well as make you pretty cranky and hungry), therefore since glycerine did not affect blood glucose or insulin levels it is difficult to conclude that glycerine is a carbohydrate.

    The research that is available is not conclusive with regard to the gluconeogenic properties of glycerine. By definition glycerine is a trihydric alcohol and is the building block of all plant oils and nearly all animal fats. Glycerine can be incorporated into fat production by providing the backbone for fatty acids to attach onto and create what we know as fat. Another possible destination within the body is that glycerine can become part of phospoglycerides (cell membrane compounds). Orally administered glycerine has also been found in the urine meaning that some of it is actually excreted without being utilized. Ok, so glycerine can be a carb on occasion, a fat precursor on occasion, a phosphoglyceride precursor on occasion, and it can simply pass through the body unused. Wow, that is a lot of possibilities for one compound. Glycerine does have a few other interesting properties worth noting.

    When administered orally, glycerine has a hydrating/dehydrating effect. This is based on the fact that glycerine has an ability to hold onto water. Glycerine's water binding ability helps keep bars soft and also may be of benefit to endurance athletes and bodybuilders alike. Endurance athletes can utilize glycerine in conjunction with extra water prior to an event in order to support hydration and therefore enhance performance. The recommended dosage for accomplishing superhydration ranges and each individual should experiment sufficiently prior to use during competition. For reference start with approximately 1-gram glycerine per kilogram body weight along with an additional 1.5L - 2.0L of water, consumed 1 - 4 hours prior to the event. Interestingly bodybuilders might consider taking glycerine prior to their stage appearance in lower dosages without consuming the additional water to "dry out". Leaving the water out of the equation may cause a shift of existing body water temporarily out of the tissues and into the blood. While this may work to obtain the shrink wrapped look you should definitely test it out prior to the day of the show to see how you react. Glycerine supplementation will not help those who have failed to diet properly and are covered by a small layer of blubber. Proper precaution should be taken if you are going to utilize glycerine. Notify someone you know and trust that is going to attend the show so they can help you if you begin to cramp up. Enough digression back to the subject.

    Now that you have a thorough understanding of the complex utilization, or lack there of, as well as some of the unique useful ergogenic effects of glycerine, what does all of this mean for the bar eater. Well as stated bars are a compromise, and in the process of that give and take companies must use things like glycerine to make their product palatable. The government has yet to come after any of the companies not labeling glycerine as a carbohydrate and may never. Unfortunately the consumer is left not knowing how much glycerine they may be getting in their favorite bar. Hey, call them up and ask if it you want to know and it is not on the label. Any reputable company will gladly provide the info.

    Is the consuming of glycerine a negative thing? No, not really, however for those of you attempting to monitor your daily nutrient intake, you should be aware of how glycerol can affect your individual body chemistry and most importantly your goals. Consuming a bar once in a while when you are in a hurry is certainly preferential to say a Big Mac, but bars are by no means equivalent to a good meal replacement powder or a well balanced meal of (oh my!) real food. There are other things to watch out for in your nutrition bars. For instance, the type of sweetener and fat used in the bar. Often the protein sources are far inferior to what you would get in a meal replacement powder.
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  6. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    PART TWO: THE COMPROMISE ON SWEETENER, PROTEIN, AND FAT.

    Ok, now that you know your supplement bar probably contains some form of sugar alcohol, glycerol being the most likely of the bunch, what about the other drawbacks I mentioned last month. Many companies are making bars that taste almost like a candy bar these days, sure many are low in carbohydrate as discussed last month, still others are not, and many probably contain a compromise in the type of sweetener they are using. You might also have noted that many of the labels for the so called supplement bars are sporting a hefty 7 - 9 grams of wonderfully tasting fat. What about all this hype surrounding the "high protein" content of these bars? Oh, I think you are going to like this little ditty (this whole bar issue really peeves me sometimes)

    Let's start with the sweetener of the day. Fructose. Ah the lovely little byproduct of corn production. Look around you. It is everywhere. High fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, corn syrup solids, corn sweetener, sucrose (½ fructose), fruit sweetener, etc. all of which when found on a label should scream to you, "HEY THIS IS FRUCTOSE". Fructose is sweeter tasting than regular sucrose (table sugar) and cheaper and sweeter than glucose (which is a better choice for a human/bodybuilder to consume). In an effort to sweeten their bar, and make it taste good, as well as keep costs down, companies will often use some form of fructose in their bars. What's the big deal you say? Allow me to elaborate a bit.

    Biochemistry time again folks. You see your muscles cannot use fructose, at least directly. When you eat fructose and it enters the blood stream the liver is where it gets sucked up. Your liver has a love affair with fructose and like the movie "Fatal Attraction" just has to have it all to itself. Glucose is the preferred fuel for your working muscles. Once fructose is in the liver is does not leave and is eventually either converted to glycogen (long chains of glucose units that acts as long term sugar storage that can be exported from the liver to the brain and muscles on demand) or go towards producing cholesterol and fat. Well at least one of the three options, glycogen production, is beneficial. Think one out of three isn't bad, think again. The body is more likely to convert the fructose to fat and VLDL cholesterol in persons who have filled their glycogen stores by eating regular meals that contain other carbohydrates, because once your storage of liver glycogen is full the fructose has no place else to go. So let us say you eat a normal meal. The meal will likely have both complex and simple carbs and may contain some fructose.

    Those complex and simple carbs might just fill up your glycogen stores (your muscles can and will take up glucose from the blood if they need it or their glycogen storage is low) then you are left with fructose having nowhere to go but towards fat and cholesterol. Scared yet? Well it is not all bad, because the liver does like fructose so much so that it is better at replenishing liver (not muscle) glycogen than glucose, about 50% better (mostly because fructose is pulled out of the blood into the liver so easily while glucose can pass on by and be utilized by the muscles and other tissues). Therefore, fructose would be ok for someone who is an ultraendurance athlete with very low glycogen stores that wants to replenish their supply of liver glycogen. On the bodybuilding side of the coin, I know some people that use fructose as part of their carbing up cycle (works for some and not so much for others). Overall, if you are trying to lose body fat, fructose is something you probably can do without.

    The fat content of supplement bars is often as high or higher than some candy bars. What do companies think we are dumbbells, "dah nope those are them things we lift in the gym". Well some of us must either not care or actually are dumbbells because these bars are selling and more are coming out every day. Try this, next time you are in the checkout line at your local feed store, pick up some of the "candy bars". Don't be surprised when some of them have as little, I mean as much fat as your favorite supplement bar. Not impressed yet, think that your supplement bar has "better fat" than those candy bars? Think again. Often the fat in candy bars is from very similar sources as to those found in your favorite supplement bar, cocoa butter from the chocolate coating, cotton seed oil, fractionated vegetable oils, fractionated palm oil, hydrogenated oils, etc. All of these are pretty much on the bad side of the coin. Sure some use canola oil, essential fatty acid mixtures and other fancy names for fat be it good or bad. Most of these supplement bars that do contain some good fat still have more fat than you will find in a good meal supplement powder. So here you are trying to get a healthy, convenient, meal alternative, and they give you a high protein "candy bar". This is one of the reasons I always say a bar is not a replacement for a good meal supplement powder. Check out the labels for yourself and then think twice about shoving a couple bars down your throat when you are trying to stay lean or diet down.
     
  7. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    Another issue worth mentioning is the cholesterol content of these bars. Someone please explain to me how you can have a whey protein concentrate, milk protein concentrate, or some other milk protein source and list 0mg of cholesterol on the label. If the company is using a whey isolate or calcium or sodium caseinate, both of which have fairly low cholesterol, for most their protein I might understand, but some of the companies making bars actually expect us to believe they have 0mg of cholesterol. Honestly, they must really think we are stupid or something. While 0mg cholesterol looks great on the label it is not and cannot likely be the truth. Some bars may only have 5mg or 10mg but why lie about it and deceive consumers and those keeping track of their cholesterol for health reasons. Sorry, in my book that is just plain wrong. Call up the manufacturer of your 0mg cholesterol bars and make them explain to you how this is possible. Send their response to my email (listed at then end of this column). I just have to hear what some of these folks will come up with to cover their proverbial hind sides. The only logical explanation they could have is that they are really not using very much of the milk proteins and are therefore they might be telling the truth about the cholesterol content. Now that would be an honest and probably unlikely response. If you do call them up and can't get a response, or get an unsatisfactory response maybe you ought to find another companies bar to purchase. This all leads me to the familiar (for those of you who read my little column regularly see September 1999 Volume 4 Number 7)) world of proteins.

    Many of today's supplement bars proudly proclaim "high protein" content and herein lies one of the greatest of all compromises. Back in the day when high protein bars were hard and chewy instead of the now soft and easily chewed bars (some anyway), soy protein was often used to make up much of the protein found in supplement bars. Today you will find such things as hydrolysed whey protein (might be expensive might not), whey protein isolate (fairly expensive), caseinates (a little cheaper than WPI), whey protein concentrates (pretty inexpensive), soy protein isolates (ranges greatly but about the same as WPC), hydrolysed protein (usually cheap low quality protein most often collagen) and occasionally egg or beef protein. Hydrolysed collagen is often used in bars because it is one protein that does not get hard as the bar ages, is inexpensive, and does not taste bad. Collagen is not a biologically high quality protein, meaning its' amino acid profile is not optimal for humans.

    So, one of the major protein sources in your bar might be collagen, or some slightly hydrolyzed whey protein concentrate, better biologically speaking. You might find some calcium caseinate, some whey protein concentrate, some soy protein isolate, and a little of this and a little of that. Now pick up your favorite meal supplement powder. If it is any good it will mainly be composed of a whey protein concentrate or isolate and possibly some type of caseinate. Incidentally, I recently read an article in a popular magazine saying casein is inferior to whey and is a cheap way for companies to fill in protein rather than using whey in their meal supplement powders. This is far from the whole truth. While whey is absorbed more quickly into the body and promotes protein synthesis better than casein, whey is also subjected to higher rates of hepatic amino acid oxidation. The liver is partly responsible for maintaining amino acid balance in the blood and when it senses a sudden rise in blood amino acids it will start oxidizing them to bring the level back to normal. Casein's amino acids, on the other hand, are not subjected to as much liver oxidation because casein is absorbed more slowly and the amino acids enter the blood at a slower rate. Recent studies show a combination of whey and casein to act most effectively for promoting protein synthesis while minimizing liver oxidation. Hey that's funny, cows milk is a mixture of both casein and whey and baby calves grow like crazy on the stuff. Hmmm? Sorry for the tangent but as I said some of this stuff peeves me and I felt it was necessary to clarify. The point is that your supplement bar does not and probably cannot contain the protein profile that is optimal (at least no one has done it yet). Your high protein bar is going to have protein for sure, but it is going to be a non-optimal compilation of protein sources that to date cannot match the quality of proteins found in a good meal supplement powder. Keep that in mind when you reach for a good tasting (usually because of the extra fat), high protein (not necessarily high quality) supplement bar instead of a meal supplement powder.

    The tale of the tape here is that supplement bars are definitely a compromise on optimum nutritional content. Bars are a source of food yes, but so is a Big Mac, fries, and a milk shake and you don't go out and eat that, hopefully not regularly. Think of supplement bars as a healthy alternative to eating a triple chocolate cake for desert. At least most are fortified with a vitamin mineral premix. By the way some of these bars are getting up their in size and therefore calorie content so you might actually be getting a deserts worth of calories and fat in one of these supplement bars. Just be aware that simply because the supplement bar has pretty packaging that screams "HEY BOZO, I'M HEALTY BUY ME" does not make it so. Read the label, call the company, know what you are getting and you will not end up with a clown sized midsection in the process. Till next month.

    "Train Hard, Eat Right, Rest Well"






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    Alan Shugarman, M.S., R.D. has been involved in the health and fitness industry for the past ten years. Originally from California, he owned a supplement wholesale business for six years. He acquired his Bachelors of Science degree in Chemistry and Biology with a minor in Nutrition and subsequently obtained a Masters of Science in Foods and Nutrition Science. Along with his Masters, Alan is also a Registered Dietitian through the American Dietetic Association. Alan has lectured on many nutrition, supplement, health, and fitness related topics at the university level as well as speaking at seminars for private businesses. He has also written numerous articles for publication in print media. Currently he is the Director of Research and Product Development at Weider Nutrition International in Salt Lake City, Utah.
     
  8. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    The 10 Biggest Mistakes you can make with you Bodybuilding Diet
    By Chris Aceto

    This article was featured in Flex Magazine, July 1997 issue. For more information on how to subscribe to Flex, please take a look at our Magazine section.

    Success leaves clues. Ask any top professionals, including bodybuilders, "How can I maximize my progress?" and the best answer will delineate not only the right steps to take but also the pitfalls to avoid.

    My goal is to share with you the nutrition lessons I've learned through developing eating regimens for several top bodybuilders, some of whom are now in the professional ranks. My hope is that these tips will allow you to correct any flaws in your nutrition program and hence maximize your progress. Here are the 10 biggest mistakes to avoid if you want to fulfill your bodybuilding potential.



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    1. Dieting impatiently

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    Many bodybuilders jump from one diet to another without ever giving the initial program enough time to work. It takes at least three weeks for your body to adapt to dietary modifications. If you start a high carb, moderate protein, low fat diet with reduced calories, and your goal is to lose fat, expect to notice visible changes after approximately 21 days. Don't anticipate immediate changes in your physique.



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    2. Failing to Accurately track calories

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    Be sure to count not only calories but carbohydrates, proteins and fats as well. Because they don't keep a record of what they're eating, many bodybuilders don't lose fat at the rate they expect, while others fail to gain weight. Don't make the mistake of miscalculating your calorie intake. Successful bodybuilders keep precise records; they don't guess or estimate. Consult the Nutrition Almanac or a comparable source for food values and buy a scale.



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    3. Eating haphazardly

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    Whether you're trying to lose fat or add lean body mass, consistency is key, and sporadic eating is anathema to making progress. If you're a hardgainer or you have a difficult time getting ripped, the five times a day meal plan is best. This approach (a meal every two or three hours) inhibits storage of fat and increases lean body mass by enhancing nutrient absorption.



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    4. Depending on the scale to gauge progress

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    Don't depend solely on the scale to fine tune your diet. When bodybuilders try to add size, they often become discouraged when their bodyweight doesn't increase rapidly. They frequently jump the gun by adding too many calories to accelerate their progress. Similarly, precontest competitors striving to get down in size sometimes subtract too many calories. While the scale and other measuring devices like bodyfat calipers are effective tools, it's better to rely on photos and an unbiased eye to measure your progress. After all, bodybuilding is a visual sport. If you look leaner and fuller, then your fat loss diet is probably working - even if the scale and bodyfat calipers don't agree.



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    5. Overeating (especially carbohydrates)

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    Athletes who try to add mass often go overboard and eat an excessive number of calories, which are then converted into bodyfat. Then there are bodybuilders who eat a very low fat diet but still gain too many bodyfat because of an extremely high intake of carbohydrates. Sure, carbs are required for hard training, and they aid in recovery, But once the body absorbs what it needs, the excess will be quickly deposited as fat.



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    6. Failing to personalize your bodybuilding diet.

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    There's nothing wrong with learning from what the pro bodybuilders do. However, Dorian Yate's diet is vastly different from Nasser El Sonbaty's. What they have in common is an individualized, or customized approach. Dorian's diet might not work for Nasser's, and vice versa. Maintaining detailed records of what you eat and how you react to those foods can help you customize a diet that's ideal for your needs.



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    7. Viewing supplements as a magic bullet

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    Some bodybuilders try to shed fat by taking carnitine and chromium, yet they fail to initiate the fat burning process by lowering their caloric consumption. Others use creatine, glutamine or branched chain amino acids to beef up, but fail to consume enough calories and proteins to stimulate a positive nitrogen balance. Supplements work to enhance a nutrition program, not to make up for poor planning and nutritional mistakes.



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    8. Becoming a slave to canned tuna

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    To be successful, you have to eat the right way all the time. I've known athletes who burn out from the boredom of eating nothing but plain chicken breasts and tuna straight out of the can. Laura Creavalle's cookbook, The Lite Lifestyle, contains 150 fat free and sugar free recipes designed for precontest bodybuilders. These recipes allow you to stick with your eating program for the long haul, which produces substantive results.



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    9. Eliminating all Fat

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    Cutting fat from your diet is helpful in controlling total caloric intake, but removing fat completely from your diet and relying exclusively on very low fat or fat free proteins like turkey, fish and protein powders can lead to a decrease in fat metabolism and/or retard growth. A low fat diet that includes essential fatty acids found in meat, chicken and fish is useful in promoting optimal recovery growth and fat metabolism.



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    10. Making enormous changes all at once

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    When adding or subtracting calories from your diet, try to make very small incremental changes to allow your body to adapt these dietary manipulations. Severe reductions in calories will cause the body to hoard fat; an abundant increase will stimulate fat storage.
     
  9. divisionE

    divisionE Guest

    Here it is some very helpful information
     
  10. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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  11. JAFAR

    JAFAR FPS whore OT Supporter

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  12. joy division

    joy division New Member

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    :hsugh: all 9 of your posts are in this thread?
     
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