First time assemblying custom PC

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by MeanGreen, Oct 17, 2006.

  1. MeanGreen

    MeanGreen New Member

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    I have assembled lots of dell desktops and servers at work but this is my first shot a building mine from the ground up. Was just wondering if you all had any pointers on what to do or any things to watch out for. I am sure it won't be all that hard but when i'm paying out of my pocket, i just want to make sure i'm doing everything right. Its easy to do at work since they dell's basicly just snap together in minutes and if i break it, its not coming out of my pocket lol.

    I'm really just concerned mostly about getting the cpu seated correctly, attaching the heatsink, and securing the board to the case.
     
  2. Repentinus

    Repentinus New Member

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    CPU's need a nudge only, not a push. Best advice I have.
     
  3. Nefarious77

    Nefarious77 Guest

    Don't ever tighten any screws and take your time.
     
  4. Deevan

    Deevan Active Member

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    Check your RAM tolerance.
     
  5. MeanGreen

    MeanGreen New Member

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    Tolerance? not quite following
     
  6. piratepenguin

    piratepenguin New Member

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  7. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    You prolly already know this but watch out for static...it can ruin components.

    Also, becareful not to bend the pins on any connections. CPUs have tons of little pins and you should be extra careful not to bend them. If you happen to bend one...bend it back very carefully. If you break it off, your CPU won't work properly.

    Also, there's really no need to force connections. If you have to force something to get it to work, you're prolly doing it wrong. Better to look for the reasons before you force it.
     
  8. Tvan

    Tvan New Member

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    Don't ever apply force that should seem unnecesary for components considering how fragile thay are. Even ram will slide right in when done properly.

    Oh, and be careful with the thermal paste. It gets everywhere if you're not careful.
     
  9. MeanGreen

    MeanGreen New Member

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    Thanks for the info everybody.

    For static, figured i would assemble it on my workbench. I would be standing on a think rubber mat on a concrete floor, and the wood workbench has a think rubber mat on it as well. Is it really necessary to have a ground strap? Also would wearing something like rubber glove keep the static down?

    Looks like i already knew the rest except for putting in the CPU. So it will basically just kind of sit in there and then i pull the locking lever back down correct? Then apply thermal paste to top of CPU and place heat sink/fan assembly on being careful not to be to forceful.

    Still didn't understand about the ram tolerance thing, not sure if it was a newb joke or if it was a concern. But just wanted to cover all bases before i got breaking stuff. :ugh:
     
  10. dorkultra

    dorkultra OT's resident crohns dude OT Supporter

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    a good tip i picked up for bending a bent pin back into place, is to use the hollow tube from a mechanical pencil or a hypodermic needle
     
  11. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    You absolutely do NOT have to have a wrist strap to ground yourself. You can simply touch some metal before ever handling your components. However, static is a subtle foe....In my digital electronics lab, we had wrist straps, anti static pads and both me and another guy managed to discharge onto our test boards. His fried, mine didn't...at least I didn't appear to have fried.

    We were just careless and weren't thinking. That's why a wrist guard is nice because you don't always have to think about static. How often do you just think about something and reach for it without worring about static. All the time right?? Well that's what got us into trouble, we just reached without thinking and discharged into our boards. heh oops.

    When you insert the CPU, open the lever first then the CPU should just slide down into place. You may have to apply a slight bit of pressure but not much. There should not be a gap between the top of the socket and the bottom of the CPU...then push down the locking lever to lock it into place.

    Before you put the CPU in, look at the pins and compare them to the socket. One corner will be missing some pins on the CPU and there should be a corresponding pattern on the socket. These are used to orient your CPU properly on the board.

    Yes then apply the thermal grease, but not too much because the heat sink will fasten down pretty snugly on top of the CPU and squish some of it out the sides....clean up the excess.

    I've had some trouble in the past getting the heat sink and fan to lock properly. In fact, on one motherboard, I had to use quite a bit of force to get it to lock down. However before applying that force, you should look for a problem first. Also think about they flexing of the board, you do NOT want to flex a motherboard too much because you could screw it up royally.

    Anyways, good luck.
     
  12. MeanGreen

    MeanGreen New Member

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    thanks for the info coottie,

    once last newb question though, mother board spacers. Just need to use them to elevate it away from the side of the case correct? Also i have seen boards come with paper washers of some tipe. i assum you put them on the top part of the board so that the head of the screw touches the washer and does not have direct contact with the board?
     
  13. Coottie

    Coottie BOOMER......SOONER OT Supporter

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    I've only used the spacers once when the ports wouldn't line up with the back panel of the case but with the spacers they lined up perfectly. Just do a test fit before you screw anything down.

    As far as the paper washers, you prolly won't see these anymore and it shouldn't be an issue. Most MBs have isolated screw holes so it's really not an issue.

    Also, when tightening everything down, don't try to put the death lock on the screws....that's a good way to strip them out. Just make sure they are snug + a little more but not too much more. :)
     

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