A&P exercise in filters

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by Valence, May 23, 2005.

  1. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    shots were taken outdoors, 5 pm in texas. Bright afternoon sunlight, camera was a panasonic fz 10. w/ lens hood and uv/haze filter, and neutral density filter, .5
    The intent was to gauge the effect, if any, a uv and neutral density filter would have on a macro shot (since this was a quick experiment the subject matter would have had to be something local, backyard)
    these shots were cropped in photoshop, no digital improvements nor processing (i e auto levels) was done to these shots


    first shot is with the neutral density and the uv filter

    [​IMG]
    This second shot was without the nd filter and with the uv filter

    [​IMG]
    and the final shot was without either the nd or the uv filter
    [​IMG]


    Notice how in each shot, from 1 to 3, the images progressively get worse.
    The colors are not as bright, and appear rather dingy. There is not as much contrast. I believe that a UV / Haze filter is a must, at all times, and a neutral density filter (which is like putting a piece of dark tinted glass over your lens) prevents color washout from bright sunlight.

    Next experiment, taking zoom photos of jetliners flying over for a landing since they fly right over my house
     
  2. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    The previous photos in the same order WITH contrast, brightness color balance corrected in photoshop utilizing "auto levels"

    Again, with UV with ND

    [​IMG]

    With UV No ND

    [​IMG]

    No UV No ND

    [​IMG]

    There is still a very slight difference in contrast and color hue between the photo's
    I need to find something sturdy enough to make a white card to create a customer white balance everytime I shoot something with my digital camera, Improves color tone and color correctness dramatically
     
  3. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    questions, comments, anyone?
     
  4. sony

    sony Active Member

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    Whenever you put anything in front of the glass of your lens, you're going to experience image quality loss. Whether the image quality loss will be significant or not depends on 1) the quality of glass, 2) the situation, and 3) the coating on the filter. Most coated filters are either single coated, doublecoated, or some even more than two. The problem is that most lenses are coated 9 or more times, while a filter might only have one or two coats on a single side.

    Having a filter over the lens usually means that you're a bit more prone to flare, ghosting, etc. even with an expensive multi coated piece of glass there. Many pros will argue that naked glass is the way to go, while others say that the loss of quality isn't significant enough to make an impact and that having a filter over your lens protects your investment, which offers you a larger benefit than the image quality loss costs.

    It doesn't really matter what camp you're in because I believe everyone can agree that putting anything in front of your lens will lower the quality, no matter how small. And most will agree that putting cheap filters in front of your lens is a gaurantee that the image quality will drop substantially.

    What kind of filters are you using?
     
  5. sony

    sony Active Member

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    Also, having coatings on your lens will cut the light. Most UV filters will cut out like 1/10th of a stop of light, the ND filter is designed specifically to block light, and a polarizer usually blocks out anywhere from a 1/3rd to 1+ stops of light depending on the direction of the sun and how you have the polarizer set.

    This change of light that the lens/sensor sees will probably change the metering, your shutter speed /aperture and in turn have an affect on how your image looks.
     
  6. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    image loss, maybe
    If the image is crap due to a haze (smog) or washed out colors (direct sunlight, harsh lighting) then there's nothing to lose anyway
     
  7. D_Wade

    D_Wade Yeah, that was nice...now you should get going

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    when you say you used a 'neutral density filter', is this the same as a polarizer?
     
  8. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    no

    a polarizer cuts the glare and as a result depends the colors int he sky and allows you to better see through things like water and glass

    a ND filter blocks all the light evenly or selectively depending on the filter, to lower the tonal range difference between the shadows and highlights. These are great for architectural and landscape shots. To balance a night shot of a building to properly expose for the building and not blow out hte lights would be near impossible to do other wise, same with trying to pull detail inthe shadows when theres a bright sky you want a rich tone and not blown out
     
  9. Valence

    Valence Gustav Refugee

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    nah a nd filter is like a piece of glass with window tint on it

    it's dark, it allows less light to flow through the lens, allowing for longer shutter speeds or larger apetures to be used during extremely bright light
    also keeps color from washing out in bright sunlight, i e noon shooting
     

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