ethernet cable

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by M4A1, Jan 20, 2004.

  1. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    I'm looking to run a 100 ft. cable from my router to a computer on the third floor. I don't know which type of cat 5 cable to get. There's cat5, cat5e, and cat6 :confused:. Which should I order?

    How about this? Would that do? (I need black)
     
  2. MP

    MP New Member

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    Cat5e is just a "new" version of cat5. Supposedly it can handle a gigabit network easyer but you really don't need it. Regular cat5 will do just fine for you.

    cat6 is a crossover or "patch" cable. You don't need to worry about those.
     
  3. GeekDrew

    GeekDrew aka DataDrew

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    Ludelover... do you by chance work in the industry?

    We run gig over copper using Cat5e... and I can't get it to run at all over Cat5. I only purchase Cat5e or Cat6.

    And no, Cat6 is NOT a crossover or "patch" cable. Cat6 is just a newer specification than Cat5...
     
  4. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    Huh?

    Cat5 and Cat5e are basically the same thing, same specs but 5e's have to pass more certifications (cat5's should be able to pass the same certifications but are not required to).

    Cat6 is a newer standard that needs to be able a higher frequency. (100mhz for cat5 and cat5e to 250mhz of cat6.)

    Any can be straight through or crossover (or rolled if you ever had a need). The only difference I know of between 'network' and 'patch' cables is 'patch' cables are sometimes multi-stranded wires.

    You should be fine with any cat5 or higher cable....
     
  5. MP

    MP New Member

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    my bad. I got things mixed up, but doesn't cat5e go up to 350mhz?
     
  6. Mirlyn

    Mirlyn Guest

    No. Cat6 can be a patch cable. Cat6 can be a crossover cable. It can be whatever you want it to be. The Category rating only describes the makeup of the cable, not how its crimped. You can make a crossover cable out of anything, even Cat3.

    They are all the same copper cable with the major differences being material and twists per inch. Cat5 supports any 10/100 twisted-pair networking. 5e is rated to officially (I think) support gigabit-over-copper in short distances. Cat6 supports gigabit to a longer distance than 5e because it has a tighter twist (the cables interweave more often than 5/5e).

    Cat5 will work fine. So will the Cat6 in your link. You could get it cheaper crimping it yourself, but I'd just recommend spending the $20 and getting it premade. Saves you the hassle. :)
     
  7. Mirlyn

    Mirlyn Guest

    Ran gigabit over Cat3 before, but it was ugly. ;) The only thing holding us back from using it was our patch panel. Recrimped the cabling and bypassed the patch panels and wall-plates and everything ran at 1000, more or less.
     
  8. GeekDrew

    GeekDrew aka DataDrew

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    Running at 1000 over Cat3 just seems painful to me. I've gotten 1000 to work over Cat5, but not extraordinarily reliably. Cat5e has helped me a LOT.
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2004
  9. GeekDrew

    GeekDrew aka DataDrew

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    "should" being the operative word... we have a contractor testing and relabeling all of our data drops district-wide right now... it's amazing how many of our drops were installed as Cat5e but are only passing as Cat5. :rant2:
     
  10. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    By specs no it can't but technically it SHOULD be able to... But as listed here some cannot seem to get gigabit to work over Cat5 and I have a 24port gigabit blade all using cat5 up to 50 feet (no reason to go longer)...

    The standards to cat5-cat6. (Don't ask what these mean, what lines I understand I could not explain..) Note: the N/A are specs that were not defined for this category (i.e. the ONLY difference between CAT5 and CAT5e).

    Category 5
    Category 5e
    Category 6

    Frequency
    100 MHz
    100 MHz
    250 MHz

    Attenuation (Min. at 100 MHz)
    22dB
    22dB
    19.8dB

    Characteristic Impedance
    100 ohms ± 15%
    100 ohms ± 15%
    100 ohms ± 15%

    NEXT (Min. at 100 MHz)
    32.3dB
    35.3dB
    44.3dB

    PS-NEXT (Min. at 100 MHz)
    N/A
    32.3dB
    42.3dB

    ELFEXT (Min. at 100 MHz)
    N/A
    23.8dB
    27.8dB

    PS-ELFEXT (Min. at 100 MHz)
    N/A
    20.8dB
    24.8dB

    Return Loss (Min. at 100 MHz)
    16.0dB
    20.1dB
    20.1dB

    Delay Skew (Max. per 100 m)
    N/A
    45 ns
    45 ns
     
    Last edited: Jan 21, 2004
  11. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    Thanks! The one in the link is what I'll purchase.
     
  12. Mirlyn

    Mirlyn Guest

    More than painful. The next day we pulled new Cat5e for the drop.

    Nothing screams reliability like old phone lines running gigabit. ;)
     
  13. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    And you thought it was a simple question...
     
  14. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    Yup. :o
     
  15. Rob

    Rob OT Supporter

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    I still think it is. :p
     
  16. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    OH YEAH
     
  17. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    Is there something to link two cat6 cables together incase 100' isnt long enough? What's it called?
     
  18. GeekDrew

    GeekDrew aka DataDrew

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    There are devices out there to do just that... what they are called, however, I can't remember. In general, it's not a good idea (IMHO) to run a single cable more than 100 feet without a repeater in line.
     
  19. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    I think your looking for a coupler.
    http://www.newegg.com/app/viewProductDesc.asp?description=12-117-518&depa=1

    If you need to go over 100 feet you probably would be better off making your own. If I remember correctly the max length of Cat5,5e and 6 is 328 feet (100 meters)...
     
  20. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    Why? Other then there being a break in line.
     
  21. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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  22. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    OKAY, change of plans! :o

    I've decided to order two 50' cat. 6 cables since the 100' is out of stock for another week. :-\

    Will this coupler work even though is it only cat. 5e ? (the cables are are Cat. 6 Patch Cable. It says it can be used as Cat. 5e/Cat.5)

    Should I order these three items tomorrow? TIA!
     
  23. GeekDrew

    GeekDrew aka DataDrew

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    Disregard that. As usual, Keyzs corrected me. For some reason I had 100 feet in my head... and then he mentioned 100 meters. It's likely he's correct, and I was thinking of the wrong measurement unit.

    I know the technology, I swear. I guess I just forget everything possible after I get off work at 4 pm? lol I haven't actually needed that measurement in over a year... wouldn't surprise me if I had forgotten it :p
     
  24. Keyzs

    Keyzs OT Supporter

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    So what are you going to do if you need more than 100 feet???

    JUST DO IT! For a normal home network you should be fine, and probably any network. Trying to force gigabit consistantly through MAY give you some problems. Its just not good practice in the business world to use couplers, mainly a conception thing... You will not push the limits of cat5 let alone 5e or 6 (Your not planning on putting 150 PC's/and MACs on the other end are you?)

    We actually have two 20 footers connected with a coupler running gigabit to our corporate email server, I was told there was no 50 footer handy at the time they put it in... Not pretty but its been working fine for months.
     
  25. M4A1

    M4A1 :)

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    The cable will run from a router on the first floor of my house to a PC on the third floor. I'm thinking of ordering three 50 ft. cat. 6 cables and 2 couplers. Will this effect the speed at all? The cable connection is only 3mbps. :)

    And what is this "gigabit" lan you speak of? Is it faster then 10/100? :confused:
     

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