Fanless videocard to support 2560x1600

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by GunboatDiplomat, Sep 2, 2006.

  1. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    Now that Core 2 is out I'm considering upgrading my system and, if I were to go through all that trouble, I will also upgrade my system to be fanless and upgrade my monitor while I'm at it.

    However, there is a small kink in my plan. I can't find a fanless videocard that can support a screen resolution of 2560x1600. Can anyone recommend such a card or a card with a third party replacement for the fan?

    Thank you...
     
  2. DAN513

    DAN513 OT Supporter

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    can't you get a normal ati or geforce card, remove the existing heatsink and fan and go with a zalman heat pipe setup? As long as you have enough flow through the case, you should be fine, also as long as you're not gaming.
     
  3. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    sure, but it would average at 80 C idle XD
     
  4. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    As long as it doesn't overheat under load, it doesn't matter what temperature it idles at.
     
  5. xinster

    xinster New Member

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    doesnt a high idle temp decrease computer life?
     
  6. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    What about compatibility? How do I know if something, like the Thermaltake CL-G0009, is compatible with, say, the GeForce 7600 GS?
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Not really. Integrated circuits are made of single-crystal silicon, which is to say there aren't any fault lines in the silicon that could crack just from temperature changes. The silicon is coated in ceramic, which is an excellent conductor of heat. The circuit boards are fiber-reinforced, and they're laced with metal that can help distribute the heat evenly.

    The only thing that a high idle temperature can wear out is ball bearings -- like in hard drives -- but they've been subject to high temperatures and shitty airflow for so long that they can last for years even under bad conditions. Usually it's fans that fail, and usually they fail because their bearings get clogged with dust and they grind themselves to pieces or seize up from sticky, dusty grease.
     
  8. tony

    tony Guest

    :eek3: the 6200 is fanless :hsugh:
     
  9. tony

    tony Guest

    :ugh2: yes, the goal is the cooler the better :wiggle:
     
  10. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    Perhaps you didn't read the thread title...
     
  11. Clarity

    Clarity New Member

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    okay o_O
     
  12. droopz

    droopz New Member

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    Like its been said, get any decent late model card and throw on a good Zalman or watercool it.
     
  13. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Digital devices either work right or they don't. They don't ever work better than their design, and they don't sag under load -- one error and the system crashes, no errors and the system continues operating.
     
  14. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    Can someone help me find this video card for sale, anywhere? It may just be what I'm looking for.
    Thank you...
     
  15. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Is the Gigabyte 7600 for sale yet? It has a fanless version, and it's about as current as you can get.
     
  16. Jkuao

    Jkuao New Member

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  17. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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  18. o2

    o2 Witty Title Here OT Supporter

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    Whats the advantage of a fanless video card? less noise?
     
  19. mace

    mace i don't read

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  20. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Less chance of card failure. Anything that uses a moving part to help it function properly is at risk of dying if that moving part stops. Kinda like people, when they have heart attacks.
     
  21. mace

    mace i don't read

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    Don't you think the added heat of a fanless setup is going to cause the components to die faster? I mean. Heat degrades components over time.
     
  22. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Fanless components make less heat than fan-cooled components do. That's why they don't need fans.

    Integrated circuits don't fail from prolonged heat exposure, they fail from overheating. So long as the heat stays below the IC's tolerance, the IC will last for years.

    What I meant by "less chance of card failure" is that, if a fan-cooled card has a faulty fan that burns out and you don't notice, it will overheat. Fanless cards, since they don't rely on fans to begin with, are immune to this particular cause of failure. That's not to say they can't overheat; certainly, if you have a case with atrocious ventilation, the heat will build up and kill the card anyway, but keeping the card cooler by adding a fan doesn't make it work better; all it does is allow a card that would normally overheat to be able to work at all.
     
  23. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Nice AV, by the way. Is that you in the pic, or did you find that on the internet?
     
  24. GunboatDiplomat

    GunboatDiplomat New Member

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    Wow, so it looks like I'll be upgrading my monitor sooner than expected. My CRT is beginning to show it's final death throws so I'm suddenly in the market for my fanless video card. I have two (hopefully) final questions concerning a new card...

    First, the monitor I'm considering requires two DVI connections (it's a single monitor that acts as if it were two). So, does this necessitate a video card with Dual-Link DVI? I ask because there are many cards that NewEgg claims are single DVI but they also claim to support 2560x1600, a resolution that exceeds the DVI specification...

    Secondly, if a video cards supports HDTV out, does that mean it also supports standard definition TV out? I ask because many cards claim to support HDTV out but there are some that claim to support S-cable/composite out.

    Thank you...
     
  25. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If the monitor has two plugs, the video card needs to have two plugs. It's pretty simple like that.

    All SXGA-capable video cards can output an HDTV signal, because SXGA has the same number of pixel rows as HDTV does; it's just a matter of getting the proper converter. A lot of video cards come with a converter for that very purpose (the one I linked to comes with one), but if you have to buy a separate converter, you're looking for one that turns a DVI connector into an HDMI connector or component video connectors (red, green, blue round plugs).
     

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