GUN ? for those that shoot corrosive ammo..

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by Matt2000ss, Mar 29, 2009.

  1. Matt2000ss

    Matt2000ss OT Supporter

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    How do you guys clean your guns after shooting corrosive? I hear Windex down the barrel immediately after firing and hot soapy water when ya get home.

    Is it that simple?
     
  2. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    I just use slip 2000 degreaser bore snake and thats it
     
  3. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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  4. Paul Revere

    Paul Revere OT Supporter

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    super hot soapy water
    windex
    warm water
    boresnake w/ CLP
     
  5. Keesh

    Keesh New Member

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    I skip the Windex part and just clean when I get home. If you're dead set on spraying your guns with something at the range I would recommend WD-40, it's cheap and will protect against moisture.
     
  6. Keesh

    Keesh New Member

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    imnotryan, the water has to be pretty hot. I have a couple old toothbrushes I put soap on and scrub the muzzle brakes on my 5.45 AKs. Like I said earlier, WD-40 works very well. I put a healthy coating of that on everything before I put it away. The next time I shoot it I get sludge seeping out of parts but that wipes off easily and I don't have any rust.
     
  7. Bacardi 151

    Bacardi 151 New Member

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    I flush it with boiling water.

    Spray it with windex.

    Flush it with boiling water again.

    Clean it as normal. I check the next few days for rust just incase and reoil anything that may have it.
     
  8. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    Windex doesn't do anything for you, it's the water in windex that helps you flush out the salt from your gun.

    I don't do anything at the range, I just clean at home. This is what I do:
    1. disassemble
    2. put gas tube, muzzle break, and the gun in a bucket.
    3. Pour boiling water down the barrel (gas tube and muzzle break is submerged in boiling water now)
    4. Take them out
    5. Dip just the face of the firing bolt in hot water
    6. Dip piston only in hot water (Don't dump entire bolt carrier in, not needed)
    7. Use hair dryer to dry out water that's still remaining (not much most have evaporated away by now)
    8. Clean as usual.
     
  9. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

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    I skipped cleaning once, before I got my routine down (I have it around 30minutes now) because it was taking long when I was first doing it. After about 3 hours I saw light surface rust on the inside of muzzle break.
     
  10. zumin3k

    zumin3k New Member

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    I just do what most of these guys do. Leave it until I get home, hot water, bit of windex, CLP and that's it.
     
  11. Cannondale

    Cannondale OT Supporter

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    I soak a few patches in Birchwood Casey Muzzle Magic and run them through the bore, neutralizing the corrosive salts. After runing a few dry patches through there, I then clean like I would any other barrel with foaming bore cleaner, a nylon brush and some patches.
     
  12. david_4x4

    david_4x4 New Member

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    I just fill up the bath tub with hot soapy water and toss them in.
     
  13. Iceburn

    Iceburn Made in the USA

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    Does it matter how much you shoot? I shot like 30 rounds of corrosive ammo in my mosin and never cleaned it. Whats the worst that could happen?
     
  14. Slick26

    Slick26 Gun|Bike|Cigar|PS3|Beer |Whisky|Night Crew

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    How much boiling water and Windex do you think the Russians had in WWII?











    Exactly.
     
  15. thegooch

    thegooch OT Supporter

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    Yup, although you need to wipe down everything that came into contact with the water with some CLP or Hoppes
     
  16. thegooch

    thegooch OT Supporter

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    Sure the guns might have survived, however I've seen many a Mosin and K98 with dark and pitted bores due to corrosive salts.

    When I got my 1st Mosin I just sprayed Windex on the bolt face and down the barrel. Within a day I had surface rust all over the bolt face. Ever since I've use HOT soapy water I have not have a problem.
     
  17. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    [​IMG]
     
  18. Slick26

    Slick26 Gun|Bike|Cigar|PS3|Beer |Whisky|Night Crew

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    :rofl: wtf "GET IN MAH BELLEH!"
     
  19. LancerV

    LancerV Something Happened OT Supporter

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    Owls are going to give me nightmares now
    [y]1eQuKcBgE-M&[/y]
     
  20. Matt2000ss

    Matt2000ss OT Supporter

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    holy shit, i'm closing my windows tonight! No satanic owls are get'n me!
     
  21. GarandBobcat

    GarandBobcat New Member

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    We used corrosive ammo in WW2, except in M1 Carbines; the US never produced a single round of corrosive .30 Carbine, at least not for the military.
    Reason being, the Powers-That-Be (PTB) figured the short-stroke floating piston design of the carbine, versus the integral long-stroke piston&oprod in the M1 Rifle, would be too hard for the average trooper to clean in the field, and corrosion in there would tie up the gun or possibly even destroy by pitting the gas cylinder or piston, thus reducing it to a single-shot weapon.

    .30 M2 ammo, all types, .45 ammo, and I bet even .50 ammo were all corrosive-primered.

    Of course, look at all the 1903s, M1917s (rifles and MGs), M1919s, M2s, M1 rifles, BARs, 1911s, etc, and tell me how many of them still have original barrels and bolts/slides on them.

    Of those, how many are still in good condition (or better)? I have a 1942-manufactured 1903A3, with what's probably an original barrel--the receiver is from March or so of '42, and the barrel is stamped either Jan or Feb or '42, and the barrel is in good shape.

    On the other hand, so's the rest of the gun, including the original stock.

    I bet it was never actually used much, if at all.

    And that's kind of my point: All those old guns that had loads of corrosive ammo fired through them under combat conditions have probably had new barrels and bolts installed, at least once in their lifespan.
    Or the bore is all kinds of dark from frosting and pitting. And possibly the boltface too.
    Sure, we used corrosive ammo in the Pacific. And that's where the M1s experience the highest rate of jamming, AFAIK, especially in the wetter areas--which is most of the theater. The moisture in the air caused barrels, bolts, pistons, and oprods to rust up to the point that sometimes guns would be stuck shut, or rusted into inoperability.
     

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