Going to school for Network Administration?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by IceMurder, Aug 12, 2007.

  1. IceMurder

    IceMurder Guest

    Anyone here in the field? How do you like it? Hows the job/training? Usual Pay?
     
  2. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Nobody really goes to school for something that specific anymore. Companies know they need a flexible IT department. Get a degree in CS, or at least IT.
     
  3. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    BS in CS for me
     
  4. Penguin Man

    Penguin Man Protect Your Digital Liberties

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    Yeah, all the best system and network admins that I know are CS grads.
     
  5. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    you could go with computer infomation systems with cisco networking option

    i did...but i regret it, cause i hate cisco now
     
  6. grocerylist

    grocerylist New Member

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    Why the hate for Cisco?
     
  7. pyehac

    pyehac if she's old enough to cross the street, she's old

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    I did, no one wants to hire me because I have no experience (other than school). Workingg as a computer tech FTL.
     
  8. IceMurder

    IceMurder Guest

    not what i wanted to hear :( ive already registered for my classes...but i mean i guess i can always use them for something else and change majors next semester or something :dunno:
     
  9. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Oh my god. :eek3: I just gave someone education advice and nobody body-checked me for it!

    :dance:
     
  10. Sexual Vanilla

    Sexual Vanilla New Member

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    Motherfucking .

    Just graduated with a CIS degree with networking emphasis...but, the caveat is the fact that I have marginal work experience. Therefore, I'm stuck at a help desk position while the people with "certifications" rake in the dough.
     
  11. Doc Brown

    Doc Brown Don't make me make you my hobby

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    :rofl:
     
  12. Neuman

    Neuman New Member

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    i'd definitely recommend getting some student position at your university's IT department, or do a summer internship, or anything to get a foot in the door towards some remedial IT work experience that you can put on your resume.

    i'm in a similar position of lack of work experience....i got offered a helpdesk style position when i was finishing up my BS...which is basically what i was trying to avoid by going to school for 4 years. going on to get some more EDU at the mo ment but am going to put a lot of effort into gettin some hands on experience.

    good luck!

    edit: from what i have experience the IT field is more of a "show me what you've done" field, as compared to "what you've studied".
     
  13. Cthalupa

    Cthalupa New Member

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    If you're going into networking, find a local community college that has a lab and offers the courses. Get a lot of lab experience, and don't be afraid to put that on your resume - you configure the networks the same way in the lab you will in real life. At least, if your instructors are worth their pay, you will be. The Cisco academy labs aren't bad, either.

    You're going to be taking that support job in the NOC. It happens. But that's life. Get it under your belt, and then you'll have the experience to move on to better things.


    But Neuman is right - to the people doing the hiring, they're after experience. They want things done, and they want them done sooner rather than later - experience shows you've done it.
     
  14. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    I don't know any admins with CS degrees. Why spend all that time on theory and then not use it?
     
  15. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    All the admins I know have CS degrees. They all ended up as admins after deciding they'd rather fuck around with hardware instead of writing code.

    The state of the art in IT is so tied to whatever equipment Company X is selling at any given time that it's pretty much impossible to take any kind of meaningful classes as training, but companies still want to have some kind of piece of paper waved in their faces, so a CS degree is about as close as you can get to an IT degree.

    Besides, the really valuable thing about college degrees, for companies that are worth working for anyway, is that a college degree means that you've spent at least four years in an environment where you had to put up with other people's strongly-different opinions and find ways to work with them on projects anyway. Not only does that kind of experience broaden your mind, it also gets you ready for the real world. Certifications can get you a job right now, but they're not a long-term solution because they don't demonstrate anything other than capability in a very specific slice of the discipline -- they certainly don't imply any social grace.
     
  16. Leb_CRX

    Leb_CRX OT's resident terrorist

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    /me body-checks deusexaethera
     
  17. WooleyBooger

    WooleyBooger OT Supporter

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    My experience in the mid-sized town i live in is...they look for "what you've done", but pay based on "what paper you have". No certs/degree...no money :wtc:

    I have plenty of experience doing my current job, but since i don't have any formal training i'm under paid. However they are trying to move me into a net admin position, and are sending me to an MCSA boot camp in Oct.

    Speaking of...any advice from you guys who have been to the MCSA/MCSE boot camps?
     
  18. Kieffer87

    Kieffer87 Orly OT Supporter

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    I'm currently a CS major and have been working as a student IT. 2 of the other students I worked with just graduated with same or similar degrees. One started off at 43k a year and the other was 35-40k a year.
     
  19. pyehac

    pyehac if she's old enough to cross the street, she's old

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    The key in some computer positions is experience. You can have 5 BSs, A+, Cisco, Microsoft, Novell, OT, Karate certifications, but if you can't built a house out of a pile if shit, you're nothing.
     
  20. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    What has hardware got to do with it? Since when are admins hardware engineers? Thats EE. Thats something else. Or do you mean PC Tech, who fixes PCs?

    Actually competent admins that do something other than install Windows all day get off on building things by harnessing existing systems, using (mostly) declarative programming. Its not overly different from what developer's do, actually, but since the focus is on declarative programming in many, many languages (or many menus), college isn't as critical as experience. But other than plugging things in, I don't see that there's much to it in a hardware sense.

    But I agree with the pay thing. The degree is worth it just to start higher, or accelerate faster, on the pay scale. For most people.

    But I wouldn't really get a CS degree, necessarily. There are CIS or MIS degrees that might be better suited.
     
  21. dolphindojo

    dolphindojo New Member

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    I'm an MIS major and you are correct for the most past. Computer Science is great, but MIS/CIS is also equally great and has more of an emphasis on "soft skills" and business, not programming. So if you are straight out of college, MIS might actually even prepare you better for the real world.
     
  22. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Do you need to know about pointers to be a good admin?

    ;)
     
  23. WooleyBooger

    WooleyBooger OT Supporter

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    Lets hear em...
     
  24. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    Fuck no, I hate talking about pointers. They freak me out.
     
  25. Drifter87

    Drifter87 Yippi-kay-ay, Motherfucker

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    I'm a Networking Security and System Administrator (NSSA) Major. I'm just starting my 3rd year of college.

    I just got a raise to $25/hr and I do a combination of Programing and Networking right now, and yes I am just an Intern.

    All of the IT departments I talk to (well they get really excited when they find out I'm NSSA), say within 5 years you can make 6 figures and because I already have 5 years work experiences I can probably make more when I start then the next guy.
     

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