Forced Induction Ford Hotness - Ford's Turbocharged Falcon

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, May 26, 2004.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    The new Falcon gets three new sixes and two new V8s!

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    By Glenn Torrens
    10 September, 2002

    With three new DOHC sixes - including a stunning ball-bearing turbo variant - two new V8s and a new interior, the BA Falcon has the potential to claw back some of its Australian market share. We take a look at what's under the bonnets - there are some real surprises.

    The Sixes

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    The rumours of a year or so ago were wrong. The Aussie Falcon doesn't score a new 'world' Ford Mondeo or Jaguar V6 of sub-4.0 litre capacity - instead it retains the Australian-designed in-line six that is unique in the Ford corporate cupboard.

    The BA Falcon's new engine remains at 4 litres and uses an architecturally similar block, crank and intake manifold but the engines - at last! - embrace contemporary technology by adopting double overhead camshafts and four valves per cylinder. The block is also new (finally getting rid of its engine accessory shaft - basically a lobeless camshaft that is a legacy of this engine's pushrod and distributor heritage), weighs less and is stiffer. The oil pump is now driven from the crank. The bore, stroke and rod-length combo is as before.

    Twin cams, four valves and VVT are a big step forward for the Falcon, but the technology tweaks will be familiar to anyone who's kept an eye on engine development over the past decade. But what is a stunning surprise is the use of infinitely variable valve timing on both the intake and exhaust cams!

    The engine management system uses electronic controlled throttle (ECT) that is becoming industry standard for its symbiosis with features such as traction control, ABS and cruise. It also looks after idle speed control without the need for a dedicated idle speed bypass. A big plus is the ability to tune throttle response - this can make an especially big contribution to the response and driveability of a well-controlled turbo engine.

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    The cam timing variation is quite substantial - both can advance up to 10 degrees and retard as much as 50 degrees. Having both cams infinitely timed certainly isn't industry standard and we reckon it will allow for greater scope for power development in the future - both as Ford updates during the engine's life and in the aftermarket.

    Ford describes the cam control on its engine as new-generation, with the phasers used on the cams sourced from Aisan in Japan. They are of the vane type - not the previous AU's optional helical type - and are employed for rapid response to cope in what is known as tip-in and tip-out (response at light applications of the throttle). It isn't a simple on-off system that 'kicks-in' a locked amount of change at a certain RPM like the previous Ford system (although the effective dual-resonance intake manifold remains and is switched at 3200rpm). Oil pressure is the VVT's control mechanism (there's an upgraded oil pump downstairs) with decisions made by the ECU.

    With a need for new hardware to ride its double bump sticks, Ford selected the roller follower system (in fact the basic geometry of the whole intake system) from its Duratec engine. This was done for three reasons: it was the lowest friction system Ford could find and it offered outstanding durability and performance at high rpm. The fact it was already in Ford's parts supply catalogue is an obvious benefit, too. For Falcon, it was improved with the addition of a clip to hold the lash adjuster to the rocker.

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    Ford made the point that the variable valve timing technology is employed in the Falcon engine to pack out the torque curve of the engine and decrease fuel consumption, rather than increase maximum power. (Although of course maintaining a high torque output at high revs will give lots of power - see the first breakout The New Six Against the Rest?.) The four-valve breathing and more stable combustion event thanks to a central spark plug and the extended rev range, not the adoption of VVT, are the keys to the engine's extra 25kW (33.5HP). The cams are forged rather than cast-iron, are hollow for reduced mass and are driven by a single-row timing chain, rather than the previous duplex.

    Infinitely variably timed cams allow delayed overlap to offer what is called dynamic internal exhaust gas recirculation for fuel economy benefits and lower emissions. By delaying the exhaust cam's closing during cruise situations, there is some suck-back of exhaust gas during the intake stroke, reducing the volume of the intake charge required for less fuel consumption. Similarly, the 'tuning' of the intake cam to close the valves late reduces pumping losses that also impact on fuel economy.

    With a clean-sheet head design, Ford was able to engineer in a certain degree of swirl and tumble in the intake ports to give what it describes as a good level of turbulence for good driveability at lower engine speeds, something that is critical with its Falcon engine that will - in all seriousness - not very often see the high side of 3000rpm. Ford claims its intake flow characteristics compare with international standards and that a comparison with the 'best around' is very favourable.

    Ford worked hard to develop uniform coolant flow around the cylinder head without hot spots. A feature of the water jackets is they run under the exhaust ports and around the spark plugs - in this way, Ford claims, it has achieved very uniform metal temperatures, something that is especially important in the new high-output turbo version. Differential temperatures lead to varied expansion rates that can take its toll on - especially - head gaskets. With attention to block deck stiffness and the new head casting (it is 50 percent stiffer than the previous SOHC head), clamping strength is more uniform and reliable, so the head gasket is a now a steel shim component. Several new manufacturing/machining steps have been implemented to produce the engine in Ford's existing manufacturing facility in Geelong, Victoria.

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    Despite the use of double the number of camshafts and valves, the engine friction level is claimed to be no higher than the previous engine. Friction is a parasitic drag on engine; on a large capacity engine with ever-stricter emissions targets to meet, wasting fuel on friction is not particularly desirable. Ford claims the contribution of the engine - rather than the management system driving it, we guess - to economy for the city drive cycle is in the order of a 3.5 percent improvement. The engine meets Euro II emission standards.

    Engine management is appropriately upgraded to control camshaft timing, electronic throttle control and fire the coil-on-plug ignition system. The engines use knock sensing, now activated across the entire engine rev range.

    Thanks to the popularity of Liquefied Petroleum gas (LPG) in Australia (and some niche export markets) there's a dedicated LPG variant of the engine. It has different pistons and valve seats and runs an LPG-friendly 10.7:1 compression for 156kW (209HP) at 4750rpm and 372Nm (274TQ) at 3000rpm. The LPG variant, although controlled electronically, does not adopt gaseous multipoint injection - delivery remains via the throttle body with a fumigated intake manifold.

    The Turbo!

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    The XR6 - until the XR8 arrives next year and maybe even then - is the stormer of the range. Turbocharged with a Garret ball-bearing GT40 and using a front-mount intercooler fitted off-line by Ford's special vehicles operations Tickford, it punches out 240kW (326HP) at 5250rpm and a very strong 450Nm (332TQ) is held flat and fat between 2000 and 4500rpm. That should endow it with more than simply class-leading acceleration - with its capacity and turbo, it's really in a class of its own - and it should now compare favourably with plenty of performance playthings from around the planet! (See the second breakout The XR6 Turbo Engine - Now and Beyond...)

    The wastegate is electronically controlled - most turbo cars are these days - and the system delivers 0.4bar (6psi) boost. The compression ratio has been dropped from 9.7:1 to 8.7:1via the fitment of new pistons, and exhaust valves more tolerant of higher temps are used. The turbo engine's VVT is mapped uniquely to the naturally-aspirated sixes for highlighted output in conjunction with the turbo.

    Happiest on Premium unleaded petrol (95RON or more), the XR6 engine is capable of drinking standard unleaded; however, the claimed power output is obtained on the good stuff. If the pricing is keen, and the marketing is right, we can see plenty of opportunity for conquest sales from other brands as well as to the Falcon faithful.

    We're yet to find out gear ratios, but the previous cars ran 3.23s in base-spec and 3.45 in performance spec. With more torque thanks to the VVT and tighter emissions specs just around the corner, we'd hazard a guess and say taller 3.23s will be fitted across the range. Either way, with relatively tall gearing to load up the turbo and bulk boosted torque, the XR6 should be one relaxed highway flier with massive acceleration just an ankle-flex away.

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    The XR6 Turbo Engine - Now and Beyond...

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    First and foremost, the new Ford Falcon XR6 stands as the most powerful turbo sedan ever marketed in Australia. Read that again - the most powerful turbo sedan ever marketed in Australia!

    In addition, thanks largely to its 4-litre swept capacity, double variable valve timing and ball-bearing turbo, it's also likely to be one of the most driveable turbocars ever pedalled on our shores; from just 2000 rpm (3250 below maximum power rpm!) this monster will give you 100 percent of its available torque. And you can rest assured there'll be spritely response on offer, even from idle rpm...

    In essence, the newly developed XR6 engine is likely to have the sort of drivability associated with 'low blow' turbo installations (such as the low boost 110kW (150HP) Audi A3/A4 engine), except it rewrites the rulebook by providing an impressive top-end as well.

    As a guide, most OE turbo installations result in about 30 percent more power than the naturally aspirated base engine - the ol' Holden VL Turbo, for example, picked up 33 percent. Ford's new XR6 engine meets this rough theory by offering 32 percent more peak power over the non-turbo variant - this in conjunction with a 21 percent peak torque hike. While these percentage gains appear pretty run-of-the-mill, the new turbo motor stomps out some very impressive absolute figures; if you thought the previous VCT XR6 engine was 'tough' with its 172kW (233HP) and 374Nm (276TQ), then the new turbo model's 240kW (326HP) and 450Nm (332TQ) must be from outer space!

    But how does this new donk compare to other hi-po engines on the market?

    Well, there's no question it makes the 180kW(244HP)/380Nm(280TQ) supercharged HSV XU-6 look like a children's playtime exercise and, perhaps more pressing, it should gladly wipe the floor with a base-spec Holden SS LS1 5.7-litre V8 (with only 225kW (305HP) at 5000 rpm, but a slightly healthier 460Nm (340TQ) at 4400 rpm).

    The thrust of it - if you want a full size Aussie sedan that's quicker than the new XR6, you'll likely need a 255-plus kilowatt LS1-powered HSV - not to mention 60 or more grand in loose change... (And even then, the Falc might still be in it - that peak torque spread is fantastic!)

    From an aftermarket perspective, however, there's nothing to say the Ford turbo engine has to remain with 'just' its factory 240 kilowatts (326 horsepower) and 6 psi boost - f-a-r from it.

    We guess that by improving the air intake and exhaust flow (the traditional place to start for cost-effective mods to turbocharged engines) you should see a power improvement of approximately 15 percent. In kilowatts, we're then talking a total of 276 (375HP)! The next step would be to upgrade intercooling - there should be plenty of room - and wind up the boost. With that turbo, 300kW (407HP) should be dead-easy...

    The only hurdle that might crop up is in relation to the Ford's engine management - the new system might incorporate stubborn fail-safes that detect mechanical changes and attempt to adjust timing/fuel/boost pressure to limit the potential power gains. In any case, a custom programmed chip will no doubt eventually spring onto the aftermarket alleviating the problem - and that always-working knock sensor will provide a safety buffer for tuners anyway.

    Aftermarket tinkerers will also have to conquer and tap into the advantages of the motor's standard electronic throttle control and variable valve timing. But as we already know from the Mazda MX5 SP's locally developed turbo ECU, variable valve timing and turbo boost go together like torque and tyre smoke...

    The potential for 'extreme tuning' the new Ford motor looks to be huge. The legendary VL Turbo has proven all that's needed for stupendous power - aside from a good, rigid engine design - is a fair number of cubes, a monster turbocharger and appropriate intercooling and fuel injection. The new Ford engine appears to be built plenty strong enough outa the factory, so all that'll hold its power output back is our imagination.

    Let the homegrown power games begin!

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    A brilliant full-size performance package at a bargain price

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    Published: 19 November, 2002

    Awesome, simply awesome. Ford has held nothing back with the release of its new Ford Falcon XR6 Turbo and the result is good enough for it to become the next cult car. Consider the XR6T 'big picture' for a moment; here's a freshly styled full size sedan with a modern tech turbocharged engine capable of 240kW (321HP) and enough low-to-mid range torque to make a big 5.7-litre V8 cry.

    And - to really stir a commotion - the 5-speed manual XR6 Turbo kicks off at only $43,965 ($31,110.65US)!


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    The new turbo engine is fantastic; it offers good throttle response (at least as good as any other turbo car on the market) and it's supremely flexible at all revs. No need to row gears in the XR turbo because with a 450Nm (332TQ) torque plateau available between 2000 - 4500 rpm she'll pull away instantly. Oddly, though, the engine is dead easy to stall when gently driving away from a standing start - you need a few revs onboard before you release the clutch pedal. Reaching to the other end of the rev range, the big six feels strong to just over 5000 rpm and there's only minimal vibration through to the rev limiter. Note that the rev limiter varies from about 5800 and 6200 rpm depending on conditions and, therefore, there's no redline marked on the tacho.

    Certainly, the 4.0-litre turbo (dubbed 240T) is an engine worth getting excited over. Ford has treated their long-standing 4.0-litre design to a 24-valve twin-cam head with variable inlet and exhaust cam timing (VCT), roller bearing GT40 Garrett turbocharger, Garrett front-mount air-to-air intercooler, Bosch blow-off valve and electronic throttle control. It is truly a quantum leap over anything in the previous Falcon range. For maximum drivability there's a relatively high 8.7:1 static compression ratio combined with very mild boost pressure. With the turbo set to deliver just 6 psi, the new engine can stomp out 240kW (321HP) at 5250 rpm and a very handy 450Nm (332TQ) from 2000 through to 4500 rpm. Who said all turbo engines are peaky?!

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    Unfortunately, the rest of the XR6T driveline feels like it's from a previous era of muscle cars...

    The standard BTR T5 5-speed manual gearbox whines and growls while, out back, the diff clunks and snatches as you get on and off the power. With barely 4,000 kilometres on the clock of our test car we can't help wonder how tired it'll feel at, say, 40,000 kays. Lucky there's a 3-year/100,000-kilometre warranty... The clutch pedal is slightly heavier than your average car but, considering the torque it has to live with, that's perfectly excusable. Note that an automatic sequential sports shift version of the XR6T is also available.

    You can't help admire how effortlessly the XR6 Turbo 5-speed can outrun the fabled Impreza WRX and run alongside a 5.7-litre Commodore. Giving it just a gentle launch with two people onboard we hand-timed a 0 - 100 km/h (62MPH) sprint in 6.6-seconds. With a bit of practice, though, we reckon the XR could crack 6-seconds flat - seriously cookin'.

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    As you'd expect, hauling around the 1732-kilogram (3,818 pounds) kerb mass at such pace does drain the 68-litre fuel tank pretty rapidly. However, averaged over typical city/urban driving, we returned a consumption figure of about 15-litres per 100 kilometres (with optimal performance coming from premium unleaded fuel). Note that the turbo Falc will allow you to reach quite decent economy figures if you drive it gently - there isn't the constant frictional losses associated with a big cube V8.

    The new Control Blade independent rear suspension - despite the controversy surrounding it - performs remarkably well. The turbo 4.0-litre gets its goods to the bitumen very effectively (unless provoked into doing something antisocial) and the rear feels well tied down through corners. Initial turn-in response is good, typically followed by slight understeer and - a little further through - the chassis will happily accept early application of the afterburner. Mid-corner throttle modulation shows excellent front-to-rear handling balance, while the standard Dunlop SP Sport 3000 235/45 17s inspire with a high level of grip.

    The standard diff on the XR6T is a ratchet-style limited slip unit with the added effectiveness of electronic traction control. The traction system performs very well in the majority of instances but it is still possible to degenerate into bulk wheelspin; it's not the sort of traction control that makes this a car you could safely let anyone drive in any condition.

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    Not surprisingly, the suspension settings are firmer than you'll find in the cooking model Falcons but, overall, the ride is exceptional; there's absolutely no uncomfortable harshness over any normal road surfaces. A top job by the Ford engineers.

    The XR6T's power rack and pinion steering arrangement is nicely weighted and doesn't tramline, but - like many cars in this class - there is some on-centre vagueness. The standard ABS brakes on the XR6T also do a fine job overall, though - given the low base price - we'd highly recommend buyers hand over an extra $2950 ($2,796.58US) for the premium brake upgrade. This will improve safety, retained value and - of course - provides something else to stand back and perve at. The giant anchors would also be better suited to towing large loads; Ford say the XR6T manual is good for lugging up to 1200 kilograms (2,646 pounds), while the auto version is rated anywhere up to 1600 kilograms (3,527 pounds).

    And now onto the XR6 Turbo's body and interior...

    Ford has made monumental improvements with the appeal of the new Falcon range. The BA is distinguished by its quad front headlights (which also happen to perform very well) and classy rear-end, while the Turbo model catches the eye with a tasteful body kit, driving lights, a chrome oval exhaust tip and 17 x 8 alloys. The lightening straight-line performance is given away by TURBO lettering on the bootlid and the intercooler nestled in the front air dam. Oh, and you'll be pleased to hear the XR6 body kit causes no ground clearance issues - not like one other local six-cylinder winged warrior recently tested...

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    Onboard, the XR turbo offers abundant space, excellent comfort and plenty of features. Like all BAs, there's plenty of headroom above the cranium of a 190cm tall front occupant and - with the seat slid back - there's so much legroom it's almost impossible for your feet to touch the firewall... In the rear there's also plenty of headroom for people up to about 190cm, plus generous shoulder, knee and foot space. The XR6's sports seating is comfortable and supportive and the driving position is very good, though some drivers said they didn't like the small, fat feeling of the leather steering wheel.

    The new Ford really has a leg over the opposition with its brilliant central LCD panel, which displays air conditioning/ventilation status, time and audio settings. Sun glare is avoided in 99 percent of situations. The main controls are well laid out and easy to use, the only exception is the buttons for the traction control, driving lights, boot and fuel flap release buttons are obscured.

    Standard equipment extends to twin front airbags, air conditioning (no climate control), remote central locking, cruise control, power windows, mirrors and driver's seat, aluminium Momo gearknob (plus the aforementioned leather wrapped steering wheel), adjustable front seat lumbar support, 4-way electric driver's seat adjustment, adjustable seatbelt anchorages with seatbelt pre-tensioners and a trip computer. An all-new CD/tuner sound system features digital sound processing (DSP) and has good clarity and punch up to high listening levels.

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    The instrument binnacle houses a 260 km/h (161MPH) speedo, redline-less tacho, fuel and temp gauges and an LCD trip computer. Blue LED nighttime illumination and a backlit XR logo make the instrument cluster look trick, but the 'Seiko style' gauge surrounds clutter the viewing area.

    Overall build quality is noticeably better than we've seen on earlier Falcons. Paint quality is very good, panel margins are decent and - at last - a trim piece has been added to finish the fuel filler surround. It seems Ford has been reading our criticisms of previous cars... Things are still short of being perfect, however. Our test car was missing a section of its external roof trim, the twin cup holders in the console feel a bit rough'n'ready, there's only base coat colour under the bonnet, we didn't like the rubber plumbing between the intercooler and throttle and the boot finish is substandard. Not only is the boot floor as undulating as a rocky road, the carpet edges aren't stitched and it scrunches up in a mess whenever a weighty object slides across it. The boot is partially redeemed by its abundant space (which is maximised with use of twin gas support struts), split fold-forward rear backrest and a full-size spare under the chipboard floor.

    Still - for just $43,965 ($31,126.23US) - you can't complain about a few gnarly bits. This is, unquestionably, the bargain performance buy of the last five years. Don't believe it? Well, the comparably priced Subaru WRX is smaller, lesser equipped, slower and, in many ways, lower-tech while the offerings from Holden don't stack up well against the Ford. Sure, the VY Commodore SV8 undercuts the XR6T by about $3500 ($2,477.92US), but it's so far behind in equipment and appeal it's not funny. The vehicle closest to the spec of the XR6T must be the new SS Commodore, but - at around $5500 ($3,893.90US) extra - it's nowhere near as good value. We'd much rather buy an XR6T, give it the premium brake package and a few options - maybe side airbags and a power sunroof - and come away with a few bucks change...

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    Why You Would...

    Technically advanced engine
    Extreme flexibility with peak torque stretching between 2000 - 4500 rpm
    Effortless 6-second 0 - 100 km/h performance
    Very roomy and practical
    Interior well appointed and attractive
    Attractive styling
    A whole lot of performance car for the money

    Why You Wouldn't...

    Gearbox and differential whines and clunks - we wonder about durability
    Sucks fuel fairly heavily when driving hard
    Poor finish inside the boot
    Despite standard traction control, the chassis could still 'get away' from an inexperienced driver

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    Comments from a Targa Tasmania Ace

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    Consistent Targa Tasmania front-runner and ex-GT-R racer, Craig Dean, had some interesting driving impressions of the XR6T.

    Craig admired the smoothness and progression of the engine, the steering direction, the chassis' ability to put the power down and the evenness of the drive - a feeling similar to having a Torsen-type diff. On the other hand, he thought the gear lever was positioned too far to the left, the gearshift was slow and the car plough understeered while cornering over a corrugated surface. He also added that an extra 1000 rpm of top-end torque would be nice; "something like in my twin-turbo race Supra"...
     
    Last edited: May 26, 2004
  2. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    If you still need convincing that Ford's XR6 Turbo is king, here it is!

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    25 May, 2004

    BA Falcon Turbo
    10.9 second quarter mile
    405kW (543HP) ATW
    12-injector manifold
    Standard turbo
    Tweaked auto trans
    Completely streetable car


    For many years the Australian high-performance scene has been dominated by the Subaru Impreza WRX. But if you ever needed proof that there is a new performance king on the scene, this is it!

    Let's take some time to think about the numbers associated with C&V Performance's Ford XR6 Turbo.

    First, it has made 385kW (516HP) at the back wheels. That equates to around 500kW (671HP) at the engine or, to put it another way, about 50 percent more power than the current 8.0-litre Dodge Viper... Muscle car? You must be talking 4.0-litres of turbocharged six!

    Second, with no other track preparation apart from a pair of rear slicks, the car has run a best quarter mile time of 10.9-seconds at 124.7 mph!
    It's so fast that the racing officials won't let it run again without a roll cage!

    Oh, and we'll fill you in on one other important little titbit... Since running this time, the car has been further tweaked to pump out an extra 20kW (27HP) at the wheels - bringing the total up to 405kW (543HP) ATW!

    Subaru WRX - what?!

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    We test the APS Phase II upgrade for Ford XR6 Turbos - and come away very impressed!

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    30 April, 2004

    If you own a Ford XR6 Turbo and want more grunt along with a sportier soundtrack, we’ve got a few words for you - APS Phase II. This aftermarket kit offers excellent value for money and the mods are so seamlessly integrated you’d think its 100 percent factory. If somebody told us we were driving a factory-enhanced version of the XR we’d believe it! APS’s R&D effort is simply huge - and it obviously pays dividends.

    So what is the Phase II kit? Well - logically - it’s a progression from the Phase I upgrade that (at the time of writing) relies solely on a UniChip. Phase II goes further with a free-flow exhaust and air intake, higher capacity injectors and fuel pump. Total cost for the Phase II kit (fitted and tuned) is $5650 ($4,000.24US) - impressive considering the huge performance increase.

    APS publicly claim the Phase II kit can increase power to over 280kW (375HP) at the wheels (in fourth gear of a 5-speed manual in Dyno Dynamics Shout-out Mode 6). This equates to around 330kW (442HP) at the flywheel.

    Let’s put it to the test!

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    A 330kW (443HP) load mover? No we're not talking about a medium size truck, but Croydon Racing Developments' APS-kitted XR6 Turbo ute!

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    2 December, 2003

    If you thought Ford Australia's heyday was back in the era of Phase III Falcon GTHOs, boy, are you living in a different world! So you reckon a true Aussie performance car should be able to swallow a family? Something with a bit of visual impact and definitely the ability to reel off 14-second quarters? Well, go down to your local Ford dealer today with about $45k ($31,828US) in your back pocket and you'll come away the very satisfied owner of a Falcon XR6 Turbo. Even in standard form, the XR6T cranks out 240kW (321HP) and can run in the 'supercar' 14s. Not hanging around by any standard.

    But what if that 14-second ET performance loses its eye-widening excitement after a few months of ownership? Well, this XR6 Turbo ute - owned by Sydney's Croydon Racing Developments - is a good example of the modification direction you can take.

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    We take a look at - and drive - the Whiteline handling upgrade for the Ford XR6 Turbo...

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    Words by Michael Knowling
    8 October, 2003

    With astounding straight-line performance, great accommodation and a high equipment level it's no wonder the Ford XR6 Turbo is hot property on the performance car market. We've already seen a couple of aftermarket workshops getting stuck into the DOHC 4.0-litre turbomotor extracting more kilowatts, but what's been happening in the area of chassis development, you ask?

    We recently visited Sydney's Whiteline Suspension to talk with Jim Gurieff regarding their yet-to-be-released XR6T handling upgrade and had a chance to drive the car they've been using for development - the car owned by AutoSpeed contributor, Andrew Pade.

    Andrew tells us: "The standard XR6 Turbo isn't too bad for a factory set-up. It's good for running through the supermarket carpark, but it can get a bit light in the rear through corners and it's a bit unsettling. There can also be a bit of understeer on entry to corners."

    But with the Whiteline upgrade? "It's much more stable - it gives me a lot more confidence and my cornering speeds are well up,"
    he says.

    After driving Andrew's Whiteline-equipped XR6T, we can only agree with his sentiments...

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    Relatively basic mods - totalling $3900 ($2,761.85US)
    - achieving a 20 percent power and 30 percent torque gain on an XR6T...


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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    9 September, 2003

    Here it is - already, our second story covering a power-up kit for Ford Australia's Falcon XR6 Turbo (which is still less than a year old!).

    In our last XR6T power-up story we looked at Nizpro's MoTeC management approach, which - for around $6000 ($4,249.01US) - gives up to 25 percent more power. This upgrade gives an obvious on-road performance improvement and behaves nicely, but - as Nizpro is all too aware - the MoTeC approach isn't a particularly cost-effective one if you never plan going whole-hog with an engine build.

    So here's a more affordable 'entry level' power-up kit for the Ford XR6 Turbo...

    Melbourne's AVO (Advanced Vehicle Operations) have been busy playing with their in-house development XR6T 5-speeder and have recently introduced a so-called Stage One upgrade, which retails for a modest $3900 ($2,761.72US)
    (fully fitted and tuned).

    What does that $3900 ($2,761.72US) get you? Well, you become the owner of a brand new Perfect Power SMT6 interceptor module, a set of six high-flow injectors, a fuel-cut defender module and a high-flow cat-back exhaust system.

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    Already we're seeing big power gains with the Ford XR6 Turbo!

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    12 July, 2003

    When the BA Ford XR6 Turbo was released to the Australian public it was inevitably going to be BIG in terms of aftermarket go-fast appeal. Just a few months after its debut in October 2002, we're already starting to see a few enhancement packages emerge on the market - the first we've had the opportunity to report on is from Melbourne's Nizpro garage.

    As you may remember from previous articles, Nizpro's Simon Gischus has - since now - specialised in only Nissan and Holden LS1 power-ups, but the potential of the XR6-T was simply too huge to ignore.

    "Having owned our development car - a 4-speed auto - for a few months I reckon it's a pretty good thing; it steers well and, although it's not a racecar, it has good performance out of the box," Simon says.

    Needless to say, though, the factory serving is not enough to really set an enthusiast's pants on fire...

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    Un-bloody-believable is the only way to describe the soon to be released APS Phase 3 kit for the Ford XR6 Turbo...

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    Words by Michael Knowling, Pix by Julian Edgar
    22 December, 2003

    We're tootling along at 100 km/h (62MPH) on the freeway behind the wheel of an APS Phase 3 kitted XR6 Turbo. After a cursory check for police, we nail the throttle to the floor. Whoo-ah! The big Ford's nose lifts heavenwards and the speedo needle swings to 200 km/h (124MPH) in a blink. S-h-i-i-t! This bugger defies all laws of physics - cars aren't supposed to accelerate like that!

    We do it again to confirm that what we were experiencing was real. Once again, the tweaked XR reels back on its suspension and accelerates at a rate that no other streeter could possibly hope to match. This is simply awesome stuff. And as if the sheer speed isn't enough, all this comes with absolutely factory-like starting, idle, smoothness and drivability...

    To say we're blown away is an understatement; the APS Phase 3 kit sets new benchmarks for modified cars. We kid you not.

    So what is this Phase 3 kit, you ask?

    Well, at the time of writing, the Phase 3 kit is yet to be released and its state of tune (ie boost, ignition timing, etc) is yet to be finalised. This story is essentially a prototype preview.

    On the other hand, the hardware of the Phase 3 kit has been given the final go-ahead. The kit comprises a replacement exhaust, high-flow cold air intake, front-mount intercooler, high capacity injectors and fuel pump, along with a UniChip.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  3. DMClark

    DMClark Active Member

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    Over here damnit!
     
  4. PoP N Fresh

    PoP N Fresh 0_0!

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    that BA falcon turbo needs to get the fuck on over to the USA
     
  5. bal

    bal New Member

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    i wonder how much you can do with just a boost controller on the xr6-t :naughty:
     
  6. threeclaws

    threeclaws R.I.P.

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    :cool: but unless I move to AUS it doesn't mean much to me :hs:
     
  7. <Mark>

    <Mark> A flute without holes, is not a flute. A donut wit

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    I want one of those.
     
  8. Scoob_13

    Scoob_13 Anything is possible, but the odds are astronomica

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    Tempting, and until I read the acceleration time I was up for it.


    TRY MAKING A CAR THAT DOESN'T WEIGH 2 TONS. :uh:
     
  9. BLoG

    BLoG Scented Meat

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  10. 3g for break upgrades!!!
     
  11. dmora

    dmora Guest

    :bowdown:

    IB Blog rubs one out.
     
  12. dmora

    dmora Guest

    :mamoru:
     
  13. BLoG

    BLoG Scented Meat

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    oh hey ts, this one is for you

    [​IMG]
     
  14. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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  15. Blindsight

    Blindsight Guest

    i want that engine in a lightweight car... STAT
     
  16. Carl Brutananadilewski

    Carl Brutananadilewski Active Member

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  17. Possum Stomper

    Possum Stomper The Great Bird of the Galaxy

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  18. HAHA We make cool cars that we refuse to fucking produce in our own damn country!!1 :mad:
     
  19. AJC13B

    AJC13B Whats a nubian?

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    :wavey:

    Are the pages of the brochures all stuck together TriShield? :rofl:
     
  20. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    Not yet. :o
     
  21. episime

    episime OT Supporter

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    The only decent ford sold in Australia for sure.
     
  22. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Even the V8 versions are cool. 5.4L - 394HP. :eek3:
     
  23. delslow

    delslow my car may not be fast, but the back window goes d

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    that first article is from almost 2 years ago :ugh:
     
  24. MrBonus

    MrBonus Et Tu, Brute?

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    ECT. :down:
    Infinite cam timing adjustments? :down:

    Sounds like a tuning nightmare.
     
  25. MR. Marti

    MR. Marti New Member

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    i must disagree. that kind of timing adjustments make tuning a dream come true. So many cars we work on could benefit from that kind of setup.

    car looks cool. like a boosted GTO really. i think that would sell quite well here. especially with the US's resparked love affair with the gift from the gods above-TURBOS
     

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