GUN Flinching vs calibre.

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by merlin, Oct 13, 2008.

  1. merlin

    merlin OT Supporter

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    Need some advice - I'm about to purchase my first centrefire rifle and I was all set on getting a Remy 700 in 308. Went down to the gun shop yesterday and the owner was trying to convice me to get the R700 in .223 instead as my first gun as he said if I buy a 308 I will develop a flinch that I will never get rid of due to the noise and recoil of the 308. He said to shoot the 223 for a couple of years then buy a 308 as well.

    What do you guys reckon? As far as experience goes I grew up on air rifles and have shot 22LR for a few years, so no centrefire yet but I have never flinched with a 22.

    But due to the prohibitive cost of rifles in Aus (the R700 set up will cost me $2K) I'd hate to have to buy two rifles if i get bored of the 223.
     
  2. Bad technique and lack of practice causes flinching, not .308 caliber weapons.
     
  3. Painkiller

    Painkiller Sometimes remembering is better than forgetting

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    first time shooters with .300 ultra mags don't help either. However I feel anybody can shoot any caliber with simple techniques.
     
  4. 7

    7 First comes smiles, then lies. Last is gunfire.

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    with proper hearing protection the muzzle blast shouldn't be an issue.
     
  5. PanzerAce

    PanzerAce Active Member

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    Plus, if you already shoot a .22LR, just shoot that for awhile to get rid of the flinch.
     
  6. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

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    Hearing protection goes a long way to reducing muzzle blast. A decent stock (read: not HS) does same for felt recoil.

    I wouldn't be concerned with developing a flinch shooting 308. If you find the recoil to be uncomfortable, consider adding weight the the rifle, and changing out the stock. If this is a gun that will strictly be shot with hearing protection, a good brake will make the gun move about as much as a 223. I personally hate brakes though on hunting rifles (waaay too loud).
     
  7. dpixel8

    dpixel8 New Member

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    you can use snap-caps to reduce/eliminate your flinch. it's all about practice
     
  8. kf4zht

    kf4zht New Member

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    That's bad info. Flinching depends on the shooter, not the caliber. I have seen people flinch with .22s and people who never flinch with 300 win mags. Flinches are cure able with practice. Better yet, find a flintlock, that 1 sec delay between trigger pull and shot will fix you of flinch.


    Guy probably has an overstock of .223 and is looking to get rid of them.
     
  9. dpixel8

    dpixel8 New Member

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    and if you dont want to use snap caps, get a revolver and put shells in only half
     
  10. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    many factors that contribute to flinching. The three major ones are how the gun is set up, experience, and noise. For example if you shoot one of those ultra light snub nose revolvers with full house magnum loads you can develop a flinch real easy. Due to the low mass of the revolver, stout recoil, and long heavy trigger it is easy to develop a flinch. I guess the same could be said for a 308 or any medium caliber or larger rifle if it is a light weight hunting model and shot primarily unsupported freehand. Mass and ergonomics definately can help.

    Second is the noise or report of the gun. If your shooting with just cheap ear plugs and from a covered shooting area or indoor range the report is going to be real loud. for many newer shooters this is one of the major causes of a finch. Get some good earplugs like the custom molded ones, and a good pair of ear muffs that you can shoot a rifle with. Double plugging really helps

    Lastly it's experience. If you have bad technique the gun is really going to be fighting you. If your scared of the gun whether you admit it or not it is going to be difficult to master. You can say anything you want, your concious mind cannot lie to your sub councious mind. And guess which one control flinching. Shooting a 22 does not really help by itself, nore does dry fire by itself. You have to identify and resolve the 3 main factors why you finch.
     
  11. Iceburn

    Iceburn Made in the USA

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    the first gun my friend ever shot was a 3" S&W 500. He doesn't flinch too much.
     
  12. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

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    really, how are his 25 yard groups. Is it even on paper.
     

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