DVD Burners - external or internal?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by j1o, Aug 4, 2005.

  1. j1o

    j1o snatch snatcher

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    I'm looking for a dvd burner and would prefer one with USB 2.0 connectivity so i can use it with my laptop if needed, as well as my desktop (not to mention i can take it with me anywhere else i would want to use it).

    But my question is, do internal DVD burners have any benefits over external ones? More or less features, speed, etc? Any recommendations?

    Also, do all burners also act as a regular cd/dvd drive so that i can play movies and music, in addtion to ebing able to burn copies?

    Thanks!
     
  2. mace

    mace i don't read

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    I think ide is faster than usb 2.0, but there shouldn't be any noticible differences. the only advantage i can think of is the portability.

    depending on what dvd burner you get, it should be able to play and burn dvd's and cd's. so yes, you can watch dvd's and listen to music cd's.
     
  3. NPH

    NPH Guest

    go for the internal SATA burners :naughty:
     
  4. DAN513

    DAN513 OT Supporter

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    You can always buy a good internal dvd burner and a decent external case.
     
  5. R-Type

    R-Type The Bydo Empire must die!

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    The drive itself is the speed bottleneck. Changing transfer busses would make no difference in time-to-completion-of-burn assuming the drive mechanics, electronics, and firmware is the same between the internal and external model. If you buy external, you're just paying an extra ~$100-$150 for a plastic box, power supply, and data connectors/cables. The only advantage is that you can easily move it from machine to machine.

    Another thing to keep in mind is performance while the system is under heavy load. While this can depend on how good the hardware and drivers are on the motherboard, generally, SCSI would be your most reliable (And most expensive) bet, then SATA, then old school PATA and USB/1394a et al.
     
    Last edited: Aug 4, 2005

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