EDU Request: how to build a computer

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by Skeletor, Feb 4, 2007.

  1. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    I'm considering building a PCI-E computer. I've opened up my comps in the past to upgrade ram and video cards and such, but I'm afraid that I'll be totaly lost when it comes to building one from the ground up.


    Things I know I'll have to get:
    CPU/mobo, RAM modules, sound card, vid card (already have it), ethernet card, and of course a case, dvd/cd player/burner.



    What am I unaware of that I will need? Also I'm wondering how much this should cost (roughly, of course)... I'm guessing 3.0GHZ, 3.0 GB RAM, 150GB HD. I'll of course be checking this out sometime next week if I can make it to Fry's... I don't really need to know that part.

    I'm much more interested in seeing if somebody could make an EDU on how to build a computer and it could be stickied. I think it would be a great addition to the forum and help a lot of curious-but-weary folks like myself. Thanks :wavey: But any advice/feedback on my personal situation would be greatly appreciated of course.
     
  2. Skeletor

    Skeletor Guest

    OK so I got learned a little bit on CPU's and was reccomended a Core2Duo E6600... definitely looks like a good choice after reading up on it.
     
  3. mdaniel

    mdaniel S is for Shiksa

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    That's what I used in my current computer. Its a good chip. It gets a 5.3 on the Vista experience scoring and is actually my lowest subscore. I have 2 GB of PC2-800 memory, 74 GB Raptor boot drive, and a GeForce 7600GT PCIe video card to go with it.
     
  4. peerk

    peerk New Member

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  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    The single most useful piece of advice that I can give you is to match the speeds of the CPU, motherboard, and RAM. For example, if your motherboard has a maximum FSB speed of 1000MHz, you should buy RAM that has a speed of 1000MHz and a CPU that has an external speed of 1000MHz. That way, the CPU and the RAM will be able to communicate as often as possible. Unfortunately, I'm not feeling smart enough to explain why right now, but do it anyway.
     

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