A&P first attempt at studio portraits

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Eric Happy Meal, Apr 6, 2006.

  1. Eric Happy Meal

    Eric Happy Meal New Member

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    havent done any PP with them yet.
     
  2. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    move the light up higher. shadows should come down, not across, and you don't want to be able to see insider her nose.

    shoot a a larger aperature or move the subject father from the background, you can see the wrinkles in the muslin.

    a hair or accent light coming from behind would have really made the 2nd shot great, just kinda adds an extra deminsion to the photo and helps seperate the subject from the background.

    the framing/cropping is kinda dull. vertical shots work better usually as portraits in studios.

    good start though, keep it up.
     
  3. mobbarley

    mobbarley Active Member

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    I agree you should try some in portrait orienation. Also try some slighty side-on shots rather than front-on. Front on gets boring & combined with the hat makes her look like she is in for kemotherapy. The 2nd shot is good, shows some hair, but maybe get her to try moving her feet as well so her neck doesnt look so large.
     
  4. EE CUMMINGS

    EE CUMMINGS aka RobHuang

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    What equipment was used?
     
  5. Eric Happy Meal

    Eric Happy Meal New Member

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    350d, 28mm f1.8, and two tungsten lights for the first pic, and one for the second two.

    and about the wrinkles in the backdrop, i only had a couple feet to play with since i did this all in class, and it seems like my 28 is a little too small for in there, and the 50 is too long.
     
  6. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    can you move back too? or is it just a really small backdrop? 28mm is way to wide for a studio portrait. 85-135 is preferable, and up to 200+ for a good head shot.

    When you use a wide angle (yes 28mm on a 1.6x isn't that wide anymore) it distorts the image to a degree, so whatever is closest to the lens will appear larger, like the nose or hands.

    Working with a longer lens allows for a more compressed image, that will throw the background out of focus more, and maintain a face/body that is in proper proportion.
     

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