does wireless g have better range than wireless b?

Discussion in 'OT Technology' started by MattThom01, May 15, 2006.

  1. MattThom01

    MattThom01 New Member

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    I'm currently splitting the DSL connection here with an old Linksys wireless b router...the DSL is connected to the router, and is wired to the computer in the same room. My brother and i are going to use wireless for our internet because we have computers in rooms that are in our basement. The router we are using is wireless b, and I just upgraded the firmware for it today. I'm using a wireless g desktop card for my computer, and it says my signal strength varies between low and very low. The site survey thing says the card is picking up the router's signal at 54%.

    Here's my question. Will upgrading the router to a wireless g increase signal strength down in the basement at all? Or do the 2 standards have the same range? I know they have different speeds, but for DSL, it's a moot point.
     
  2. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    g does have more range. it uses a different modulation and range is better.

    but I'm not sure if changing the router is going to help. Exactly what is wrong? Is it just that the utility says "low" or do you lose connection? Having the utility go from "low" to "good" probably won't give you any increase in speed.....exactly what's wrong?
     
  3. rsxm5

    rsxm5 OT Supporter

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    I have both a G access point and a B access point, and I get about the same amount of distance on either one.
     
  4. MattThom01

    MattThom01 New Member

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    Ok, thanks guys...there isn't really any problem..I moved my tower so now I get a consistent "Low" on the signal strength thing. I guess I was thinking that having a better signal might affect speed or something like that, but if it doesn't really, I'll just stick with what I have.

    Thanks again!
     
  5. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Buy a set of high-gain WiFi antennas from RadioShack. They double the volume of the wireless transmitters and the sensitivity of the wireless recievers. Regardles of what other solutions you come up with, high-gain antennas will make the signal even better.
     
  6. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    if you're not dropping connection then getting a better/stronger signal isn't worth doing anything suggested in this thread.
     
  7. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    Of course a stronger signal will make a difference. Is it easier to see/hear/smell anything when it's closer or when it's farther away? Sure, radio waves aren't an exact comparison (except to sight), but even a digital signal gets muddy when it transmits through walls, resulting in dropped packets even if the "signal" doesn't get dropped.
     
  8. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    Unless the link is being downgraded to accommodate the low signal. b/g routers will auto-negotiate down in order to keep the connection up if the S/N ratio gets too low.
     
  9. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    even downgraded it's still faster than his cable/dsl can go

    transfering files behind the router will be slower, but internet won't be noticeably affected
     
  10. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    That depends on how downgraded the signal is. If it drops below 2Mbps (and I've seen mine do that with two un-insulated walls in the way), then he'll be losing bandwidth. Furthermore, if they ever play games over their wireless network (regardless of the high ping), they'll want all the bandwidth they can get. Radioshack's high-gain antennas really don't cost that much.
     
  11. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    G's lowest datarate is 6Mbps so if he's bumped down to 2 or 1 then he's been knocked back to B, back in the same situation he's in now.

    B and G use different modulation, and G's modulation (OFDM in case you were wondering) penetrates walls better, but none of this matters for what he's asking. If he's not dropping his connection then he's fine...but hey, go spend $40 on new antennas...why not?
     
  12. deusexaethera

    deusexaethera OT Supporter

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    If they weren't worth the money (in my personal experience), I wouldn't have recommended them. Like I said before, they'll make any existing setup more reliable.
     
  13. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    and like I said before, he's not having an issue with reliability so it's money wasted.
     
  14. Peyomp

    Peyomp New Member

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    B actually ranges better in terms of signal degredation. But it starts at 10 or so megabit/sec, so even though G loses signal strength quicker as you move away from the antennae, the actual throughput is higher at a longer range. As per a /. article a couple years ago.
     
  15. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    Wow, I actually agree with you :o

    G is going to net you a farther USUABLE range.
     
  16. MattThom01

    MattThom01 New Member

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    So it might be worth using Best Buy's 30 day tryout period and seeing if a G router makes any difference...if not, I'll just return it.
     
  17. P07r0457

    P07r0457 New Member

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    if range is your concern, get one of the MIMO routers.
     
  18. Jas0n

    Jas0n Антихрист

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    Something else you should know. The wireless signal, like heat, tends to radiate upwards. Get your wireless router as low as you can, and get your antenna as high as you can. If your router is upstairs somewhere, you'll be doing yourself a huge favor to move it to the basement, if you can. And any way you can get your antenna (what kind are you using? USB adapter?) higher up, should help you get a somewhat stronger signal.

    At least... this is what I've been told, by some guy at Linksys I think. I'm downstairs from the router as well, and moving my antenna up three or four feet definitely made a difference in the strength of my signal. Just a thought.
     
  19. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    No, it radiates exactly in the direction that the antenna sends it. For the dipole rubber ducks that come on these consumer access points that means a slightly flattened sphere that's wider than it is tall (if you're viewing the antenna pointed straight up). That's why people are suggesting laying the antennas down...to try to get the flatter part of the sphere to point down.
    How is he going to move his AP down but his antenna up?
    3' can make a huge difference. There might be a heating duct in the wall/ceiling/floor that's blocking some signal or causing interference.
     
  20. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    Can't hurt...but if you're going to do that, find one online for cheap then buy that same model from BB. If it works, buy it online for less and return it to BB for the full refund.
     
  21. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    exactly what are you upload/download transfer speeds?
     
  22. 7960

    7960 New Member

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    Seeing as the actual throughput of a wireless radio is about 50% of the advertised speed, *any* B radio would reduce your transfers. I'm guessing most people don't have anything over 500/1500 up/down.
     
  23. MattThom01

    MattThom01 New Member

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    Guys...I'm not really worried about transfer speed. We have really basic DSL here, top download rate is like 36 k/second. I was just wondering if the signal strength received made any difference as long as I wasn't having dropouts and such.
     
  24. EvilSS

    EvilSS New Member

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    You also have to look at if the low signal is causing dropped packets and retransmits.
     
  25. MattThom01

    MattThom01 New Member

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    Eh, I'm in a small town in Iowa, out in the country, and the phone company just recently set up DSL here. Still better than dial up, and at least we can all be online at once now at home.
     

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