A&P dSLR Crew... Lets talk about filters :eek3:

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by TurkeyChicken, Apr 27, 2006.

  1. TurkeyChicken

    TurkeyChicken New Member

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    So I just got my Nikon D50 yesterday and people have been talking alot about filters.

    Can you guys explain what filters should go with what environments and maybe give links to the ones you have?

    When I bought an older camera, I got some "kit" that came with a UV and Polarizer that fit on my d50, but I'm not sure if they actually do anything... at least I couldn't tell on my older camera.

    Thanks :x:
     
  2. Shiva Chaos

    Shiva Chaos i see boobies!

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    always have UV filter on a lens. farther down the road you might want to get a polarizer.

    i only use a UV filter the majority of the time.
     
  3. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    get a circular polarizer and I like to have a ND filter handy also.
     
  4. TurkeyChicken

    TurkeyChicken New Member

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    links to the ones you have?

    and what does an ND filter do?
     
  5. natelam

    natelam New Member

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    I never use UV filters as most lenses nowadays are multicoated. I keep hoods on all the time for protection.

    Some general rules:
    1. Circular polarizers (CPL) is used to cut out certain wavelengths of light, and allows you to rotate the filter to achieve the effect you want. You can cut out reflections from windows, water, or just darken up the sky by cutting out refractile light. You'll see linear polarizers on the market, but these are not for most AF lenses although you can make them work if you really want to.

    2. Neutral Density Filters (ND) darken your exposure a certain number of stops allowing you to use slower shutter speeds depending on the number (ND3, ND5, ND7, ND9) you might use this when you are in a well lit area, but want the effects of motion blur (i.e. water falls). There are also graduated neutral density filters which rotate to allow you to choose how many stops.

    3. Colored filters - basically adds or subtracts certain colors. If you have a green filter on, it's going to enhance green color, and subtract some red color from the image. Alternatively, some colored filters are designed to change the entire white balance of the image - used to have to use them with film a lot. A minor bit of color is usualyl added (pink) to UV warming filters. Another common use for these is landscapes-there are plenty of variations on colored filters to suit your needs but my favorite is a Singh-Ray Blue-Gold Polarizer - my go to filter for open scene landscapes - makes the sky bluer, and brightens up the scene with nice contrast.

    4. "Utility" filters - these include UV/Clear/a/b/Haze filters
    They generally don't do a whole lot especially if you have a multi-coaded lens like a Nikon ED or comparable. They might cut out of a bit of UV light which degrades a little bit of image quality, or if they have warming elements it might enhance your colors...I personally don't see a need for them and am happy with my images. Some people keep them on all the time because they've read they should or for protection - your perogative.

    5. There is a cluster of specialty filters
    that you may or not even care about. Star filters, B+W filters, Closeup, Infrared, etc...I'm sure you can google these if you want more info.

    Hope that helped.

    Edit: saw you wanted to know which filters we have. My regular kit consists of:

    1. 77mm B+W Kaesemann CPL
    2. 77mm B+W ND6, 9 Multicoated
    3. 77mm B+W Graduated Blue 581
    4. 77mm Singh-Ray Blue-N-Gold Polarizer
    5. 77mm Canon 500D Close up Filter
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2006
  6. TurkeyChicken

    TurkeyChicken New Member

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    Awesome, thanks for the info.

    so for now, should I be fine without any filters, and then once I get a little more experience start looking at them?
     
  7. IntheWorks

    IntheWorks windin film.. takin pics Moderator

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    what subjects to do you plan on shooting?
     
  8. TurkeyChicken

    TurkeyChicken New Member

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    Mostly outdoor stuff. I really just bought the camera to learn how to use a dSLR... I'm a pretty big n00b at this.

    There's a bog about a mile from my house that I always see photographers at taking pictures of ducks and stuff. I'll probably go there and take a bunch of shots.

    Other than that, there isn't a whole lot to take pictures of in the middle of Indiana :o
     
  9. sony

    sony Active Member

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    actually it only allows a certain orientation of wavelength to pass through, that's how it can cut reflections (i.e. up/down up down)
     
  10. Jcolman

    Jcolman OT Supporter

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    Wrong. Graduated neutral density filters are used when you want to darken a portion of the scene (usually the sky) while leaving the rest of the scene unchanged. Graduated filters come in various strengths and you can also get them in graduated ND and color combination like "sunset". I use Graduated ND filters on most of my exterior shots.

    The rest of your information is pretty accurate however.
     
  11. mandarin orange

    mandarin orange OT Supporter

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    UV and CPL should be fine if you're a beginner. I use a UV filer on all of my lenses. they dont do much but they protect the lens (that's why most people buy 'em).. i'd rather scratch a UV filter than my lens.
     
  12. tenplanescrashing

    tenplanescrashing Active Member

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    same here, and again, this can vary between each photographer. some like them, some don't.

    CPL are great, especially when you're dealing with water reflections or dry looking skies.

    when you understand your camera more, you could look into infrared filters and tobacco filters. they can be quite fun for certain shoots. like any glass, don't cheap out on the filter. I prefer Tiffen but there are others. Stay away from quantaray filters, i've learned that the hard way!
     
  13. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    and the automotive fanatics. CPL can cut 3-4 stops (seems more like 1 or 2). Shooting outdoor car shows, the CPL stays on until the sun starts setting. It does a great job in reducing the amount of glare and also helps reduce the harsh light, slightly.
     
  14. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    i really need to get a CPL before this weekend. i am shooting some exotics and i do not know if they are going to indoors or if he will roll them out for the group.
     
  15. Derrict

    Derrict No, I am not Amish OT Supporter

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    I tried to find some examples with and w/o the CPL, this was the best I could do. #1 has the CPL, #2 doesn't. In #2 you can see how much harsher reflections off the paint is.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    For the original poster, I'm using 77mm B+W UV MRC and B+W CPL, Tiffen 67mm CPL and UV MRC.
     
  16. SL1200MK4

    SL1200MK4 New Member

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    Depends on the lens, 77mm B+W UV for my 70-200 VR and Sigma 10-20. Nothing for my 18-70.
     
  17. Kinks

    Kinks Sup. OT Supporter

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    If you're worried about the front of your lens get a multicoated UV filter off ebay. the multicoating means the filter won't add much ghosting/flaring compared with not having it. a cheap filter will definitely flare.

    Personally I'd rather be scrubbing salt spray off a filter than the front of my lens. If the filter gets scratched or the coating rubbed off I can just chuck it and get a new one for a few bucks. I did, however, take the filter off when I shot my sister's wedding. I knew I wouldn't be getting the lens dirty and the pictures would be a tad better without it.
     
  18. Blair

    Blair New Member

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    Derrict:

    thanks for posting those comparisons. i really like how the CPL cuts down on paint glare. i think it really lets you see the lines of the car; not light going a million different ways.
     
  19. Dongsy Normus

    Dongsy Normus fag

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    the comparison's great that exactly what happens to alot of P+S shots i used to take, theyre just washed out
     
  20. natelam

    natelam New Member

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    I didn't say that was the purpose of a grad ND filter, I said there ARE grad ND filters that allow you to rotate them to select stops and angle. 2-ring mount - one ring rotates the horizon and the other ring selects the density. They are similar to putting a graduated linear polarizer on a lens - rotating it will change the density. They aren't all that common though compared to the regular Split NDs.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2006

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