GUN Glock 35

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by jonstains, Sep 15, 2002.

  1. jonstains

    jonstains Member

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    I know absolutely nothing about guns. I went to a gun shop last week and the saleman suggested that I get a gun that best fits my hand. The Glock 35 with rubber grip was the best fit out of probably 15 other guns. I was just wondering what your opinions on this gun are. Is it ok for a beginner that just wants to use it for protection and maybe twice a month range shooting? Also, how much would you pay for this gun ?
     
  2. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    The "Practical/Tactical" Glocks, models 34 and 35 (9mm and .40SW respectively) have extended slides, levers, lighter triggers and such semi-custom accessories. For just plinking around in a noncompetitive use, i find it all nice but unnecessary and for concealed carry, the gun is far too big. It'd be fine for a bedside gun. If you don't plan on trying to conceal it, no reason not to get it if you like it.

    A G35 should be going for $550-575 brand new.

    The rubber grip wasn't something that Glock ships with, it was probably a Hogue Hand-all or similar manufacture slip on grip. You can buy these for about $10 and put them on nearly any gun.

    A the "standard" version of the G35 is the G22. Same caliber, same grip size. The G23 would be a better bet still for concealment, but in that, you compromise some length (but not width) in the grip. The G22/G23 will be going for around $475-500 new.

    If you've never shot before, i'd recommend trying to borrow or rent some pistols in both 9mm and .40SW before buying. The .40 is very popular with police and target shooters, but many new shooters find the .40SW recoil to be too "snappy" and until you get used to it, it can inhibit your learning.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2002
  3. Argyle

    Argyle Guest

    as always, kellyclan covers everything :mad: :o
     
  4. jonstains

    jonstains Member

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    Thanks for the info kellyclan. I still have a few more questions though. Can you explain what "standard" means and what "practical/tactical" means? If they both have the grip size, then I would guess that the "standard" would fit me better for what I intend to use the gun for.
     
  5. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    Practical/Tactical is the sort of nickname Glock has given the G34/G35 models.

    "Practical" as in simple, practical modifications that make the gun especially ideal for competitions where extensive mods aren't allowed. "Tactical" for the same modifications being desired for tactical pistol use by police/military teams.

    When i say standard, i just mean the base models, it's not a term given by Glock like Prac/Tac.

    The differences are, in a nutshell:
    The G22 has a 4.5" barrel, G23 is 4", and the G35 is 5.3". The longer the barrel, the more accuracy you can squeeze out of it and the less recoil you're likely to notice. The difference will be marginal and it really wouldn't be worth concern for a while, until your skill is such that you will be able to shoot well enough to notice it.

    In turn, the slide length gets longer as the barrel does. A longer slide length means a longer "sight radius" (the distance between the front and rear sight). The longer the radius, the more accurate you can place the sights on a target, and at further range.

    You'll see the G35 has a section of its slide cut out on top. This is to reduce weight at the end of the gun, so as not to disturb the balance of the longer weapon in your hand. It also allows foreign debris to more easily get into the action of the weapon. Sometimes that will be less a concern than others, but it should always be a consideration.

    Trigger pull. The G35 trigger will break when about 4 lbs of pressure are exerted by your finger. (It's actually rated at 4.5lbs, but most seem to be lighter.) The G22 and G23 rate at 5.5lbs and seem to be close to that. A nice light trigger pull means your hand moves less while firing the gun, meaning the gun moves less, meaning you're more likely to hit your target. Again, this should be balanced against the possibility of you unintentionally pulling the trigger, the heavier the trigger, the less possible, as it takes more effort.

    The G35 also comes with an extended magazine release to make dropping the magazine easier and an extended slide lock lever to make releasing the slide easier when it is locked back, as it will do on an empty magazine. Once more, you can decide what is best for you. i don't find the extended magazine release necessary, so i haven't modified any of my Glocks with it. i do like the extended slide lock lever though, so i have modified most of my Glocks with that.

    As a disclaimer, my personal concerns are for reliability with reasonable accuracy, ease of concealability, and ease of handling. For my purposes, the smaller guns tend to work better, so if i sound like i'm knocking the G35, i'm not.

    Jump in any time Argyle! :big grin:
     

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