Glute stretches

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Ricey McRicerton, Dec 19, 2005.

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  1. Ricey McRicerton

    Ricey McRicerton New Member

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    I had neglected my legs for a long time, and now I'm trying to make sure that I work them just as much as everything else.

    Doing squats and lunges have started absolutely killing my glutes and hamstrings even if I go fairly light. I can stretch my hamstrings just fine, but I can't seem to find a single stretch that helps my glutes.

    Any advice on a good stretch for them? Where my ass meets my legs is killing me today and I've gotta do something to help it.
     
  2. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    stretching doesn't help soreness
     
  3. Chalkitup

    Chalkitup New Member

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    Sit flat on the floor with both legs extended in front of you. Take your right leg and cross it so that your right ankle is next to your left knee then pull it towards your body.

    Ceaze would you argue that stretching to increase flexibility wont prevent soreness?

    I've found that I can't go atg without straining myself because I lack the hip flexibility. The only way I see myself getting down there without hurting myself is stretching it on my off days, correct?
     
  4. Ricey McRicerton

    Ricey McRicerton New Member

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    I'm still kind of a noob to lifting and have just always felt better after I stretched. I think a lot of it is because I'm working muscles that aren't used to being worked like this they get extremely tight.
     
  5. timberwolf

    timberwolf New Member

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  6. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Improving flexibilty won't prevent soreness. That has more to do with the repeated bout effect.

    You should do dynamic hip mobility drills.
     
  7. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Soreness after a workout isn't due to "muscle tension."


    And for good measure:

    Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1999 Aug;9(4):219-25.

    The effects of preexercise stretching on muscular soreness, tenderness and force loss following heavy eccentric exercise.

    Johansson PH, Lindstrom L, Sundelin G, Lindstrom B.

    Department of Community Medicine, Umea University, Sweden.

    The present study sought to investigate the effects of preexercise stretching on delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), i.e. soreness, tenderness and loss of muscle force, that usually occurs after strenuous or unaccustomed eccentric exercise. Ten female volunteers performed 10 sets of 10 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions for knee flexion with both legs after a 5-min ergometer cycling warm-up. Prior to the exercise for one leg, randomly chosen, 4 x 20 s of static stretching for the hamstring muscle group was implemented. Rated soreness, tenderness on algometer pressure and loss of maximal eccentric contractile force was evaluated preexercise and 24, 48 and 96 h postexercise. The exercise bout produced severe DOMS, with parameters peaking and troughing at 48 h postexercise. However, no significant differences were found, regarding any of the parameters, when comparing stretched and nonstretched legs. The present study thus suggests that preexercise static stretching has no preventive effect on the muscular soreness, tenderness and force loss that follows heavy eccentric exercise.

    ------------------------------------------------------

    Scand J Med Sci Sports. 1998 Aug;8(4):216-21.


    The effect of passive stretching on delayed onset muscle soreness, and other detrimental effects following eccentric exercise.

    Lund H, Vestergaard-Poulsen P, Kanstrup IL, Sejrsen P.

    Dept. of Rheumatology, Copenhagen County Hospital Herlev, University of Copenhagen, Denmark.

    The aim of this study was to measure if passive stretching would influence delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), dynamic muscle strength, plasma creatine kinase concentration (CK) and the ratio of phosphocreatine to inorganic phosphate (PCr/P(i)) following eccentric exercise. Seven healthy untrained women, 28-46 years old, performed eccentric exercise with the right m. quadriceps in an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex, angle velocity: 60 degrees.s-1) until exhaustion, in two different experiments, with an interval of 13-23 months. In both experiments the PCr/P(i) ratio, dynamic muscle strength, CK and muscle pain were measured before the eccentric exercise (day 0) and the following 7 d. In the second experiment daily passive stretching (3 times of 30 s duration, with a pause of 30 s in between) of m. quadriceps was included in the protocol. The stretching was performed before and immediately after the eccentric exercise at day 0, and before measurements of the dependent variables daily for the following 7 d. The eccentric exercise alone led to significant decreases in PCr/P(i) ratio (P < 0.001) and muscle strength (P < 0.001), and an increase in CK concentration (P < 0.01). All subjects reported pain in the right m. quadriceps with a peak 48 h after exercise. There was no difference in the reported variables between experiments one and two. It is concluded that passive stretching did not have any significant influence on increased plasma-CK, muscle pain, muscle strength and the PCr/P(i) ratio, indicating that passive stretching after eccentric exercise cannot prevent secondary pathological alterations.

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    Res Q Exerc Sport. 1989 Dec;60(4):357-61.


    The effects of static stretching and warm-up on prevention of delayed-onset muscle soreness.

    High DM, Howley ET, Franks BD.

    University of Tennessee, Knoxville.

    It has been suggested in the lay literature that static stretching and/or warm-up will prevent the occurrence of Delayed-Onset Muscle Soreness (DOMS). The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effects of static stretching and/or warm-up on the level of pain associated with DOMS. Sixty-two healthy male and female volunteers were randomly assigned to four groups: (a) subjects who statically stretched the quadriceps muscle group before a step, (b) subjects who only performed a stepping warm-up, (c) subjects who both stretched and performed a stepping warm-up prior to a step test, and (d) subjects who only performed a step test. The step test (Asmussen, 1956) required subjects to do concentric work with their right leg and eccentric work with their left leg to voluntary exhaustion. Subjects rated their muscle soreness on a ratio scale from zero to six at 24-hour intervals for 5 days following the step test. A 4x2x2 ANOVA with repeated measures on legs and Duncan's New Multiple Range post-hoc test found no difference in peak muscle soreness among the groups doing the step test or for gender (p greater than .05). There was the expected significant difference in peak muscle soreness between eccentrically and concentrically worked legs, with the eccentrically worked leg experiencing greater muscle soreness. We concluded that static stretching and/or warm-up does not prevent DOMS resulting from exhaustive exercise.
     
  8. DerekForeal

    DerekForeal Diamond Member

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    For glute stretching i like to do very deep lunges with no weight and hold it. You should feel a nice stretch.
     
  9. GOGZILLA

    GOGZILLA Double-Uranium Member

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