A&P Explain White Balance to me.

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Dnepr, Apr 15, 2005.

  1. Dnepr

    Dnepr Guest

  2. dtfromep

    dtfromep New Member

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    You have to input what type of lighting is available because of varying color temperatures. For example, a flash is going to make your whites more bluish while a tungsten bulb (lightbulb) will make the whites more yellow. The idea behind WB is to get the whites, and subsequently all the other colors, as true as possible.

    On how to work it properly, I am still figuring that out myself. Getting better at it, though.
     
  3. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Light is measured not only in "how much" but by it's color temperture, expressed in "degrees Kelvin". A lightbulb on your table lamp is around 2300 degrees Kelvin while daylight is about 6300 degrees Kelvin. The lower the Kelvin number, the "warmer" or more yellowish the light while the higher the number, the "cooler" or more blue is the light.


    Chip cameras must be shown what pure white looks like under these varying light conditions in order for it to reproduce colors correctly. This is why it's important to aim your camera on a piece of white paper or other pure white object so that your camera "learns" what white looks like.

    Film cameras don't do this because the photographer uses different film and/or filters to correct the color balance.
     
  4. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    Jcolman = :bowdown:

    Additionally, white balance essentially biases how your camera interprets colors, primarily in the yellow/blue channel. While it's not exactly the same as a physical color filter in front of your lens, you can use white balance as a tool to enhance colors, provided you understand the lighting. White balance does not have to make things look "correct" as long as you understand what you want from your picture.
     
  5. Dnepr

    Dnepr Guest

    Thanks all! :coold:
     
  6. WiLL

    WiLL Active Member

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    So, if I have a white sheet of paper, and stick it in front of the camera. WHat do I do then? How do I get the camera to "lock" that info? Do I do this for every shot? Explain this like I am a total noob :o
     
  7. hash browns

    hash browns lolcathlon champion OT Supporter

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    :hs:

    It depends on your camera.

    Normally, you take a well-exposed picture of the white object and tell your camera to use that as a reference for what white is supposed to be.

    On a Nikon, you hold down the "WB" button and rotate the dial to the "PRE" selection. Hold down the WB button at this PRE setting until the camera prompts you in the status LCD -- take a picture of the white thing, filling the frame, proper exposure, and your camera will say "Good" or "No Gd".
     
  8. WiLL

    WiLL Active Member

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    Thanks. :hs:
     
  9. in for later :hs:
     

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