A&P Does anyone have a good source of info about metering?

Discussion in 'Lifestyle' started by hootpie, Jun 4, 2009.

  1. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    I searched the forum, but couldn't really find anything.

    I want to know all about the different metering modes on my camera (40D) and examples of when it's appropriate to use each one.
     
  2. isaac86hatch

    isaac86hatch This thread sucks

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  3. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    I see what you did there.

    I'm looking for something more in-depth.
     
  4. derekOT

    derekOT New Member

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    search OTAP for the "40D field guide"

    there is a .pdf book you can download from that thread
     
  5. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    Others can give you a link for those settings, but the 1st thing to learn about metering is how it works.

    There are 2 ways to meter, reflective and incident. incident is measuring the light falling on the subject, and the most accurate. Hand held meters are incident meters. You have to meter from the subjects position.

    Reflective is what the camera uses, same with spot meters. This is measuring the light reflecting off the subject. With this approach, the camera thinks your subject is middle gray or a midtone in the B&W scale.
    White with no detail - white with detail - light gray - middle gray - dark gray - black with detail - black with no detail.

    So if your subject isn't a middle tone, for example a bride in her wedding dress, your meter is going to give you an inaccurate reading. Knowing the above scale, and that there is 1 stop between each "level", you would know that the camera is under exposing by 2 stops on her dress. You can either set the proper exposure in Manual mode, or adjust the "EC - exposure compensation" for +2 stops
     
  6. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    Thanks for the info.

    So when taking a picture of a bride in a white dress does it not matter what metering mode you use? Or should you use spot metering and lock the exposure on her dress, then recompose and take the pic?
     
  7. asdfbunk

    asdfbunk A Member OT Supporter

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    You do not want to expose on her dress, that will give you an underexposed shot.

    Sometimes for difficult scenes some people will tell you to expose on an 18% grey card and recompose the shot afterwards.
     
  8. mojito

    mojito New Member

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    well it depends. How much of the frame the dress is taking up, what else is in the room etc. If she's small in the frame and lots of say, blue sky, the if you have it set to anything but spot you'd be fine

    but if its a white room with the white dress, you're f'ed anyway you try, unless its a closeup of the face


    btw, other midtones you can cheat from are: human skin, GREEN grass, the darkest part of a blue sky. so if you aren't sure how much to compensate, you can meter from one of those, assuming its lit the same as your subject.
     
  9. hootpie

    hootpie New Member

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    I learn best with examples so can you give me an example of a typical situation where you'd use each of the metering modes?

    Spot
    Partial
    Evaluative
    Center-weighted
     
  10. derekOT

    derekOT New Member

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    example of spot metering:
    if you are shooting a bride, you want to expose for the highlights so that you don't end up with overexposure
    so the brightest part of the scene is the white dress and you will not want to overexpose it
    one way to get proper exposure is to spot meter the dress (+1 1/3) - (+1 2/3) positive EV. This will expose the dress properly and everything else should fall into place
     
  11. PackingMyBags

    PackingMyBags New Member

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    Can you explain this...please.:hs:
     
  12. asdfbunk

    asdfbunk A Member OT Supporter

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    I might be wrong about the wedding dress, but I'm assuming since white reflects light, the background will be underexposed to all hell, and exposing for something in between (just before you blow out parts of the dress, but not too dark on the background) might give you something to work with in PP. I've never shot something like this.

    Unless you mean the grey card? Some people stick those in the environment (with fixed lighting) expose on that and you should get the proper exposure every time. It also helps with white balance.
     
  13. PackingMyBags

    PackingMyBags New Member

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    Sorry, i meant the grey card. I keep hearing about people using it, but dont know its process that well. Obviously you dont leave it in the frame when you go to shoot. I know this sounds retarded, but what is the proper procedure of using said grey card. Thanks.
     
  14. asdfbunk

    asdfbunk A Member OT Supporter

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    I always just assumed you spot meter on the grey card that's in your scene, then keep the exposure at that and recompose the shot.
     

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