GUN First handgun dilemma

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by 90free400e, Oct 8, 2007.

  1. 90free400e

    90free400e New Member

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    So I'm turning 21 on the 16th, and I am trying to decide what to purchase.
    I'm planning on getting my concealed carry permit when I have time to take a class in my home state (North Carolina). I am trying to decide between a carry pistol or a .22 pistol (ruger or p22). I don't have the funds to purchase both. I shot alot of different handguns in a riflery class I took here at school, but I can't decide whether to go ahead and get a carry pistol or a .22 to practice with and get proficient with shooting and handling a handgun. When it comes to rifles everybody always says that a 10/22 (or variant of it) should be your first purchase. What is everyones opinion when it comes to handguns?

    As far as a carry pistol, I really want a 10mm. It would be expensive to shoot but it is by far my favorite round that I have shot so far. Would it be smarter to purchase a different caliber that is less expensive or go ahead and get the caliber that I want and just shoot as much as possible. I have shot a 1911 in 10mm and a glock 29 in 10mm. Are there any recomendations for other pistols in 10mm?
     
  2. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    What are you experiences and expectations of your handgun. And what kind of budget do you have, OUTSIDE of the initial gun purchase itself. Because you will have to take into consideration ammo, holster, training, etc.
     
  3. lt1aggie

    lt1aggie what?

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    i'd go ahead and buy whatever you are going to carry with and just practice with that.
     
  4. 90free400e

    90free400e New Member

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    As far as budget, I have about 600-700 dollars to play with.
    I have shot just about every common caliber (9mm,10mm,.40,.38,.357 etc)
    I am in school right now and just want to be as responsible as I can, meaning I want to make sure I can handle and shoot proficiently and safely before I start carrying. Im just trying to get an idea as to how yall think the best way of going about this is, whether its shooting alot with a .22 or shooting alot with a carry gun.
     
  5. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Here's my theory with Self Defense pistols, and choosing a caliber. I guarantee it's not universally accepted. But this is my experience with it as it relates to my experience with competitive shooting and CCW for the past 10 years.

    10 well placed shots with a 9mm, is better than 10 really loud missed shots with a 10mm. It's all about shot placement, and self defense round is only pertient, if it actually finds it's mark. Some may argue the "stopping power" factor, but what about the "human factor". Simply put, I'd recommend that the larger calibers are for a little more skilled shooter. Starting out with one, would be like giving a Ferrari to a 16yo that just got his license. I'm sure he could find his way around the block a few times, but it also opens him up to a lot of trouble and bad habits.

    With a smaller, more manageable and cheaper caliber, you can shoot more, therefore you are more proficient. You also have to take into consideration, this will NOT be your last firearm. You will have a good fundamentals to cross over to larger calibers at a later time, but still meet your needs in terms of a sufficient SD cartridge, as well as a relatively cheap gun to feed.

    The recommendation for .22 is fairly drastic. I would only recommend those to younger or female shoters. For younger males like yoruself who's not entirely new to guns, I'd recommend a 9mm.

    In that respect, i'd suggest going out to a range that will allow you to shoot various models. Most ranges allow you to rent many different guns of the same caliber. I say this because although a gun may "fit your hand" rite, it may not shoot rite.

    If you are absolutley set on a larger caliber. A .45 characteristics are a little more forgiving than a 10mm, it's also easier to find locally.

    In the price range you mentioned, The following are good recommendations:

    XD
    Glock
    M&P

    These are all good carry/range guns that are more forgiving towards newer shooters.

    Don't get caught up in modifications. find a reliable gun, learn it and shoot the chit out of it. And don't discount the value of a good holster AND belt. Also, any formal training is about the best thing you can do, there is nothing you can read or learn online that can subsitute for good formal training and continued practice.
     
    Last edited: Oct 8, 2007
  6. bigboostdsm

    bigboostdsm New Member

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    I'd go with something in 9mm so that you can still practice for relatively cheap and have a good round for carrying.

    How long does it take to get a permit in your state? If the wait is a full 3 months, will you have money to buy another gun when it gets there? If so you could get a .22 to practice with now then pick up another gun for carry later. If not, just pick up a 9mm to practice with and carry.

    I got my G19 as my first gun because I could only afford one gun in the period between purchasing it and getting my permit. I have no regrets. I am planning on picking up a .22 in the next couple weeks simply because I can't hardly even afford to shoot 9mm as much as I do.
     
  7. 90free400e

    90free400e New Member

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    thanks for all the input I really appreciate it. As far as the wait goes, I'm not sure how long the wait is but I doubt I would have the funds to purchase both as I currently do not work and just have saved money from summer. I think I will go ahead and purchase a carry gun, but I'm still not sure on caliber. There is alot more variety outside of 10mm, but my view is if I'm going to buy a handgun to carry I may as well buy one I will carry for a long time. I really wish Steyr would make the M-series in 10mm
     
  8. lt1aggie

    lt1aggie what?

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    Have you considered buying a used gun? If you wait and really shop areound, you can usually find a somewhat of a decent deal. If the gun has been taken care of, there shouldn't be any problems buying used. This could save you some money.
     
  9. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    Troof in that. don't feel the need to dive into any gun or you could be making a big mistake. And don't go to a gun store hoping the gun shop commando behind the counter is going to "steer" you into a "good gun". I get so mad every time I hear "oh, well the guy behind the counter told me to get this...". Most of the times, those guys don't know any better and are just recycling BS stories they hear. Not to say they are all dumbasses, for the most part most of them are.

    When I go to a gunshop, I just point at the gun and tell him to meet me at the register with the paper works. I don't need to hear his stories, my mind is made up.

    Learn and do your research BEFORE you go, so you know exactly what you want. And most importantly, handle and shoot as many as you can. It has to fit "you".
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2007
  10. Ebtromba

    Ebtromba Active Member

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    excellent advice. he should probably go with .40 or 9mm. or maybe he is a young chuck norris and .45 would be good for him. but 10mm...on a budget?? someday, young grasshopper, someday.
     
  11. Thunderbear

    Thunderbear Yggdrasil's Forester.

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    You and me both. Until then, I'll play with my Diet 10mm M40A1 :o

    The S9A1 is cheaper to shoot and a hell of a lot more fun though. Double taps with the recoil of a hot .22 :eek3:
     
  12. [DWI]

    [DWI] Master of Nothing

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    Is that how much you have to spend on the gun or total?

    It is pertinent to know what you can budget on a monthly basis, since you will likely have to buy a good holster for concealed carry and sometimes you may have to try a few to find one that works for you. Prices range widely in the land of holsters. Secondly it is a good idea if they are offered in your area to take some additional classes or competitions that do a little more than just stand you at the firing line.

    Lastly it is important to know what you have as far as monthly budget for ammo purchases. Being able to afford practice is always important.

    That being said, I personally chose to start out with 30-06 and 45 ACP and carry a .357, but I found it was helpful to switch to a 22 and 9mm for practice and learning, they are a little more forgiving. A 9mm will still pack a good punch and hitting a target is better than scaring them with sound.
     
  13. KNYTE

    KNYTE I'm Not Kidding.

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    Glock 19.
     
  14. Soybomb

    Soybomb New Member

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    I love 10mm but you need to get a 9mm. For effective self defense you need to practice often and if you don't reload 10mm will kill you. Leave the 10mm for further down the road.
     
  15. minus

    minus Damn you, Damn the Broccoli, and Damn the Wright B

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    You can get a used glock for 400 or 450 which leaves you money for a good holster and ammo. I will stay out of the caliber discussion.
     
  16. krott5333

    krott5333 Guest

    if you dont have the funds to purchase both, you dont have the funds to feed the 10mm enough to be happy.

    Just get a 9mm and you'll be set. G19 or G26.
     
  17. wetwillie

    wetwillie New Member

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    My suggestion, eventhough I'm new to guns, is to get what you want. I was told over and over again to get a 1911 because blah, blah, blah. I didn't like it as much as the M&P...it just didn't feel right in my hands. So I got the M&P 9mm and now when I go to the range, I'm very happy. It's my gun, it's my decision and it's what I like!! I don't care if others think it's foolish to carry a 9mm or all the arguments about stopping power....for me, it's more important to have something I like and feel comfortable with.

    Why?? Because when it's something I like and feel comfortable with, I'm more likely to practice with it. I'm more likely to WANT to go to the range, I'm more likely to learn about my gun and how to best use the tool that I have.

    My boss says, "You know what the best type of gun to have in a gun fight is? The one your have in your hands." So that kind of ended all the debate for me between calibers. I got something I liked and that was affordable and that I could spend a lot of time practicing with...without going into debt to do so.
     

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