Exercises to improve throwing and hitting strength (baseball)?

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by GilgaMesH, Jun 8, 2005.

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  1. GilgaMesH

    GilgaMesH Active Member

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    Are there any specific exercises that baseball players should be focusing on in hopes to improve arm strength and power hitting?
     
  2. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    obliques / strong core would be a good start
     
  3. kronik85

    kronik85 New Member

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  4. Ceaze

    Ceaze https://hearthis.at/DoYouEvenUplift Moderator

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    Here are a list of tips that should help you out. First and foremost I always look at the muscles that are the most important for a particular sport and the muscles most likely to get injured. As a baseball player you must always work to strengthen the rotator cuff muscles. Since everything you do in baseball is in front of you so to speak, and you are always internally rotated you need to work the opposing muscle groups. Aside from the external rotators, you must focus on upper back, rhomboids, lower traps, etc. Lats are the most important upper body muscles involved in hitting and of course you should work on forearm strength.

    Rotational ab work is also of enormous benefit for baseball players. But here is something that you don't regularly hear: A baseball player usually bats either righty or lefty. That player swings in one direction an inordinate amount of times. This can lead to imbalances and problems. Back pain can result because of this. What I recommend is that baseball players swing the bat in the opposite direction as much as they can so as not to develop these kinds of problems. Also during the season, we will focus more of our rotational work in the opposite direction of the way they swing. You always hear about golfers getting back pain and this is the reason why. I think the reason why you don't hear as much about it in baseball is because baseball players tend to be quite a bit more muscular and in shape than golfers. However, there is always that risk, and if it doesn't rear it's head at the current time it will sometime down the road as you get older.

    As far as being "speed oriented'" goes, you have to focus on improving the strength of your posterior chain and work on running mechanics and multidirectional speed drills. Although the basepath dictates that you run in somewhat of a straight line, the ability to rapidly change directions when running the bases or trying to steal, and also to react to where a ball is hit when you are playing defense is of the utmost importance.

    To improve your throwing power from the outfield, you have to do the same thing you have to do to improve your speed — strengthen your posterior chain and torso strenth. That is where all your power comes from, not your arm.

    -Jason Ferruggia
     
  5. G-n-P

    G-n-P New Member

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    get a tornado ball
     
  6. JordanClarkson

    JordanClarkson OT Supporter

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    You improve your arm strength by throwing more and having proper mechanics. Throw long toss every day. Rotator cuff work and light shoulder work (front raises). Arm speed drills where you work to get the arm through the throwing zone as quick as possible while maintaining good mechanics...basically powering through the last 3/4 of arm travel. Staying in great physical shape helps prevent injuries too as it allows your body to handle the punishment.

    For mechanics, when you are set, arm up, front foot planted, body perpendicular (as opposed to squared) to where you're throwing, your chin should be right above your belt, your weight kept at the middle and slightly back.

    Forearm and grip strength are very important and are for hitting as well. Core strength is useful too, especially for preventing injuries. Many baseball players do have back problems, even forcing Mattingly and McGwire to retire prematurely. Work on flexibility in the pecs, like simple lying pec stretches and benching with a cambered bar if you have one. Contact with the ball should also be started in the same "power position" as mentioned above, with your front foot planted, chin above the belt buckle, weight kept slightly back, which will allow the most generated power to get the bat through the zone as you shift that weight forward and make contact.
     
  7. JoeyJoJoJuniorShabadoo

    JoeyJoJoJuniorShabadoo Live Free or Die

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    throw more, hit more?
     
  8. TOAD

    TOAD New Member

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    A lot of both is technique. You don't have to be overly strong to have a cannon for an arm.
     
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