GUN Drawing from concealment

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by JaimeZX, Jan 26, 2008.

  1. JaimeZX

    JaimeZX Formerly of :Sep 2001: fame - Also: Sprout Crew OT Supporter

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    Relevant to my other thread about Mr. E:

    I practiced drawing last night for a while.
    Obviously it's winter and I usually wear a jacket when I'm out. Being a lefty, I wear an IWB holster at about 8 o'clock.

    If the jacket is unzipped, drawing is fairly easy.
    However if the jacket is zipped it seems much more difficult. Sort of a lift-jacket-then-slide-hand-under-jacket-and-grab-weapon-hoping-it-doesn't-snag-on-jacket maneuver.
    Ackward.

    Any TTPs here? :hs:
     
  2. AB13

    AB13 New Member

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    One of the things you want to concentrate on when practicing reloading from concealment is to get a good grab, not so tight that you can adjust your grip as you bring the gun up to get a sight picture. Practice where the back of the gun should contact your hand.

    I'll share how I learned to draw. When I draw, it's two movements, my right hand sweeping my garment to grab for the gun at the same time my left hand goes to about mid chest, wait for the gun. I have my left thumb pointing up, and my four fingers parallel with the ground.

    As I'm drawing, I'm stuffing my thumb behind the left side of the gun with my strong hand, and as I bring the gun up it's almost in a straight up pattern till it gets mid chest, as it nears my mid body my left hand is going to meet the gun, I bury my first two fingers in the junction where my strong hand and under the trigger guard meets and I roll the rest of my "support hand" into place and locking my left wrist forward as it meets the gun. The movement of the gun from draw almost is 90 degrees like an upside down L. Hard to explain. But then you are pushing the gun out and forward to your sight picture.

    I then begin pushing the gun forward to where I practice the gun to be at to gain my sight picture. and my left hand is now sweeping the thumb safety and my trigger finger begins to cover the front of the trigger.

    Nothing else from my body moves, just my arms. I don't duck to meet the sights, rahter my arms brings the gun up to meet between where my eyes are set on the target. BRING THE GUN to meet your sight picture, and don't duck for it.

    Here's my advise. To learn to draw fast, you must practice slow.
    Do every thing slowly taking into consideration everything your arms and hands are doing. Eliminate any wasted movement. think ECONOMY IN MOTION. Do not waste any of your movement except for this. Dont' bounce, and remain level.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2008
  3. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

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    Tactical Response taught:

    1. Verbalize... yell "STOP" or some other non-profane command, to reset bad guy's OODA. As you begin the rest of step one, MOVE out of the line of attack. Grab cover garment with BOTH hands and lift to armpit with both hands, then strong hand goes back down to pistol and gets fighting grip. Weak hand stays on your pec and holds cover garment there.

    2. Draw and rotate pistol up to retention position.

    3. Bring weak hand on to pistol as you "punch" the pistol away from you, acquiring front sight as you punch.

    Edited to show the process exactly as it was done in the class.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2008
  4. JaimeZX

    JaimeZX Formerly of :Sep 2001: fame - Also: Sprout Crew OT Supporter

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    Interesting, both of you.

    Frequently if I'm going to Wal-Mart or something I'll wear an undershirt or t-shirt against my skin and have the weapon outside of that, then just have the coat over the weapon. In that case, AB's method seems more logical.

    If, however, I'm wearing a shirt over the gun (or my jacket is zipped,) then Clingman's method seems more reasonable. I suppose I ought to practice with both? Seems silly to lift-to-my-pec an easily brushed-aside coat. Slower, at least. :hs:
     
  5. Clingman

    Clingman Clingman runs Bartertown.

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    Hopefully Shacklemenot will come in here and provide some more guidance.

    I am far more comfortable with the two-handed technique because you always have control of the garment and grabbing the garment with both hands is more of a gross skill. I'd rather be a little slower and know that my hands/gun have no chance of coming up wrapped in the cover garment :dunno:
     
  6. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot MINDSET

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    Safety first: Always be aware of your muzzle orientation and keep your finger off the trigger and high on the pistol's frame until your gun is on target and you've made the decision to shoot.

    A correct draw is more important than a fast draw. A fast, correct draw is obviously best. It's better to be sure than to fumble your pistol or get caught in your cover garment.

    It doesn't matter if you have an open front jacket or a closed front. I do both the same way.

    1. Move off the line of attack, verbalize and grab the cover garment with both hands and pull it up high. Dominant hand establishes a fighting grip on the pistol while your non-dominant hand remains high on the chest holding the cover garment tight and out of the way.

    2. Draw the gun up to a high indexed retention position. You can now begin to release the cover garment as you are clear of it.

    3. The pistol and support hand meet at the center of the chest, establish a proper two handed grip and push to the level of extension available or necessary to make your shots.

    Reholster in the opposite order but you'll need to clear your cover garment with your non-dominant hand and bring it back up high on your chest after coming to position two in the draw.

    I hope this brief explanation helps.
     
  7. ShackleMeNot

    ShackleMeNot MINDSET

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    There are plenty of gun owners out there that practice the wrong thing over and over. Shitty gun handling. Shitty draw stroke. Shitty marksmanship. Developing bad habits or techniques and then ingraining them is certainly not helpful for defense.

    This is one of the main reasons I advocate taking a good class from a competent instructor. If you are going to practice something, make it a good something.
     
  8. JaimeZX

    JaimeZX Formerly of :Sep 2001: fame - Also: Sprout Crew OT Supporter

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    :werd: Trying to learn.

    Still planning on going to the Fighting Pistol class in June if I'm not deployed. :)
     
  9. kellyclan

    kellyclan She only loves you when she's drunk.

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    I do it like mostly Shack said, I grab with the weak hand and pull my clothing up off the gun. I feed my right hand up from about belt high to grip the weapon and ensure it doesn't get displaced by the garment. Your shirt and coat will be all tweeked up, you won't look cool, and your nips might get cold, but your gun is ready and that's the goal.

    Practice in front of a mirror so you can see where your hands, clothes, etc are and what you're doing. Do it SLOWLY all the time, only adding speed as you gain comfort with the movement and even then, always go back to practicing slowly. It's like kung fu, you want your form to be perfect, smooth and efficient. Slow is smooth, smooth is fast.

    And from someone who has had to take the time to break bad habits that crop up under more stressful practice, do what Shack says again, and incorporate verbal commands and movement into your draw stroke. If you don't do it all the time in training, you won't do it when you really need to. Drawing a gun in a fight is a non-shooting action. If you're not actively shooting, you should be moving, reloading, communicating, etc.
     
  10. footratfunkface

    footratfunkface New Member

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    I basically do what Shay said, except for using the weak hand to pull the cover garment up. I had never really considered it. I just hook my strong hand thumb underneath everything and lift it around the pistol as I take my fighting grip. I'll definitely try using the off-hand.
     

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