GNU License

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by hsmith, Aug 29, 2006.

  1. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    If i use a library that is under the GNU license, all that means is if i make changes or distribute my product, I must supply them with the code for that library only, correct?
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    as long as that library remains independent from your application, yes.
     
  3. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    yeah, i just call methods in it, i am not integrating it.
     
  4. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    If the libraries under the GNU GPL, and not the GNU LGPL ("lesser general public license"), then just by calling methods I think your programs a derivative work aaaand:
    I dunno if I picked the right quote, but the bottom of the GPL says this anyhow (this'd be a note to people using/considering the GPL):
    So if the libraries not under the LGPL.......
     
  5. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

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    yeah it is under the lgpl


    from their forums:

     
  6. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    Keep in mind, forum posts will not keep you out of legal jeapordy. The license is what governs your use of their product. If you don't understand the language in the license and want to be 100% sure you are ok....consult an attorney.
     
  7. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Incorrect. the GNU GPL is written so that a library with only method calls does NOT require the calling product to be released under any GPL/GNU license -- it can be fully commercial with all rights reserved.

    GNU was "forced" to do this. If they didn't, then practically no one would use their libraries.
     
  8. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    Well I said "I think" because I wasn't sure. Can you gimme quotes from the GPL so?

    I asked the guys in #gnu in irc.freenode.net and got a few fairly definite "Yes"es (program making method calls to a GPLed library = derivative work), I think you're wrong jolly :p (nothing wrong with that of course. usually)
    Isn't that why they released the LGPL?

    GPL != LGPL
     
    Last edited: Aug 29, 2006
  9. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    yes, I can:

    You can make ANY changes to the GPL work, and release YOUR CHANGES under any license.

    This is possibly more appropriate:

    Basically a Library, even if under GPL (and not LGPL) is it's own entity. You can have it as a dependency, but that does not make it part of your product -- it is it's own. As an example, many parts of Linux, such as the kernel, are GPL, and are required to use commercial software for the platform -- but that does not require the software to be GPL.

    I can write a commercial web-based service and run it on a GPL webserver, such as apache without conflict -- even though my product may require apache, I do not have to release MY code under GPL.
     
  10. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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    I dunno if that's what the law says. Are you aware of the Linux "binary blob" issue?
    (Novell and probably other distributors have stopped distributing binary blobs because of this)

    If that argument stands, then "compiling against" i.e. linking with any GPLed program/library makes the program a derivative work (it is your code, but your code is a derivative work of a GPLed program, so it's terms apply).
    But the programs are compiled against glibc (generally) which is licensed under the LGPL. Apparantly, compiling against a library (statically and dynamically as I understand) makes the program a derivative work of the library.
    I guess the web-server would be a little like an interpreter:
     

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