Funky monitor cable?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by deusexaethera, May 4, 2006.

  1. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    I've recently acquired an older HP monitor -- looks to be about 21" -- and it has two connectors. One is obviously VGA, and the other appeared to be DVI but I later realized it's something different called EVC, which seems to be DVI and VGA rolled into one. I've never seen this before, and I've never seen a video card with an EVC plug on it.

    Does anybody have experience with EVC hardware (also called M1 or P&D)? IF I buy an EVC-to-DVI cable from Cables To Go or a similar outfit, will it successfully translate the DVI signal from my video card into the EVC signal that this monitor is expecting? I'm using a VGA cable for the time being, but on such a large screen it's making the picture a mite fuzzy and I want to replace it ASAP.
     
  2. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    M1 was created for projectors, I believe. It was one connector (looks like DVI but is longer) that can carry digital, analog, and USB connections.

    And to answer your question, yes they have M1 to DVI cables... However, check with your HP monitor that it supports DIGITAL through the M1 interface. Although it has the M1 connector, some devices would be listed as either "A" or "A/D". If it's "A" then it's analog-only. If it's "A/D" then it supports either standard.
     
  3. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Yeah, that's what I read too. I knew M1-to-DVI cables existed (I'm looking at one right now), I wanted to know whether the cables were designed to convert from DVI to M1. From what you say, the cables can convert from DVI to M1, but the presence of an M1 socket is no guarantee that the monitor can actually use a digital signal. What a load of crap; why would they make an all-in-one plug and not require that all devices with the plug are capable of handling all the possible signals the plug can recieve? Ah well, at least I found the PDF of the manual. Figures -- it was listed as a Compaq monitor, which is why I couldn't find it before.
     
  4. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    There is no "conversion" as you say... It's simply a different pinout. There are analog pins, and digital pins. Just because a device uses the M1 connector doesn't require it to support all of the features. M1 is to DVI exactly like HDMI is to DVI... Same signal, different package.
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Okay, so M1 is literally a DVI and VGA cable combined into a single package. That still doesn't explain why it is justifiable for a device with an M1 socket to be incompatible with ANY of the signals that would be broadcast via an M1 cable, or at least to be unable to down-convert the signal to something it IS compatible with. Bitches and hoes.

    My question is answered, though: if the monitor can use a DVI signal, then the DVI-to-M1 cable will work. Thanks.
     

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