Early morning workout advice needed...

Discussion in 'Fitness & Nutrition' started by Mammoth, Oct 11, 2007.

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  1. Mammoth

    Mammoth OT Supporter

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    I have decided to start working out in the early morning. I will be doing cardio (bike riding) and lifting free weights. I was hoping you guys could give me some tips. Not on exercises, but more on a morning routine. Specifically, should I eat breakfast before or after the workout? If I'm to eat it beforehand, how long should I wait before working out? Should I take any supplements to help my morning routine?

    The reason I'm switching my workouts to the morning is because my wife & I had a baby 6 months ago. Since then, I haven't been able to workout in the evenings like I used to. Between work, picking the child up from daycare, feeding her, and playing with her, I don't have time to workout in the evenings any longer. So in order to continue working out, I decided to move my workouts to first thing in the morning.

    Any tips you can give me about morning workouts would be great. Thanks.
     
  2. AKing

    AKing It's like we've got each others backs

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    I actually i was going to post a similar topic today. Save me the trouble on that. What are the diffrences between Morning and evenings. I know the body is out of carbohydrates to do almost any form of lifting but is there any to boost your energy?
     
  3. MaineSucks

    MaineSucks OT Supporter

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    for morning, I'd suggest getting something in your system first. Get some protein and a carb source, even if its something quick like 2 scoops of whey and some whole grain bread.

    Sip a BCAA solution during the workout and eat afterwards. Make sure you are awake though... I've read some things that you shouldn't do much within the first hour you are awake (in terms of exercise)... something about some fluid in the spine and long term shit. Don't remember exactly, but it was in T-Nation, so take it for what its worth.
     
  4. Jeebus

    Jeebus Well-Known Member

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    The only thing that really works well for me when it comes to morning lifting is to eat something fairly light. I eat usually 2 pieces of toast, and a boawl of oatmeal with some whey stirred in.
     
  5. brapbrap

    brapbrap New Member

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    From Tom Venuto's Burn the Fat, Feed the Muscle:




    Early morning fasted cardio: A simple method to increase the fat burning effects of
    your cardio by up to 300%


    Any time of day that suits your schedule is a good time for cardio. The important
    thing is that you just do it. However, many bodybuilders and fitness models believe that
    early morning fasted cardio burns more body fat. Although this is still controversial, the
    evidence is strong and there are many reasons to consider doing cardio first thing in the
    morning on an empty stomach. The argument in favor of fasted early morning cardio goes
    something like this:

    1. After an overnight 8-12 hour fast, your body's stores of glycogen are depleted and you
    burn more fat when glycogen is low.

    2. Eating causes a release of insulin. Insulin interferes with the mobilization of body fat.
    Less insulin is present in the morning; so more body fat is burned when cardio is done in
    the morning.

    3. There is less carbohydrate (glucose) in the bloodstream when you wake up after an
    overnight fast. With less glucose available, you burn more fat.

    4. If you eat immediately before a workout, you have to burn off what you just ate first
    before tapping into stored body fat (and insulin is elevated after a meal.)

    5. When you do cardio in the morning, your metabolism stays elevated for a period of
    time after the workout is over. If you do cardio in the evening, you burn calories during
    the session, but you fail to take advantage of the "afterburn" effect because your
    metabolic rate drops dramatically as soon as you go to sleep.

    6. Morning cardio gives you a feeling of accomplishment and makes you feel great all day
    by releasing mood-enhancing endorphins.

    7. Morning cardio "energizes" you and "wakes you up."

    8. Morning cardio may help regulate your appetite for the rest of the day.

    9. Your body’s circadian rhythm adjusts to your morning routine, making it easier to
    wake up at the same time every day.

    10. You’ll be less likely to "blow off" your workout when it’s out of the way early (like
    when you’re exhausted after work or when friends ask you to join them at the pub for
    happy hour).

    11. You can always "make time" for exercise by setting your alarm earlier in the morning.

    A common concern about doing cardio in the fasted state, especially if it’s done
    with high intensity, is the possibility of losing muscle. After an overnight fast, glycogen,
    blood glucose and insulin are all low. This is an optimum environment for burning fat.
    Unfortunately, it may also be an optimum environment for burning muscle because
    carbohydrate fuel sources are low and levels of the catabolic stress hormone cortisol are
    high. It sounds like morning cardio might be a double-edged sword, but there are ways to
    avert muscle loss.

    All aerobic exercise will have some effect on building muscle, but as long as you
    don’t overdo it, you shouldn’t worry about losing muscle. It's a fact that muscle proteins
    are broken down and used for energy during aerobic exercise. But you are constantly
    breaking down and re-building muscle tissue anyway. This process is called "protein
    turnover" and it’s a daily fact of life. Your goal is to tip the scales slightly in favor of
    increasing the anabolic side and reducing the catabolic side with nutrition just enough so
    you stay anabolic and you maintain muscle.
     
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