Edmunds - 2006 Heavy Duty Truck Comparison Test

Discussion in 'OT Driven' started by TriShield, Jul 13, 2006.

  1. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Messages:
    132,748
    Likes Received:
    1,611
    Location:
    PRESIDENTIAL TOWER, GREAT AGAIN, NY
    Introduction

    [​IMG]
    We made the contest as even as possible, but when the numbers were crunched the Chevrolet Silverado pulled ahead.

    By Ed Hellwig
    Date posted: 06-06-2006

    Turn on ESPN any weekday afternoon and you can't miss it. Squeezed in between the National Chainsaw Championships and the fourth rerun of SportsCenter, you'll find the World's Strongest Man competition. It pits neckless giants from various Eastern European countries in a contest to see who can pick up boulders the size of big-screen TVs and pull Volkswagens up hills like human John Deeres.

    It's bizarre, pointless and strangely appealing, so much so we decided to conduct our own World's Strongest competition. Rather than scouring the Ukraine for guys who can bench-press BMWs, we used the vehicles themselves as contestants. And not just any vehicles: the biggest, strongest, most abnormally pumped-up pieces of street-legal machinery you can buy without a special license.

    We're talking about heavy-duty trucks, and the bigger the better. There were no rules against foreigners, but it was an all domestic field consisting of the 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 3500, the 2006 Dodge Ram Mega Cab 3500 and the 2006 Ford F-350 Super Duty.

    Like the bald-headed big men on TV, these trucks would be subjected to plenty of heavy lifting. Most of it came in the form of towing a trailer up the steep Jacumba grade near the U.S./Mexico border in Southern California. There would be no cheering crowds and no prize money: only the distinction of being crowned the World's Strongest Pickup. Let the grunting begin.

    Battle of the Big Three

    [​IMG]
    They're as big as pickups get and the best tools for the job when serious towing or hauling is involved.

    Since this was going to be a test of serious hauling capability, all three of our 1-ton trucks were equipped with dual rear wheels and four-wheel drive. An extra set of wheels in back helps stabilize loads when you're towing, while the ability to send power to the front wheels is added insurance when the pavement ends.

    We also specified crew cab body styles and the longest beds possible for maximum passenger and cargo room. The Chevy and Ford trucks were your standard crew cabs, while the Dodge was a super-sized Mega cab. The extra-large Mega Cab adds serious passenger room, but reduces the bed length to 6 feet, 4 inches. Both the Chevrolet and the Ford had full-size 8-foot beds.

    Our final criteria were diesel engines and automatic transmissions. With their massive amounts of torque, diesels are the ticket for heavy-duty hauling, and although all three trucks come standard with manual transmissions, we tested automatics since they're easier to live with on a day-to-day basis.

    Going with diesel power isn't cheap. On the Chevrolet Silverado, the Duramax V8 is part of a $6,705 package which, along with a few other extras, boosted our test truck's price to $48,855. Ordering Ford's Powerstroke V8 and Torqshift automatic for our F-350 tacked on $6,240. It also had the King Ranch appearance package and several stand-alone options that upped the total price to $52,575. Our Dodge Ram Mega Cab came standard with a 5.9-liter Cummins inline-six turbodiesel, but when combined with a long list of additional options, the final price topped out at $55,715.

    Real test for real trucks

    [​IMG]
    Looking like a trio of big rigs at a truck stop, our all-American lineup of heavy-duty trucks proved more than capable when it came to handling heavy loads.

    Although many full-size trucks are used as day-to-day commuter vehicles, these types of trucks are bought primarily for heavy-duty towing and hauling, so we tested them accordingly. This involved calculating each truck's Gross Combined Weight Rating, then loading them up to 81 percent of their maximum before heading for the mountains.

    For weight, Axis Wheels in Santa Fe Springs, California, was kind enough to lend us its 30-foot, three-axle racecar hauler. Usually it carries the company's Super Unlimited 350Z drift car, but we pulled the car out to keep the trailer weight down to just over 8,600 pounds. Any extra weight required was added by stacking retaining-wall blocks in either the beds or the trailer. Since they won't always have a trailer hitched to their backside we also drove each truck empty, as well as testing them at the track and otherwise driving them around town like most pickups.

    More truck than you'll ever need

    [​IMG]

    After putting all three trucks through the ringer for a week, it was clear they're made for work and little else. Without a couple tons of something holding them down, they're miserable on the highway. They also suck down diesel at furious rates, and they're so loud your neighbors will think you're a UPS truck every time you turn the corner.

    Although all three rigs were similarly equipped, each truck had a very different feel on the road. With its living-room-sized cab and well-laid-out controls, the Dodge Mega Cab is the truck to have if your family is bigger than your trailer. High-grade interior trim, a huge center console and the only navigation system in the test made it the most comfortable and convenient vehicle in the test. It has a formidable engine with competitive ratings, but when you go with an automatic it's only a four-speed — a disadvantage against the five- and six-speed transmissions offered by its competitors.

    Between the chrome exterior trim and the Castano brown leather seats, the Ford F-350 looked like the most expensive truck in the test. Too bad the rest of its interior is so dated. It detracts from what many editors considered the most refined package of the three. But this was a test about brute power, so when the Ford lagged up the grade and made a huge racket in the process, the Super Duty lost points.

    That leaves the Chevrolet Silverado, the oldest truck of the three. It hasn't received many styling updates since its introduction in 2001, but the engineers in the powertrain department have been working overtime. Consistent improvements to the Duramax diesel engine, along with the segment's only six-speed automatic transmission, proved hard to beat. It handled heavy loads better and more efficiently than the other trucks and was comfortable along the way. Throw in the fact that it was also the cheapest vehicle of the three, and our choice for the World's Strongest Truck was an easy one.

    Third Place: 2006 Dodge Ram 3500 Mega Cab

    [​IMG]
    Between the fender flares and the massive grille, the Dodge Ram has the look of a serious heavy-duty truck.

    With its ridiculously wide fender flares, huge chrome grille, and a cab the size of a small condo, the Dodge Ram 3500 Mega Cab looks like a prop from a Mad Max movie.

    Yet when it came down to deciding which truck is the baddest thing on six wheels, the Ram rarely topped the list. It wasn't the fastest up the grade or the quickest at the track. The acres of interior space were nice for those in the backseats, but if you're looking to pull a sizable fifth-wheel trailer, the Mega Cab's shorter bed won't work. These are minor shortcomings, but they piled up, and when we factored in its price, the Dodge dropped to last place.

    Loaded with options

    [​IMG]
    Good-quality materials and a functional design make the interior of the Dodge Ram comfortable for a work truck.

    Our Ram 3500 Mega Cab was about as expensive as a Dodge truck, or any truck for that matter, can get. The Cummins turbodiesel engine comes standard on the 3500 Mega Cab, so even without options, the base price is $47,795. With all the extras added to our test truck, the Ram's as-tested price was a staggering $55,715.

    Some of those options were necessary for our test, like the four-speed automatic ($1,095), dual rear wheels ($535) and extendable side mirrors ($100), while the navigation system ($1,595), rear-seat entertainment system ($1,200), sunroof ($895) and UConnect hands-free phone connection ($275) fell into the "nice-to-have" category. Additional add-ons included leather seats ($490), side airbags ($490) and a limited-slip differential ($285).

    Middle-aged

    [​IMG]
    With 325 horsepower and 610 pound-feet of torque, the 5.9-liter Cummins diesel has competitive power ratings, but its four-speed automatic transmission leaves it lagging in the hills.

    Older than the Ford but younger than the Chevrolet, the Ram received a midcycle refresh in 2003. Dodge engineers stiffened the frame, revised the coil-spring/live-axle front suspension and added quicker steering. Although two-wheel-drive models switched to a rack and pinion steering setup, four-wheel-drive models retained a traditional recirculating-ball system. Like every truck in this test, leaf springs support a straight axle in back.

    Improvements to the Ram's 5.9-liter Cummins diesel straight-six in 2003 upped its ratings to 305 horsepower and 555 pound-feet of torque. In 2005, more changes boosted the numbers to 325 hp at 2,900 rpm and 610 lb-ft of torque at 1,600 rpm. A manual transmission was the only gearbox available initially, but a four-speed automatic option was added later.

    Unlike most full-size trucks, the Ram now offers two sizes of crew cabs. It had a standard-size version for years, and then in 2006, Dodge introduced the Mega Cab, an extended crew cab designed to offer more passenger and cargo space than any other truck on the market. It delivers on the promise of interior room, but shortens the exterior cargo bed by 21 inches.

    Half the equation

    [​IMG]
    On the road, the Dodge Ram feels smaller than it is thanks to precise steering and a tight turning radius.

    Its shorter bed means hooking up a fifth-wheel trailer might have clearance issues, but our standard racecar trailer wasn't a problem…at least until we hit the Jacumba grade. Although the Ram's torque rating is higher than the Ford's, with only four gears to work with, it was slower to the top than the F-350 and Silverado. The Ram didn't struggle on the steep sections as much as the Ford, but when it came time to upshift there was a bigger fall-off in power. That drop in power not only slowed the Ram's pace, it reduced its fuel economy to 7 mpg, making it the thirstiest of the three.

    On the plus side, the Ram made the least amount of racket on the way up. Unlike the Ford's nearly constant fan noise, the Ram's cooling fan remained off for most of the trip, engaging for only a few minutes at a time to keep the Dodge cool.

    The lack of an extra gear or two may have hurt the Ram's towing performance, but the transmission worked fine otherwise. You get smooth shifts from gear to gear without any lurching or unexpected downshifts. On the way down, the transmission played dumb and stayed in whichever gear we left it, which wasn't always a bad thing.

    Nice driver

    [​IMG]
    A clean faceplate layout and plenty of accurate, well-separated sound earned the Ram a top score.

    When it wasn't tackling hills, the 3500's transmission was less of an issue. In fact, several editors preferred the Ram's feel on the road to either of its competitors. Its steering is light like the Chevrolet's, but far more precise, and the Ram's 49.7-foot turning radius is 6 feet shorter than the Silverado's. Without the trailer hooked up, you could almost see yourself driving the Ram on a regular basis, it's that comfortable behind the wheel.

    Even without the trailer in tow, the Dodge was the slowest of the three
    . The Ram's 10.1-second run from zero to 60 was nearly 2 seconds slower than the Chevrolet's and a half-second behind the Ford. With tall rear-end gears and an extra 460 pounds of measured curb weight versus the Chevrolet (7,880 vs. 7,420), the Ram surprised no one in its lag against the clock.

    Brake performance was an issue, too, as the Ram needed 149 feet to stop from 60 mph. The Silverado's best stop was 7 feet shorter, the F-350's 14 feet shorter. The four-wheel disc brakes didn't feel underpowered on the road, however, although we did cook them pretty good on the way down the mountain with the trailer in tow.

    Mega interior comfort

    [​IMG]
    Only stretch limousines have more rear passenger room than the Mega Cab.

    Towing performance was the most important factor in this test, but the Ram still managed to score some points with its monstrous interior. And it had more than just loads of space, it had the nicest materials, the most features and the best-sounding stereo. If there was an award for the world's largest center console, it would have won that, too.

    A simple layout with minimal clutter makes the cabin seem that much bigger, and although the seats weren't quite as good as the Silverado's, the seating position was the best of the three. The navigation screen is a little small and we were a little disappointed it couldn't point the way to diesel pumps, but the other trucks don't even offer one, so it's hard to complain too much.

    If backseat passenger room is a priority for you, just buy the Mega Cab and be done with it. There's not only more than enough room to stretch out, there's room left over for extra storage behind the rear seats. It's that big. And when you fold the seats flat it looks more like a spare bedroom than the cab of a pickup truck.

    Strong, but not strong enough

    [​IMG]
    The Mega Cab configuration limits the Dodge to a shorter bed than its competitors.

    A six-speed manual is the standard transmission on a Ram 3500 and we're guessing it would put the Dodge a whole lot closer to the Chevrolet in terms of performance. Ditch the Mega Cab and go with the slightly smaller Club cab and you can get an 8-foot bed, too.

    But this test wasn't about the potential of the Ram, it was about what you get with four full-size doors, an automatic and enough weight on the hitch to make it sweat. Under those conditions, the Ram is good, but the Chevrolet Silverado and Ford F-350 are better.

    Ups: Precise steering, comfortable ride, high-quality interior, unsurpassed passenger room, ample storage space.

    Downs: Four-speed automatic doesn't cut it anymore, shorter Mega Cab bed limits fifth-wheel capability.

    First Impression: If you need passenger room as much as towing power, the Ram Mega Cab is your truck.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $55,715


    Second Place: 2006 Ford F-350 Super Duty

    [​IMG]
    A new grille design was added just last year. Two-tone paint is part of the King Ranch package.

    If the Ford F-350 Super Duty were a contestant in the World's Strongest Man competition, it would be the one with the coolest haircut, cleanest outfit and best interview skills. It would also be the one that finishes a close second after failing to lift a 400-pound boulder over its head.

    You see, after hundreds of miles behind the wheel, most editors considered the F-350 the most refined, well-put-together truck in the test. It feels substantial and solid on the road, but it's not intimidating, thanks to its strong brakes and well-weighted steering. Yet when it came time to climb the Jacumba grade, the Ford lost its cool. It was slower, noisier and less refined than either of its competitors. And in this test, that's what mattered most.

    King of style

    [​IMG]
    A strange mix of old and new materials makes for a odd-looking interior.

    We didn't request it, but our top-of-the-line F-350 Lariat test truck came decked out with the decorative King Ranch package. For an extra $3,185 you get two-tone paint, a power-sliding rear window, lighted side steps and a belt-buckle-sized "King Ranch" badge on the quarter panel. There's also special Castano Brown leather on the seats, steering wheel and center console. It looks tough enough to make a saddle out of it, yet it's so soft the rivets in your jeans leave marks.

    As on the Chevrolet, diesel power is optional ($4,750), as is the five-speed Torqshift automatic transmission ($1,490). Other additions to our F-350 included the Tow Boss package, which adds a factory trailer-brake controller and 4.30 rear-end gears. Stand-alone options consisted of a power sunroof, automatic climate control, all-terrain tires, electronic four-wheel drive, skid plates, premium audio, 2.5-inch trailer hitch and auxiliary upfitter switches.

    What started out as a $38,855 F-350 Lariat crew cab ended up topping out at $52,575. Leave off all the fancy stuff and this truck wouldn't cost anymore than the Silverado, but we tested what Ford gave us.

    New and improved?

    [​IMG]
    With last year's increase in power, the 6.0-liter Powerstroke V8 is now rated at 325 horsepower and 570 pound-feet of torque.

    Although not a complete redesign, the F-350 received a mild refresh in 2005. The designers revamped the grille, while the engineers strengthened the frame and added a coil-spring, monobeam front suspension to four-wheel-drive models. In a first for the segment, a factory trailer-brake system was added to the options list. It synchs up the brakes on the trailer with those on the truck, and it's usually the first thing buyers add through the aftermarket.

    Tweaks to the Powerstroke diesel added another 10 pound-feet of torque. It's now listed at 570 lb-ft at 2,000 rpm and 325 peak horsepower at 3,300 rpm. Taken together, the Ford's improvements combined with its low rear-end gears gave it a GCWR of 26,000 pounds, the highest of the three trucks.

    Not improved enough

    [​IMG]
    Even a full-size crew cab F-350 looks small compared to the 30-foot race car trailer we borrowed from Axis wheels.

    When it came time to show its hand during the hill climb, the Ford didn't fold, but it didn't exactly lay down a full house. It accelerated smoothly and showed no signs of heating up, but it also had the slowest average speed and took the longest to make it to the top. When the grade got tough, the F-350 slowed to 46 mph while the Silverado never dipped below 52 mph. The Ford's struggle was punctuated by a cooling fan that couldn't decide whether to stay on or off.

    Its five-speed automatic shifted every bit as smoothly as the Chevrolet, holding gears when necessary to keep the V8 in the meat of its power band. On the way down, it didn't fare as well, with clunky downshifts that didn't happen as predictably as they did in the Silverado.

    The factory trailer-brake controller worked flawlessly, however, allowing for quick adjustments and smooth integration of the trailer's brake system. We would be surprised if Chevrolet and Dodge don't start offering similar systems soon.

    With an empty bed and no trailer, the F-350's performance was more middle-of-the-road. It beat the Dodge from zero to 60 by half a second (9.6 vs. 10.1) and through the quarter-mile by three-tenths (17.1 vs. 17.4). Its 135-foot stop from 60 was the shortest of the three trucks and our test-driver noted it was the most refined and easy-to-handle truck during panic stops.

    Feels as big as it looks

    [​IMG]
    Lighted step rails seem like unnecessary decoration, but try climbing into the driver seat without them and you'll be glad they are there.

    When you see the F-350's vertical door handles, it's pretty obvious this isn't a truck for running errands around town. Smaller drivers felt like they were scaling K2 every time they got behind the wheel. And unlike the Chevrolet, and to some extent the Dodge, the Ford still feels big when you're behind the wheel.

    It sounds big, too. The few times we squeezed it into a drive-thru we had to shut the engine down just to hear the person squawking on the speaker. Other than its minor inconveniences, the F-350 was a surprisingly comfortable truck to drive. It bounced around less when empty, and once you're up to cruising speed the clatter of the diesel fades into the background. Its steering was slightly heavier than the others, but we liked it anyway as it gave the truck a solid, substantial feel.

    Low-speed maneuverability wasn't as good, as the F-350 had the largest turning circle of the three. Large mirrors help in that regard, and the power-sliding rear window made it easy to communicate with a spotter as we hitched up the trailer.

    Novelty wore thin within

    [​IMG]
    Castano Brown leather is the most conspicuous part of the King Ranch package.

    As slick as the F-350 appeared with its unique leather trim, the novelty wore off quickly. The overstuffed seats weren't as comfortable as they looked and the fake wood trim seems odd when it's thrown in among the truck's average-looking plastic panels. There's not enough usable storage space either, and some drivers found it hard to find a good seating position.

    Passenger room in back is better than the Silverado, both in terms of legroom and shoulder room. Plenty of grab handles and good-sized map pockets on the backs of the front seats were nice touches. It's almost cramped compared to the Dodge, but you could say that about anything short of a Winnebago, so it didn't lose any points. There's also a fold-down utility tray if you flip the seats up, but again it didn't offer as much room as the Dodge.

    Slick, but not strong enough

    [​IMG]
    Nicely integrated wheel housings help give the F-350 its polished look.

    We know there are buyers who will choose the Ford no matter what we say, so for them we'll admit the F-350 is a pretty good work truck. It feels solid, pulls smoothly and looks good doing it. And if you want a vehicle to match your horse stables, the King Ranch package is hard to beat.

    With a little more power, a little less weight and an updated interior, the F-350 would be a front-runner. Until then, it's a truck that looks a little bit better than it tows, and that's only good for 2nd place in this contest.

    Ups: Refined ride, solid steering feel, smooth shifting five-speed automatic, integrated trailer-brake controller.

    Downs: Down on power compared to its competitors, odd mix of old and new in the cabin.

    First Impression: The truck to have if refinement and style matter, but don't be surprised when a Silverado blows past you in the mountains.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $52,575


    First Place: 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 3500

    [​IMG]
    It may not look as fancy as the Ford, but this Chevrolet is the truck to have if heavy-duty hauling is your main priority.

    If style points mattered in this contest, the Chevrolet Silverado wouldn't have had a chance. Its interior is so '90s it might as well come upholstered in flannel, and the dashboard materials are comically cheap for a nearly $50,000 vehicle.

    But this test wasn't about the touchy-feely stuff. It was about which truck makes a 30-foot trailer feel as light as a couple of Jet Skis, and in that respect, nothing could touch the Silverado.

    Older, not weaker

    [​IMG]
    When you have a trailer this big to lug around, nothing is better than the Silverado with Duramax diesel power.

    On sale since 2001, the Silverado 3500 was the oldest truck in this test. It's getting a full redesign sometime next year, but Chevrolet added a significant number of upgrades for 2006. Our test truck was a top-of-the-line LT, so it had all the usual high-end features including a Bose stereo system and 10-way power-adjustable leather seats. Adding the Heavy Duty power package got us the Duramax diesel, along with the Allison six-speed automatic transmission and a locking rear differential.

    When it debuted in 2001, the 6.6-liter Duramax V8 was the most powerful diesel on the market, with 300 horsepower and 520 pound-feet of torque. By late 2003, both the Dodge Cummins straight-six (300, 555) and the Ford Powerstroke V8 (325, 550) had surpassed those numbers.

    In 2005, GM's engineers cranked up the Duramax to 310 hp and 605 lb-ft to keep pace. For 2006, they squeezed it a little more, adding upgrades like a revised turbocharger, higher-pressure fuel system, sturdier block, thicker connecting rods and a more powerful engine computer. The result is 360 hp and 650 lb-ft of torque — and big-time bragging rights.

    As if that wasn't enough, the Allison automatic transmission was upgraded with an extra gear for a total of six. It's another overdrive gear designed for maximum fuel economy on the highway. The first five gears remain the same as before. Also new is an electronic gear-selector switch on the transmission stalk that allows for manual shifting, a feature exclusive to the Silverado.

    Duramax dominance

    [​IMG]
    With 360 horsepower and 650 pound-feet of torque, the 6.6-liter Duramax V8 is the strongest diesel engine you can buy — for this year anyway.

    Big numbers on paper don't always translate directly to the pavement, but in this case the Silverado backed up its spec sheet. At the test track, the 7,420-pound Chevrolet ran from zero to 60 in just 8.4 seconds and crossed the quarter-mile in 16.5 seconds at 83.1 mph. Those numbers not only leave the Ford (9.6, 17.1) and Dodge (10.1, 17.4) sucking diesel smoke, they're in the range of several midsize SUVs we've tested recently.

    Hitching up the big Axis trailer was the real test, however, and the Silverado walked away from the Dodge and Ford there, too. With the trailer in tow and over a ton of bricks in the bed, the Chevrolet maintained the highest average speed up the pass and covered the 12-mile distance nearly a minute faster than both the Dodge and Ford. On the steepest sections of the grade (up to 7.2 percent), the Silverado was the only truck that could maintain constant acceleration. It also delivered the best overall fuel economy for the climb at 7.3 mpg.


    We kept the transmission in tow/haul mode throughout the climb and it worked flawlessly. Every shift was firm and its timing was perfect. With six gears to play with, we thought it might get too busy trying to find just the right ratio, but it didn't jump around any more than the others.

    It was the best transmission on the way down the hill, too. As soon as we touched the brake pedal, it downshifted a gear. And as our speed gradually slowed, it kept on dropping gears, all the way down to 1st by the time we hit the stop sign at the end of the off-ramp.

    Daily driver

    [​IMG]
    It's not much to look at, but the Silverado's cabin functions well.

    Even when we weren't dragging the Axis trailer up a hill, the Chevrolet was a solid driver. Its suspension barely sagged under the weight of the bricks and the ride quality was tight, with minimal sway in crosswinds. Road noise was surprisingly low, and with the engine turning less than 2,000 rpm on the highway, clatter from the diesel engine wasn't intrusive. Its overall mileage while towing on flat terrain was the best of the three as well at 14.1 mpg.

    If there's a weak point, it's the nonexistent steering feel. There's little feedback in a straight line and it's not any better through corners. We weren't expecting precision from a six-year-old truck, but with the trailer out back we would have preferred a little more road feel.

    Modulating the brakes is another problem with the Silverado. For the first few inches the pedal is soft; then it bites in hard and firms up quickly. It turned in the second shortest stop at the track (142 feet), but our test-driver didn't like the way it shuddered during full-lock stops.

    Easy to live with

    [​IMG]
    New manual-shift feature makes choosing the right gear a simple pushbutton operation.

    With the lowest ride height of the three trucks, the Silverado requires less of a climb to get into the driver seat. It doesn't feel massive from behind the wheel either, and the seats have a good range of adjustment. In fact, after several days of nonstop driving nearly every editor found the Chevrolet's front seats the most comfortable of the truck trio.

    It's the exact opposite in the backseats. There isn't much legroom and the seatbacks are too upright. There are decent amenities like rear-seat audio controls and usable cupholders, but the lack of space makes it uncomfortable for adults.

    We've never liked the design of the Silverado's interior, but it makes up for its lack of style with a functional layout and plenty of storage space. There are easy-to-use satellite radio controls on the steering wheel, well-placed cupholders and a solid audio system. You get all the necessary gauges and a comprehensive trip computer, too.

    It doesn't get any stronger

    [​IMG]
    You need a lot more than 2,400 pounds of bricks in the bed to slow this Silverado down.

    If you want a massive cabin or seats that look like saddles, the Silverado isn't your truck. This Chevrolet is about utility first and everything else second. Don't expect to see it towing Volkswagens on ESPN, but rest assured it's the World's Strongest Pickup.

    Ups: As much pulling power as you can get without a commercial driver license, smooth-shifting automatic, push-button shifter, good mileage for its size, comfortable seats.

    Downs: Interior looks and feels dated, cramped rear seats.

    First Impression: If towing and hauling are what you do, a Duramax-equipped Chevrolet Silverado is the best tool for the job.

    MSRP of Test Vehicle: $48,855


    [​IMG]
     
  2. camaudio

    camaudio TALL. WHITE. BAIT. OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    46,832
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    San Diego: Phil's om nom nom
    reading...
     
  3. ZAQ786

    ZAQ786 BMW: The reason Lexus is still 'In the pursuit of

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2000
    Messages:
    33,124
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    HOUSTON, TX
    Ford, please....
     
  4. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Messages:
    132,748
    Likes Received:
    1,611
    Location:
    PRESIDENTIAL TOWER, GREAT AGAIN, NY
    The LBZ Duramax doesn't just rape the competition, it dominates them. I drove an LBZ when it debuted last Fall and it's an amazing powertrain. For being so old the Silverado has aged very well to boot. Very quiet, surprisingly refined. It makes the other two seem like junk.
     
  5. dwarfcat

    dwarfcat COLTS FTMFW

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    36,002
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    teh dirtay filthay southern Indiana
    The somewhat weaker cummins will be attending the funerals of the duramax and powersmoke 10-15 years from now.
     
  6. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Messages:
    132,748
    Likes Received:
    1,611
    Location:
    PRESIDENTIAL TOWER, GREAT AGAIN, NY
    The Cummins uses twice as much fuel to do the same amount of work as the Duramax, and it doesn't perform nearly as well to add insult to injury. :rofl:
     
  7. dwarfcat

    dwarfcat COLTS FTMFW

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    36,002
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    teh dirtay filthay southern Indiana
    god those are some mean looking trucks :drool:
     
  8. dwarfcat

    dwarfcat COLTS FTMFW

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    36,002
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    teh dirtay filthay southern Indiana
    the insult will be multipled when the duramax blows up
     
  9. thomez

    thomez Guest

    werd

    and when uncorked... :eek5:

    best full size trucks = Chevy without question :bowdown:
     
  10. dwarfcat

    dwarfcat COLTS FTMFW

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    36,002
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    teh dirtay filthay southern Indiana
    Why the hell did they test the ram with the 4 speed crapmatic. :hsugh:
     
  11. Lord Denning

    Lord Denning New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 18, 2004
    Messages:
    30,634
    Likes Received:
    0
    i think i would take the ford :o
     
  12. camaudio

    camaudio TALL. WHITE. BAIT. OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    46,832
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    San Diego: Phil's om nom nom
    Nav can be added to the Silvy in 2 mins plug and play for under 1k
     
  13. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Messages:
    132,748
    Likes Received:
    1,611
    Location:
    PRESIDENTIAL TOWER, GREAT AGAIN, NY
    Modded Duramax = "We're not worthy!" power levels :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:
     
  14. thomez

    thomez Guest

    the Cummins will be on its 3rd transmission in 10 years :rofl:

    the Duramax/Allison combo simply rules the class
     
  15. LowkeyG

    LowkeyG OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Messages:
    29,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto
    not a Cummins issue, a tranny issue... one that is being rectified soon
     
  16. SirLumina

    SirLumina New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Messages:
    43,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fucking Hot, CA
    Yeah this is kinda old. Not really surprising considering the output of the Duramax and the highly touted Allison tranny. The next gen one will actually have a decent interior (most likely) and will probably be even stronger and better, though each company is scrambling to meet the diesel emissions standards.
     
  17. Masta Z

    Masta Z FUCK BOSTON

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2004
    Messages:
    45,131
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Long Island, NY
    if they want to complain about the bed so much then use the damn quad cab with 8 foot bed, jesus

    and we all know the 4 speed auto is garbage
     
  18. camaudio

    camaudio TALL. WHITE. BAIT. OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2004
    Messages:
    46,832
    Likes Received:
    23
    Location:
    San Diego: Phil's om nom nom
    i cant wait for the new silverados to come out with the updated interior/exterior to match the awesome power train
     
  19. TriShield

    TriShield Super Moderator® Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2001
    Messages:
    132,748
    Likes Received:
    1,611
    Location:
    PRESIDENTIAL TOWER, GREAT AGAIN, NY
    And it has quite a few features the other, newer trucks still lack. Like automatic dual-zone climate control. GM really knew what they were doing when they engineered this beast years ago.
     
  20. LowkeyG

    LowkeyG OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Messages:
    29,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto
    Obviously you guys know my choice, but in reality, I would happily drive any of those three
     
  21. SirLumina

    SirLumina New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2003
    Messages:
    43,074
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Fucking Hot, CA
    Because they were all autos and Dodge only offers a 4 speed crapmatic auto. :hsugh:
     
  22. dwarfcat

    dwarfcat COLTS FTMFW

    Joined:
    Jan 17, 2005
    Messages:
    36,002
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    teh dirtay filthay southern Indiana
    well the widowed cummins engine and the widowed allison transmission can hook up at the duramaxs funeral and live happily ever after
     
  23. Throwdest

    Throwdest Guest

    [​IMG]


    give me a god damn break :ugh:


    Ford > GM&Dodge
     
  24. LowkeyG

    LowkeyG OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2002
    Messages:
    29,188
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Toronto
    :werd: that is pretty stupid
     
  25. thomez

    thomez Guest

    no kidding :bowdown: :bowdown: :bowdown:
     

Share This Page