Equipping home gym

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by N-Word-Jim, Jul 15, 2007.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. N-Word-Jim

    N-Word-Jim Cure for boredom

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    7,754
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    Hey,

    Just got back from working 80hrs a week for two months and living out of town. I go into my gym today to get a workout in and even though they're in the other room fighting (MMA gym, gay fucking miletich shit) I'm told I can't be in the other room lifting as the "gym is closed today". Nevermind that I've been there four days a week 50weeks a year for two years (except for the last two months of course) and they all know me... i've got to go.

    So fuck them, time to do it myself.

    I'm 6'3" 200-210 (varies depending upon how strict my diet is) and my numbers are (rough, cause I can't remember exact):

    S: 355
    B: 275
    D: 405

    So I don't think I need anything that crazy like the shit at elitefts, though no doubt it is the best money can buy.

    I am also happy where I am at strength-wise so i don't expect my numbers to change much.

    I guess what I really want advice on is where to find a good rack, good bars (gotta have at least 2 with hand-slicing knurling), bumper plates and/or nice rubber floor mats, dumbbells, pull up bar, and possibly dumbbell racks

    I have a good bench, though I wouldn't turn away any suggestions for another nice one. I also have the elitefts squat box.

    I'm not going to list a budget, but off the top of my head I'd like to keep it under $2500 if possible.
     
  2. Limp_Brisket

    Limp_Brisket New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 2, 2006
    Messages:
    48,422
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Utah
    no gym for home?
     
  3. N-Word-Jim

    N-Word-Jim Cure for boredom

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    7,754
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    not yet
     
  4. N-Word-Jim

    N-Word-Jim Cure for boredom

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    7,754
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    Anyone used pendlay's stuff? I'm a member at midwestbarbell and he's pretty respected around there.

    This seems to be a pretty good deal... I know he's producing his own stuff now: http://store.wfwclub.com/ulbuse.html

    I bet if I send him a grand he'll send me two sets of the plates (4x45,4x35,4x25) with the bar.

    I already have a cheapie olympic set with bar, so I could use that in the rack for squat/bench and I generally use dumbbells for benching moreso than barbell
     
  5. ignition

    ignition Active Member

    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2005
    Messages:
    19,370
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    wheres a good place to get a cage ? how much do they usually run ? i need something for squats and chin ups
     
  6. N-Word-Jim

    N-Word-Jim Cure for boredom

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2003
    Messages:
    7,754
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Midwest
    Start your own thread you nigger
     
  7. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    for $2500 you can get basically anything you'd need for a non competitive home gym


    You should always try to find weights locally... Play it Again Sports, Sports Authority, WalMart, and CraigsList - the shipping kills you
     
  8. Cumstang02

    Cumstang02 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 17, 2005
    Messages:
    6,374
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Is it in yet?
    Play it again sports...the department stores are a waste of your time.

    Brands to look for in a used store:
    Pacific Fitness ( Now Precor )
    Tuff Stuff
    Hoist
    Parabody ( Now LifeFitness )

    You shouldn't pay more than 300.00 for a used cage, but keep in mind that any additional add-ons won't fit.

    If you're going to look new:
    Hoist is probably your best option because they have "non-commercial" models that bring the price down to realistic numbers.
    There is also a brand call Keys fitness. They have a unit call the KF-PT which is a nice power cage with a lot of options availible but its color is love or hate.

    Bumper plates are easy to get a hold of from any weight supplier and don't cost much. Bar is the same but knurling wise, Cap has some hand chewing knurling where as other brands tone it down a little.
     
  9. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    I'm in the process of doing the same thing and have done a pretty thorough job of researching this stuff. Here's what I'll do - below is a cut and paste of the file I've put together that basically has everything you need in terms of budgeting and equipment, etc. Some of the stuff is optional, but it should give you a decent overview of what to expect.

    I would reiterate, the best place to get stuff is on Craig's List. I'm gradually building up my gym, one piece at a time. So far, I've spent $65 and have an olympic bar and 250 lbs of olympic plates. Also have a line on a power rack for $200 and dumbbells 20-5o lbs for $85. Craig's List is the best. Play it Again Sports is a distant second.

    Power Rack - $250-$400
    $299 - http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/powerracks.html
    $325 - http://www.ironcompany.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=2471
    $395 - PowerTec - Includes dip bars and chin bar - http://www.afitnessequipment.com/PtPowerCage.html
    http://www.bigfitness.com/powerrack.html
    $250 - Body Solid Powerline - http://stores.ebay.com/Fitness-Efficient
    $239 - Powerline - http://www.fitnessfactory.com/Item.aspx?ItemID=327&ItemLabel=PPR200:+Powerline+Power+Rack


    Barbell and Weights - $179.99
    http://www.sportsunlimitedinc.com/york-300-lb-olympic-weight-set.html
    http://www.jesupgym.com/products.htm?cid=16


    Barbell - $50-$200
    http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/im-0022bspl.html
    http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/im-0022.html
    http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/powerbars.html


    Weights - $250
    http://www.ironcompany.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=1873
    http://www.sportsunlimitedinc.com/york-300-lb-iso-grip-olympic-barbell-set.html


    Bench -
    $159 (Free shipping) - Super Bench - http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/90655.html
    $99 - Flat Bench - http://www.newyorkbarbells.com/5900.html


    Dumbells - $150 Standard
    $50 w/ shipping - Fitness Efficient - Olympic Dumbell Handles - http://stores.ebay.com/Fitness-Efficient
    $300 - Powerblocks
    Olympic Dumbell Handles - $79.99 -- http://www.ironcompany.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=513
    Olympic Dumbell Handles - $29.99 at Dick's (?)

    Collars
    $1 each - http://www.fullcirclepadding.com/index.cfm?event=ProductDetail&ProductID=604


    GHR
    http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dl...R40&_trksid=m37&satitle=180136778184%09&fvi=1
    http://stores.ebay.com/gadgets-tools-and-more

    Dip Belt
    $18.95 - http://www.flexcart.com/members/elitefts/default.asp?m=PD&cid=299&pid=1782


    Weight Tree
    $67 - http://www.fitnessdestination.com/df7500.htm

    Flooring

    CHECK WALMART FOR MATS - $19.99 each(?)
    4'x10' Roll - 1/4" Thick - $100 - FREE SHIPPING - http://www.shopgreatmats.com/shop4/cart.php?m=product_list&c=37
    2'x2' Squares - $27.00 each - 1/4" Thick - http://www.shopgreatmats.com/shop4/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=1639
    Spartan 24"x24"x1/2" Interlocking Mats with Edges - 9 pack - $30.00 - http://www.amazon.com/Spartan-x24-I...=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1182649557&sr=1-19
    http://www.amazon.com/Ironman-Floor...=UTF8&s=sporting-goods&qid=1182649965&sr=1-35
    4' x 6' x 1/2" thick (1-10 mats) = $36.00 ea. - http://www.jesupgym.com/products.htm?cid=21


    Floor Layouts:
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]



    FreeSpotter (Optional, obviously)
    $129 - http://www.shermworks.com/


    General Sites:
    http://www.newyorkbarbells.com
    http://stores.ebay.com/Jesup-Gym-Equipment
    http://www.fitnessfactory.com/
    http://www.mcsports.com/home/index.jsp
    Build Your Own Home Gym Article - http://www.elitefts.com/documents/home_gym.htm
     
  10. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    Also, for bonus goodness, a solid article by Jim Wendler on the subject:

    How to Kick Ass in a One Car Garage

    By Jim Wendler

    For www.EliteFTS.com

    I’m not going to write an introduction on why commercial gyms aren’t the best equipped or the best atmosphere for powerlifting. It’s been beaten to death and we all know it’s true. So instead of trying to get you all worked up on another Sick of Your Gym rant, I’m going to tell you how we, The Confederate Barbell Club, did it.
    The Confederate Barbell Club was located in Lexington, Kentucky. It began when Kevin Deweese, Jason Adams and I got together and started plotting how the hell we were going to train without the aid of the University of Kentucky. We were used to the plush equipment and temperature controlled atmosphere that the UK gave us. We traded this in for a small, sometimes unpleasant one car garage. I wouldn’t have done it any differently.
    The Set Up
    Jason rented a one car garage in his apartment complex and this soon became our home. This is what we outfitted the garage with in the beginning –
    • Power Rack
    • Dumbbell Bench (to be used inside power rack)
    • Modified Glute Ham Raise (Jason got this at a garage sale and we had to modify and weld the hell out of it; we actually used the wall as a footplate for awhile)
    • Olympic Dumbbell Handles
    • Texas Squat Bar
    • Texas Power Bar
    • Lat Pull Machine
    • A ton of weight
    • A lot of chalk
    • Bands
    • Chains for benching/squatting
    • Chains for suspended good mornings
    • 2, 3, 4, 5 boards for board pressing
    • A couple of vats of liniment
    • Fan
    • Space Heater
    • Sled
    • Stereo
    • Various lat pull handles
    • Plyo box that UK threw out that we commandeered for box squatting.
    Eventually we added these pieces:
    • Pro Reverse Hyperextension
    • Power Bench Rack (2x2)
    • Glute Ham Raise
    • Safety Squat Bar
    • Rackable Cambered Squat Bar
    • Jump Stretch Sumo Platform
    For those just starting their own place, you really only need the basics. I would start with the following pieces:
    • 2x2 Power Rack
    • Box Squat Box
    • 2, 3, 4, 5 boards
    • Chalk
    • Flat Dumbbell Bench
    • Texas Power Bar
    • A lot of weight
    After you have this initial set up, I would look into the following pieces. Having talked to hundreds of people that have set up their own home gyms, these are the more popular items that they get to complete their weight room. Remember that some of these are going to be dependant on space or lack thereof.
    • Glute Ham Raise
    • Reverse Hyper
    • Lat Pulldown machine (and some attachments; usually the DD handle, a triceps rope, and a straight bar)
    • 45 degree back raise
    • Dumbbells or dumbbell handles
    • Specialty bars (these include the safety squat bar, rackable cambered squat bar, squat bar, deadlift bar, cambered bench bar)
    • Monolift (this can be done!)
    • Bands (I recommend getting the band pack as it’s probably your best deal)
    • Chains (For most lifters, a complete set of chains and one extra pair of the 5/8” chain will work well)
    If you have these things, you are well on your way to building your own gym. From there you can expand based on your needs and the space that you have.
    So the big pieces in our weight room were the rack, the GHR, the Reverse Hyperextension, the bench rack and the lat pulldown. These 6 items took up the most floor space and everything was stacked around it. During the summer, to make more space, we would move the GHR outside. While this set up seems (and it was) very cramped, it was actually a good thing. Because we were in tight quarters, everyone was forced to be attentive to each other; coaching form, spotting and giving encouragement. There wasn’t an option to wander around and do nothing. Also, because there wasn’t a lot of space, whatever max effort lift was being done, everyone did it. It wasn’t like one person could do cambered bar good mornings and someone else would be doing box squats or some kind of pull. This also gave us a sense of camaraderie and teamwork. Even during our assistance lifts, there wasn’t much deviation from the pack.
    So how did we set all this up and make it work? The first thing that Jason did was lay plywood down, covering the entire garage. He stacked 2 (two) ¾ in. pieces of plywood on top of each other. To this plywood, we bolted the power rack, the Reverse Hyperextension, and the Power Bench Rack. Inside the squat rack we stapled thin carpeting. This can be found at any Home Depot and is relatively cheap. We did this to give us traction for squatting and pulling. Carpeting is the best option for squatting as there is almost no chance of your feet slipping. But it must be thin so as not have too much cushion. I think that we had to replace the carpeting after 6 months of constant use. We also carpeted the area in front of the Power Bench Rack so our feet wouldn’t slip on the plywood. We also had an area in front of the squat rack with carpeting for doing pulls.
    A word of warning: be sure you have a good layout in your gym BEFORE you bolt anything down. You might look into some feng shui for some tips on setting your weight room up.
    Important points:
    • Lay down plywood and screw your equipment down.
    • Use carpeting where you are going to place your feet.
    Handling the Weather
    Living in Kentucky isn’t too bad in the summer or the winter, but it’s not like its Hawaii. For the summertime, you must open up the garage door and you must have a fan. Between sets, I recommend going outside for some extra air; it’s always cooler out there. You must have a lot of water and Gatorade. A few towels to wipe off the sweat from the bench aren’t a bad idea either.
    As bad as the warm weather is, nothing can compare to the winter time. The first thing we did was insulate the garage door. This helped quite a bit. A space heater was also gold. It may take awhile to heat up, but its well worth it. Make sure you dress appropriately and actually do a warm-up.
    Important points:
    • Get a space heater.
    • Get a fan.
    The Training
    So how the hell did we train in here? The most people we could handle at one time were about 4. We’ve had more than that and it became a nightmare. Because we all did the basic 4 day WSB split, there wasn’t a lot of guessing on what we would do on each day.
    At the time, none of us had families, so our scheduling worked out fairly well.
    Bench Press
    The biggest challenge that we had to face when training the bench press was not max effort or dynamic work; it was the assistance work afterward. Because we had limited space and equipment, our assistance work centered on a few key movements.
    Shoulders
    Standing Military Press: This was easy to set up and easy to move through quickly. This was probably the main movements for shoulders.
    Incline Press: All we had was a flat dumbbell bench so we had to raise the end of the bench (using boxes and cinder blocks) to make an incline bench. This wasn’t that big of a deal once we learned the correct combination. Because of space, if someone wanted to do these you could not do military presses or dumbbell bench presses.
    Dumbbell Bench Press/Incline Press: We did have Olympic dumbbell handles but when training in a group of 4 guys, this can be a huge pain in the ass to change the weights. If one of us were going to use the dumbbell handles, only one other guy usually trained with him. As a side note, when using Olympic dumbbell handles for bench pressing or incline pressing do NOT use spring collars. These will kill your legs when you set the dumbbells on them. I highly recommend using some kind of flat, simple collar that doesn’t stick out too far. Also, make sure that it’s very strong and tight. The last thing you want is the plates falling off and tearing your shoulder or smacking your head. This was not a big part of our shoulder training arsenal.
    Triceps
    We did some pin lockouts but stuck to doing 4 and 5 board presses with and without bands. We rarely did extensions. Not because we didn’t have dumbbells but because they didn’t work very well.
    Lats
    We did have a lat pulldown machine but it wasn’t the best and it was a little shaky. For the most part, we did a lot of dumbbell rows, bent over rows and pull ups for our lat work. We also didn’t have a chest supported row machine, which is my favorite lat movement. A couple of times we would incline the dumbbell bench and perform chest supported dumbbell rows on it. This is a great movement and I highly recommend it. Another great way to do pulldowns is to attach two bands to the top of the power rack, sit on the ground and tug away. Our rack was about 7 feet tall, so average bands worked well.
    Upper Back
    For upper back work, we stuck with band face pulls, rear laterals (holding plates, not dumbbells), seated DB cleans (we also held plates when doing these). This wasn’t too much of a challenge.
    Important points:
    • The standing shoulder press, bent over row and pull-up are your friends.
    • Olympic dumbbell handles are great, but can be hard to divvy up amongst friends.
    The Squat/Deadlift
    Dynamic Squat
    The big day for us was Friday. This was the start of the weekend but only after we got done squatting. Because we had only one squat rack and four guys, we all would take a turn squatting. We never had a set order; we went when we felt good. But here is how we did this;
    • One guy squatted, two guys spotted/changed weights, one guy warmed up (this means dynamic flexibility work, glute ham raises, abs, etc.) and helped coach. Everyone was very involved in each other’s workout.
    • The lifter never did anything but lift; he did not change weights, chains or bands.
    • Someone always watched the clock.
    • There was constant coaching and positive and negative feedback.
    • Once you were done, you remained as a coach. You could still do some assistance work during this time.
    • After everyone was done squatting, hamstring, low back and abdominal work was done. If the weather wasn’t bad, we brought the GHR outside to give us more room. 99% of our assistance work involved the GHR, the reverse hyperextension and weighted sit ups.
    • After all training sessions, there was a lot of talking. We bounced ideas off of each other and learned a lot of great information. This is the male version of the beauty salon.
    Max Effort Squat/Deadlift
    Because of the tight quarters, everyone did the same max effort lift. We never mapped anything out, but the majority of our max effort work was:
    • Cambered bar box squats
    • Safety squat bar box squats
    • Cambered bar suspended good mornings
    • Deadlifts off elevated platform
    • Rack deadlifts
    These 5 lifts comprised the majority of our deadlift training. Again, we always had three spotters during the lift for safety and for coaching.
    We also had a dry erase board in the gym that had all of our max effort lifts on it so we always had an accurate record.
    Assistance lifts
    Because we had a reverse hyperextension and a glute ham raise, this made up the majority of our assistance work. We also did a lot of sled work when there wasn’t a ton of ice on the street. There is really nothing that we couldn’t do, outside of machines such as a Power Squat or leg press, in regards to assistance work for the squat and deadlift.
    We were very limited with space, so lunges were certainly not done unless they were done outside.
    Important point:
    • You must work as team.
    How to Win Friends and Not Get Kicked Out
    When we decided to start this gym our initial fear was that we were going to be kicked out because of the loud music and all the noise. So in order to combat this we simply weren’t assholes to people. We helped people move into their apartments numerous times. We also befriended the grounds crew and most of the neighbors that were in the general vicinity of the garage. We also made friends with the crazy guy next door who could weld or bolt anything. We developed good relations with just about everyone so when the music or the noise got too loud we were never “turned in”. Even the loud sled dragging never became an issue.
    Important point:
    • Don’t be an ass and you will be rewarded.
    So if you are looking to start up your own garage gym, here are the most important things you need to know:
    1. Get a space
    2. Use plywood and carpet
    3. Account for the weather
    4. Get the minimum equipment and expand from there
    5. Get reliable training partners
     
  11. fusion210

    fusion210 New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 9, 2001
    Messages:
    160,079
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have the powerline rack, bought from http://www.jesupgym.com/
    They seemed to have the best price shipped. Also they are on ebay.
    It's the perfect rack for me, I'm not lifting much, but only for right now. I could see myself using something a touch more beefy in the future, and I forget who said it, but having the holes spaced 3" apart instead of 2" does get annoying as well.
     
  12. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    I've heard the Yukon GHR is a complete piece of shit
     
  13. JeremyD

    JeremyD New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2004
    Messages:
    5,488
    Likes Received:
    1
    This thread should be stickied!
     
  14. chickenadobo

    chickenadobo New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 10, 2005
    Messages:
    627
    Likes Received:
    0
    uhh u can get a sick elitefts setup for less than $2500 most definitely. check out their package deals.
     
  15. A-NON-A

    A-NON-A New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,682
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Socal
    .
     
  16. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    Orly? I had heard the exact opposite. Blame Memor. He suggested it.

    :mamoru:
     
  17. KingGargantuan

    KingGargantuan ♖♘♗♕♔♗♘♖

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Messages:
    70,967
    Likes Received:
    36
    Location:
    VABeach
    craigslist ftw
     
  18. KingGargantuan

    KingGargantuan ♖♘♗♕♔♗♘♖

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2001
    Messages:
    70,967
    Likes Received:
    36
    Location:
    VABeach
    and pics of what 6'3 210 looks like with your numbers?

    i'm 6'3' 230 and numbers are alot lower than yours
     
  19. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    I told him about it because it looked good and I was gonna get one. I was then informed about the quality
     
  20. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    So noted. It shall be stricken from the record.

    Anyone know a good GHR for a decent price? :hsugh:
     
  21. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
  22. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0

    Yeah,was reading that this morning. Looks like a high level of coordination is required. Extra points for difficulty.
     
  23. kit99bar

    kit99bar USPA Class 2, weak, old man!

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2001
    Messages:
    9,168
    Likes Received:
    11
    awesome ball exercise maine!

    Anyone know where you can find dip bar attachments to a squat rack for cheap? It's a horrible 46 dollars from new york barbells due to shipping costs.
     
  24. Anabolic Pop-Tarts

    Anabolic Pop-Tarts New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2004
    Messages:
    3,410
    Likes Received:
    0
    Well damn, or these:





    Glute Ham Raise - View Exercise
    There are two major style of a Glute Ham Raise; (a) the "natural" style, or with (b) a dedicated machine.
    The "natural" glute ham is no walk in the park and is one of the nastiest of all weight room exercises there is. It will give you a powerful set of hams and a new level of ferocity to your training. This is not a complicated exercise but a brutal one. Make sure you set yourself up with sufficient padding under the knee so that the ankle knee joint is parallel to the ground and toes are dug into the floor with someone holding your feet down.

    [​IMG] ? [​IMG] ? [​IMG] Keep the hips and abs squeezed tight as you pull yourself down with control and do not bend forward. As you invariably collapse to the ground have your hands meet the ground and push off where to the point where you can pull yourself back up using your hamstrings. One particularly devilish approach is to hold statically a few inches from the top for 15-60 seconds and then drop fast eccentrically.
    Hopefully your gym has a dedicated Glute-Ham machine and with the growing popularity of this machine, many are adding them. Set the machine up so the knees are no more than a few inches from the pad with your hips pushed forward. From parallel position, rise up by pushing against the toe-plate and pull with the hamstrings.
    As you get better with exercise you will invariably want to add resistance and one of the best ways to do such is by wearing an Xvest which will distribute the load equally throughout the movement but also not contribute to poor posture as other mediums will.




    :eek3:
     
  25. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2005
    Messages:
    39,645
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    954
    I can't stand those
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page