MIL Future of the Army

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Stigmata, Oct 31, 2005.

  1. Stigmata

    Stigmata New Member

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    Got this forwarded to me this morning, long read i know, but take the time, kinda informative

    U.S. Army Secretary: Transformation Difficult, but Moving Forward
    By Greg Grant
    DefenseNews
    October 21, 2005
    The U.S. Army is undergoing its most comprehensive transformation since 1939, a process made more difficult by the deployment of 285,000 troops overseas, including more than 100,000 in Iraq, said the service’s secretary. The Army’s vision is to remain the pre-eminent land-power on earth, Francis Harvey told a audience at the Heritage Foundation on Oct. 20, and achieving that aim means moving the service from a division-centric force to a brigade-centric organization.
    The primary combat unit of this new force will be the brigade combat team, which the Army is trying to standardize to ensure more units are available to be plugged into any forward-deployed higher headquarters. The Army is creating three types of brigades: infantry, heavy, and Stryker, of between 3,500 and 4,000 soldiers. They are collapsing three higher echelons of command, army, corps and division, into two smaller, and as yet unnamed command echelons. The Army’s plan is to ultimately have 77 active duty and reserve brigades in the rotational pool.
    Harvey said the Army continues to push the costly Future Combat Systems (FCS) program and said the service does not agree with a recent Congressional Budget Office report that pegged the costs of FCS at $164 billion through 2025. He said the Army’s official cost estimate is $27.7 billion for research and development, and $94 billion to stand up 15 FCS equipped brigade combat teams by 2025, for total program costs of $122 billion.
    The Army is adding 40,000 soldiers by 2007, at a total cost of $18 billion spread over six years. Up to 125,000 soldiers will be changing units and skills, moving from artillery to military intelligence for example, to take into account the increased primacy of irregular warfare.
    Harvey said the service is in the process of adopting new business practices known asLean Six Sigma, designed to cut costs, mainly by reducing the number of civilian and contracted personnel, through increased computerization and automation of manufacturing and administrative functions and other efficiency moves.
    Harvey: Army's Modernization Plan To Cost More Than $90 Billion By 2011
    By Jen DiMascio
    Inside The Army
    October 24, 2005
    Executing the Army’s strategic framework between now and fiscal year 2011 will cost the service more than $90 billion, the service secretary said last week. That figure includes the cost over the future years defense plan for changing to a modular brigade-based force, developing the Future Combat System, increasing the size of the operational force and resetting equipment damaged in Iraq and Afghanistan. The cost likely will increase following the end of those wars, when the service will need another two years -- and $4 billion per -- to reset all equipment.
    The service’s plan to increase the size of its operational Army will cost the service an additional $18 billion over the FYDP, the service secretary said last week. The service wants to increase by 40,000 the number of boots on the ground without increasing the overall end strength, said Army Secretary Francis Harvey during an Oct. 20 speech at the Heritage Foundation.
    The increase will ramp up the size of the “operational Army” from 315,000 to 355,000 by fiscal year 2007, a plan likely to emerge from the Quadrennial Defense Review process, Harvey said. “What I showed you, what the 40,000 will give us, is the ability to generate steady-state 20 brigade combat teams,” he said, adding that the figure is made up of 14 BCTs in the active force and six teams in the reserve force.
    That increase will be achieved through a combination of converting 29,000 military jobs to civilian positions as well as reducing the number of people in transit to training and the schoolhouse, Lt. Col. Thomas Collins, Harvey’s spokesman, told Inside the Army after the discussion. Currently the size of that “transient account” is 65,000, but the Army will offer soldiers options like remaining at home station to cut that number by 11,000, Collins said.
    The strategy “also gives us the ability to surge up to 35 to 40 brigades if the situation arises. Those are reasonably close to what is going to come out of the QDR. If an additional homeland security role or a leadership role in certain types of disasters comes about, we’ll put that into our models and figure it out,” Harvey said, during his speech.
    In addition, the plan calls for“125,000 changes in units and skills to be better aligned to the security environment,” according to a briefing slide Harvey presented at the discussion. He did not describe the changes in detail but said they would include moves such as standing down artillery units.
    The Army also plans to make brigade combat teams into “life-cycle units,” in which a soldier can count on remaining in a unit for three years in the active force or six years in the reserve force, Harvey said. Force changes will be executed alongside the service’s “Future Combat Force Strategy” that includes fielding the Future Combat System and moving from a division-based force to a modular brigade-based one.
    During the FYDP, themodular force will cost $48 billion, and FCS is projected to cost $25 billion, according to Harvey’s presentation. This strategy includes plans to modernize the current force by spiraling FCS technologies into Abrams tanks, Bradley Fighting Vehicles and M113 Armored Personnel Carriers during the next five years, Harvey said.
    The Army’s plans for modernization and transformation will require a change in how the service trains its leaders; accordingly, the service has established a task force to determine the way ahead. The service is calling its future leaders “pentathletes” to signify the need for them to be equally adept at a number of skills.
    Not only will those leaders have to be strategic and creative team builders, they must be capable of leading and changing large organizations, be skilled in governance and diplomacy and be dedicated “life-long learners,” Harvey said. He added that the Army does not expect to make major changes in the way it trains its military leaders; rather, the service will make only “minor adjustments in terms of education, training and assignments.”
    On the other hand, the civilian side of the military will need more work. “We have not done as good a job as we could do in growing our civilian leaders, so I would expect major changes in that area,” he said. As part of the strategic framework, the Army also is embarking on business transformation, a topic Harvey has visited many times since taking over as the service secretary.
    “What we’re fundamentally trying to do is free up resources for our warfighting mission,” he said. That includes five major initiatives, including establishing a “performance culture”; applying the “ Lean Six Sigma” model to its reset, repair, manufacturing and administrative processes; outsourcing when it makes sense; relying on information technology; and empowering leaders to make decisions and then holding them accountable.
    He elaborated on the establishment of a “performance culture,” which would link performance to rewards -- a system he drew on while managing companies in the private sector. That includes allowing bonuses of up to 30 percent of the base salary for outstanding senior executive service officials. Another program, the Presidential Rank Awards, will allow bonuses of up to 35 percent, he said.
    Harvey also will lead efforts to reduce the Army’s 1.5 billion-strong staff. That figure includes active andreserve soldiers, civilians and contractors. Eschewing layoffs, the Army will cut extraneous personnel by considering the need to replace some of those who retire or resign and “looking hard” at the 280,000 contractors employed by the Army, Harvey said.
    During his discussion, Harvey disputed a Congressional Budget Office projection that predicts FCS will cost the service $164 billion between 2006 and 2024. According to Harvey, development of FCS will cost $27 billion, and procurement through 2025 will cost $84 billion. “In round numbers, it’s $122 billion. That is our cost estimate based on our program numbers, and we’re sticking to it,” he said

     
  2. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    army units go like so:

    squad - 4 or 5 soliders
    platoon - 20 to 25 soldiers
    company - 4 to 5 platoons
    battalion - 4 to 5 companies
    brigade - multiple battailions
    division - base size force
    corps - muliti division unit


    This is close but may not be as accurate as possible. I have been gone for awhile.
     
  3. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    I think what the army wants to do is be able to deploy brigade type levels on their own instead of division type elements. Actually it is no different that the way the Army currently deploys. When 25th Infantry Division deploys it does not deploy as a division it deploys normally 1 brigade may be 2 depending on mission.

    Also I thought a flight was beneath a squadron.
     
  4. Ranger-AO

    Ranger-AO I'm here for the Taliban party. Moderator

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    I'll read it later. Just got off work and I'm too tuckered to read anything more detailed than EYOB-level cliffs. :hsugh:
     
  5. TRN

    TRN Well-Known Member

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    An Army of None.
     
  6. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    Looking for a few good men, huh :mamoru:
     
  7. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    squad/section - 8 to 15 soldiers
    platoon - 40 to 50 soldiers
    company - 3 to 4 platoons
    battalion - 3 to 4 companies
    brigade - multiple battailions
    division - base size force
    corps - muliti division unit


    How is translates to the Air Force is as follows.

    Squad = Section
    platoon = Flight
    Company = Squadron
    Battalion = Group

    After Group level is really doesn't translate over.
     
  8. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    that's a big ass platoon you got there. What type of units were you with?
     
  9. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    Communications units. Majority of platoons outside of Combat Arms are 40+ in size. In my 9 years in the Army I was never in a platoon smaller than 40 people.

    Here is a more accurate breakdown.

    Squad - 9 to 10 soldiers. Typically commanded by a sergeant or staff sergeant, a squad or section is the smallest element in the Army structure, and its size is dependent on its function.

    Platoon - 16 to 44 soldiers. A platoon is led by a lieutenant with an NCO as second in command, and consists of two to four squads or sections.

    Company - 62 to 190 soldiers. Three to five platoons form a company, which is commanded by a captain with a first sergeant as the commander's principle NCO assistant. An artillery unit of equivalent size is called a battery, and a comparable armored or air cavalry unit is called a troop.

    Battalion - 300 to 1,000 soldiers. Four to six companies make up a battalion, which is normally commanded by a lieutenant colonel with a command sergeant major as principle NCO assistant. A battalion is capable of independent operations of limited duration and scope. An armored or air cavalry unit of equivalent size is called a squadron.

    Brigade - 3,000 to 5,000 solders. A brigade headquarters commands the tactical operation of two to five organic or attached combat battalions. Normally commanded by a colonel with a command sergeant major as senior NCO, brigades are employed on independent or semi-independent operations. Armored cavalry, ranger and special forces units this size are categorized as regiments or groups.

    Division - 10,000 to 15,000 soldiers. Usually consisting of three brigade-sized elements and commanded by a major general, divisions are numbered and assigned missions based on their structures. The division performs major tactical operations for the corps and can conduct sustained battles and engagements.
     
  10. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    When I was Mech infantry our platoon was about 30 soliders
    and when I was Sat comm our platoon was about 35 so yeah your numbers are closer than mine. What type of signal where you?
     
  11. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    What is being micromanaged in your opinion?
     
  12. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    31F, MSE Network Switching Systems.
     
  13. smokie700

    smokie700 right near da beach, Boiiiii

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    I should have reclassed to that but i opted for the satcomm 31S because of the 9 months training. Have you heard that the pretty much teh entire 31 series got changed to 25 series?
     
  14. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    Yeah, but I am in the Air Force now.
     
  15. brackac

    brackac Fuck all of this. OT Supporter

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    They allow very few prior-service per year, and the majority have a skill that transfers over.
     
  16. Accord

    Accord New Member

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    :rofl:
     
  17. Gaunt

    Gaunt blood for the blood god OT Supporter

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    when general schonmaker came to FSU he talked about creating some of this stuff
     

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