GUN Does anyone have experience with a Springfield Mil-Spec 1911?

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by 4bangin, Feb 11, 2010.

  1. 4bangin

    4bangin Ballet of Violence

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    How do you like it? There is a good deal on one locally, but it has a high round count. Does this really matter as long as it was taken care of? Is there anything I should look into replacing that might wear out after a lot of rounds?

    tia
     
  2. mephistopholes

    mephistopholes New Member

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    I have one. It's a good 1911 for the money and is recommended by many smiths as a good base gun for a custom. Mine has had some issues with the fit of the gun (plunger tube is a bit loose and I replaced the rear sight when the factory sight was found to be too loose a fit in the dovetail). Upside is that it has run %100 without any malfunctions since I took it out of the box. For someone looking for an inexpensive route into a basic 1911, it's the first one I'd look to.

    For a gun with a high round count, I'd expect the price to reflect that. I'm not an expert on 1911's, but if I were checking out a used one I would look at replacing the recoil spring and making sure the extractor tension was good. Also check the fit of the plunger tube and ejector to make sure they are solid.

    The other thing to watch out for is if the gun has been modified from stock. It's not necessarily a bad thing for a gun to have been customized but it is important to know that the work was done by an experienced smith and not some guy at his kitchen table.
     
  3. sp00n155

    sp00n155 You underestimate the insignificance of my penis OT Supporter

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    Check the frame rail area on both sides for signs of excessive wear or cracks. (the edges should be 90 degree angles and not rounded off, at all) if thats good to go, pick it up.

    if the sights are not dovetailed and you are not happy with the factory sights understand it is a costly or extremely time consuming effort to change them.

    also keep in mind these are extremely common and you can EASILY find a used one in great shape for ~500$


    I picked up mine for 475$ barely used locally.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Reverend

    Reverend OT Supporter

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    I have one in .38 Super, and I love it. I've got thousands of rounds through it.
     
  5. phoenixTX

    phoenixTX New Member

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    You might want to confirm if it's a "G.I" or a "Mil-Spec" (formerly listed in their catalog as the "G.I. Mil-Spec", hence the confusion). I've found a lot of SA G.I. models for sale and the owner will call it a Mil-Spec when it's not. There is a minor price difference ($50-75) when new, but the differences in the gun are worth it.

    A Mil-Spec will have a polished ramp and throated barrel (from the factory), a lowered and flared ejection port, and much better 3-dot sights with a removable front sight. The biggest external difference is the angled serrations on slide. The G.I. grips actually say 'US' while the Mil-Spec grips are the SA crossed cannons, but I don't usually go by those because they are commonly changed out. Spoon155's 1911 pictured above is a G.I. model, but not a Mil-Spec.
     
  6. Reverend

    Reverend OT Supporter

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    The grips can also be bare, depending on the manufacturing date.

    here's my SA mil-spec .38 Super 1911

    [​IMG]
     

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