A&P Going to be driving from NY to AZ soon

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by SaMMy SiZZLe, Dec 21, 2008.

  1. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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    Anywhere I should stop for good photo ops ? :x:
     
  2. Gerbonium

    Gerbonium OT Supporter

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    what roads u taking?
     
  3. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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  4. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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    i think we're also gonna stop in cleveland for a few hours to see a friend if there is anything interesting there
     
  5. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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    if it snows we're taking i-81 to i-40
     
  6. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    The Southwest is a great place for landscape photography, and the people here can make colorful subjects. The I-40 runs close to the old Rt. 66 route, so old motels, gas stations, and other Rt. 66 attractions will be within easy reach. You might want to spend a couple of days around Albuquerque to enable you to visit and photograph in Taos and Santa Fe. Just take the I-25 north for about 65 miles. I-25 parallels the Rio Grande and passes through several Pueblo reservations. Taking photographs on reservations here requires a permit from the individual tribes. I'm uncertain what the current rates are.

    Leaving Albuquerque going west on I-40, you will pass Acoma Pueblo and this one you won't want to miss. Acoma sits on very picturesqe mesa in a valley surrounded by just the sort of features one imagines the whole southwest to look like. From the information center where you get your photo permit, the tribe runs a bus up to the Pueblo and a guided tour of the place. Acoma is one of the most traditional of the Pueblos and hasn't changed much in the past 100 years. About 300 people still live there without running water or electricity. Acoma's church is a fine representation of Southwestern church architecture, and the views from the top of the mesa are fantastic. The people are very friendly and used to tourist behavior, so the whole experience is unlikely to be marred.

    Leaving Acoma, you might go through the Malpi, or bad lands. Off to the north you will see Mt. Taylor, one of the four great spiritual landmarks for many of the local tribes. Mt. Taylor is a dormant volcano, and the Malpi is largely the result of volcanic actions. Just off the road in the Malpi is a natural stone bridge with a well marked trail leading up to it. Back on the I-40 going west you'll go through Grants, NM. There are several reasonably good restaurants there, and a very good Visitor's Center with loads of information about the area. Ask about the Navajo rug auctions held at Crown Point. Crown Point is a bit off the road, but is known for the auction of Navajo rugs at the local school house where many weavers sell their first weaving efforts. On a good night you might be able to get an incredible bargain because the quality tends to be very high, and the prices modest since the place is off the beaten tourist track. If you continue north along that route you will end up at Farmington, near the four corners and Shiprock. Along that route you will pass near Chaco Canyon, and important prehistoric, pueblo site and the Besti Wilderness, a fantastic landscape that is a favorite of photographers. Shiprock is another sacred place to the Indians of our part of the country and can bee seen for miles. Going west This alternate route (Rt. 64 and 160 at Teek Nos Pos) will take you through Navajo country to Tuba City. Monument Valley, made famous by John Ford's western films, is close to Keyenta. This route will give you a far better idea of the distances and beauties of our land than almost any other. Be sure your gas tank is full, and that you have water and snacks because its a long, long way beteen places on the Res.

    Gallup, NM is a major center for Indian silver and weaving, so it also is a pretty good place to shop ... and find interesting people shots. Leaving New Mexico, you'll be traveling across northern Arizona and the Navajo Reservation. Go south to Showlow and the white mountains where trout filled streams flow through dense pine forests. This is a favorite local getaway. You can also take an alternate route off of I-40 that will lead up toward Tuba City. You may want to go up to Keyenta and Monument Valley if you have the time. Another side trip from Tuba City would be up to Second Mesa, home of some of the best Hopi craftsmen. This route is faster than the Rt. 64 & 160, but has fewer photo ops.

    From Tuba City, you'll continue southwest to the end of the Navajo Trail (160). Turn left on 89 and then right on 64, a distance of about 30 miles, and 64 will carry you along the south rim of the Grand Canyon. Most people come up from Williams, AZ, see the Canyon and return the way they came in. This route is many, many times longer and has far better photo opportunities. Rt. 64 going west along the Canyon leads to the popular Grand Canyon Visitor's Center, and then continues south to Williams, Az. From Rt. 64 going west, you will be approaching San Francisco Peak, a sacred site to the Navajo, Hopi and other tribes living in the area. Only from the North side of the Grand Canyon are the views better than Driving the full length of Rt. 64. If you can do it this longer route is recommended.

    From Williams, Az, you're back on the I-40 going west into California. At Kingman, Az, you may choose another "side trip" to Hoover Dam-Lake Meade and then on up to Las Vegas. From Las Vegas its an easy, fast freeway (I-15) virtually straight into Barstow. If you stay on I-40, it will take you across the Colorado along the south side of the Mojave National Preserve (I-15 skirts the northern side of the Preserve). Personally, I don't think you'll find as many photo ops on I-40 to Barstow, as along the alternate I've mentioned from Kingman.

    From Barstow you'll be taking the I-15 right into L.A.

    To get into southern Arizona, you'll go east on the I-40 to Flagstaff, and then take the I-17 into Phoenix. The most common side trips are along a side road (89A) that passes through Sedona, Jerome, and Prescott. Sedona is a well-known destination for yuppies and folks who believe in New Age spiritualism. It is nestled in a beautiful landscape reminiscent of the Grand Canyon, but on a more human scale. Jerome is a "ghost town" that refuses to die and maintains itself by attracting tourists to some of the best maintained Old West structures in Arizona. Its on a steep hill, so don't do this if your car isn't up to a rigorous climb. Prescott is another, but more accesible artifact of the Old West. 89A paralells the I-17 and eventually rejoins it above Phoenix. Slower, but with many more photo ops than the main drag.

    South of Phoenix is Tucson and the southeastern corner of Arizona. This quadrent of the State is filled with interesting and beautiful photo ops. Well, that's enough to give you a start.
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2008
  7. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    Good GOD thats going to be a long drive. I drove from Austin to Phoenix and that was a bitch, can't imagine how that'll be. :o
     
  8. wrong1

    wrong1 Member

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    i drove from mass to vegas to norco once... We went south to tennesse, then took the 40 all the way across. This is important... Make sure you cross from New mex into AZ at sunrise. I did, when I saw it... bricks were shat. In my opinion the things I saw that morning were greater than anything else that I saw for the entire trip. It almost made driving 3500 miles in a camaro worth while....
     
  9. Girth

    Girth ¯\_(ツ)_/¯ OT Supporter

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    def not south arizona... that shit is boring.
     
  10. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    That southern route, much of which is on the I-10, is a killer. Long, straight, and flat for hundreds of miles at a time. The Alamo and River Walk in San Antonio are good places to take pictures, but getting there from Dallas adds to the overall length of the trip. My family is from Southwest Texas (Sonora and Menard), but that was a few generations ago. Now I'm not as familiar with Southwest Texas, and have few recommendations for the area. However, the El Paso area has many excellent opportunities for photographers, and its near the White Sands Missile Range (be sure to have your auto registration, proof of insurance, and photo ID to get onto the Range). Carlsbad Caverns is way down in the SE corner of New Mexico. Roswell and Lincoln County (Billy the Kid country) are popular places, but a bit off the track for anyone driving from New York to Arizona. Normally, from El Paso a person would drive west along the I-10 through Las Cruces, Demming, etc. Not much to see along that route until you almost reach Arizona. A detour south along Highway 80 leads to Cochise County in the extreme SE corner of Arizona. That is Apache country, and where I grew up. Lots to see and photograph there. Bisbee is a historic town that grew out of the copper mining industry, and is today a thriving art community. One might want to visit the Cochise Stronghold, where the great Apache chief holed up safe from any attack. The Wonderland of Rocks is an interesting place where fantastic rock formations make good photo subjects. Between Bisbee and Benson, there is Tombstone. Tombstone became the cosmopolitan city of the southwest after silver was discovered there. Almost any famous character you might name from the Old West was in Tombstone at one time or another. Today it is a tourist Mecca that bears little resemblence to the town I knew as a child. Oh well, still a popular place to see and photograph. From Benson, to Tucson is just a short distance, and Tucson is another place from which many short side trips lead to places that might interest a photographer.

    The northern route is the more scenic in my opinion.
     
  11. wrong1

    wrong1 Member

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    Ya it was on the northern side, I'm pretty sure it was the 40? But it was so long ago... not totally sure. What was so amazing to me was the desert plateaus... the colors and rock formations along with the amazing sunrise. If he's been in NY his whole life... or at least never seen that sort of thing.... Its an amazing sight.
     
  12. Asherman

    Asherman New Member

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    The I-40 is the northern route. We have a whole lot of sky, and it is beautiful almost all the time. Sunrise and sunsets are particularly colorful and dramatic. The nightsky over much of the Southwest is a revelation of stars. There is something magical watching a rainstorm slowly move across the mesas fifty miles away. We are very water conscious here, and much of the culture is rain related. So thunder and lightening storms to us are truly awe inspiring. A whole year's rain might fall in the space of a quarter hour, and two hours later the land will be dry again. During those brief periods, the desert blooms and comes alive with flowers, insects, and even tiny frogs. Here we are almost always conscious of the sky. Outside my window now the Sandias are covered with snow, and further north up around Santa Fe/Taos there's even more of the white stuff. I can't imagine living as well anywhere else.
     
  13. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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    Thanks everyone ! I'll post pics when I return
     
  14. SaMMy SiZZLe

    SaMMy SiZZLe New Member

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    I've actually been living in AZ for the past month or so but I haven't seen much besides what's around where I am. Me and my SO are going home for the week by plane and driving back.
     
  15. Astro

    Astro Code Monkey

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    Only a couple hours in Cleveland? Hmm... Probably not much to shoot.

    The canal and MetroParks can be pretty photogenic depending on when you go (winter time probably not ideal). Otherwise, you have downtown Cleveland. If you are going during the holidays, they have the Terminal Tower lit up as well as Public Square. These might make for nice night shots versus trying to shoot during the day when it is gray out.

    Google maps shows you will be cutting through Akron. A couple hours to the east and you have some of Amish country. Akron itself isn't all that exciting, especially right now with some of the rebuilding they are doing. The Akron Art Museum has "Heresies: A Retrospective" by Pedro Meyer which was really pretty awesome to see the final photo and the photos shot to make up the final photo. The individual photos taken to make the composite are also on display. This might get the creative juices going a bit if you're in town in time. It is a small museum. If you target this and "Machines at Play" you probably could be in and out in 30 to 45 minutes.
     

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