GUN do you need a manufactures license

Discussion in 'On Topic' started by hsmith, Dec 12, 2008.

  1. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    124,477
    Likes Received:
    569
    Location:
    Your mother.
    to make firearm parts, like magazines?
     
  2. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    5,709
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NKY
    Not unless you are making receivers, or building complete firearms.
     
  3. 2L Bunny

    2L Bunny "It's only a Rabbit"

    Joined:
    May 18, 2001
    Messages:
    1,673
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    OR
    Unless you're building a complete firearm for yourself.
     
  4. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    124,477
    Likes Received:
    569
    Location:
    Your mother.
    sweet

    found this as well:

    http://www.atf.gov/firearms/firearmstech/081508manufacturing-of-firearms.pdf
    Text of File:
    U.S. Department of Justice
    Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco,
    Firearms and Explosives
    Firearms Technology Branch
    August 15, 2008
    Martinsburg, West Virginia 25405
    www.atf.gov
    Manufacturing of Firearms
    Below are examples of operations performed on firearms and guidance as to
    whether or not such operations would be considered manufacturing under the
    Gun Control Act (GCA). These examples do not address the question of whether
    the operations are considered manufacturing for purposes of determining
    excise tax. Any questions concerning the payment of excise tax should be
    directed to the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau, U.S. Department of
    the Treasury.
    Generally, a person should obtain a license as a manufacturer of firearms if
    the person:
    1) is performing operations that create firearms or alter firearms (in the
    case of alterations, the work is not being performed at the request of
    customers, rather the person who is altering the firearms is purchasing them
    making the changes, and then reselling them);
    2) is performing the operations as a regular course of business or trade;
    and
    3) is performing the operations for the purpose of sale or distribution of
    the firearms.
    1. A company produces a quantity of firearm frames or receivers for sale
    to customers who will assemble firearms. The company is engaged in the
    business of manufacturing firearms and should be licensed as a manufacturer
    of firearms.
    2. A company produces frames or receivers for another company that
    assembles and sells the firearms. Both companies are engaged in the
    business of manufacturing firearms,
    and each should be licensed as a manufacturer of firearms.
    3. A company provides frames to a subcontractor company that performs
    machining operations on the frames and returns the frames to the original
    company that assembles and sells the completed firearms. Both companies are
    engaged in the business of manufacturing firearms and should be licensed as
    manufacturers of firearms.
    4. A company produces barrels for firearms and sells the barrels to
    another company that assembles and sells complete firearms. Because barrels
    are not firearms, the company that manufactures the barrels is not a
    manufacturer of firearms. The company that assembles and sells the firearms
    should be licensed as a manufacturer of firearms.
    5. A company receives firearm frames from individual customers, attaches
    stocks and barrels, and returns the firearms to the customers for the
    customers’ personal use. The operations performed on the firearms were not
    for the purpose of sale or distribution. The company should be licensed as a
    dealer or gunsmith, not as a manufacturer of firearms.
    6. A company acquires one receiver, assembles one firearm, and sells the
    firearm. The company is not manufacturing firearms as a regular course of
    trade or business and is not engaged in the business of manufacturing
    firearms. This company does not need to be licensed as a manufacturer.
    7. An individual acquires frames or receivers and assembles firearms for
    his or her personal use, not for sale or distribution. The individual is
    not manufacturing firearms for sale or distribution and is not required to
    be a licensed manufacturer.
    8. A gunsmith regularly buys military-type firearms, Mausers, etc., and
    sporterizes” them for resale. The gunsmith is in the business of
    manufacturing firearms and should be licensed as a manufacturer.
    9. A gunsmith buys semiautomatic pistols and modifies the slides to
    accept a new style of sights. The sights are not usually sold with these
    firearms and do not attach to the existing mounting openings. The gunsmith
    offers these firearms for sale. This would be considered the manufacturing
    of firearms, and the gunsmith should be licensed as a manufacturer.
    10. A gunsmith buys government model pistols and installs “drop-in”
    precision trigger parts or other “drop-in parts” for the purpose of resale.
    This would be considered the manufacturing of firearms, as the gunsmith is
    purchasing the firearms, modifying the firearms, and selling them. The
    gunsmith should be licensed as a manufacturer.
    11. A gunsmith buys surplus military rifles, bends the bolts to accept a
    scope, and then drills the receivers for a scope base. The gunsmith offers
    these firearms for sale. This would be considered the manufacturing of
    firearms, and the gunsmith should be licensed as a manufacturer.
    12. A gunsmith buys surplus military rifles or pistols and removes the
    stocks, adds new stocks or pistol grips, cleans the firearms, then sends the
    firearms to a separate contractor for bluing. These firearms are then sold
    to the public. This would be considered manufacturing of firearms, and the
    gunsmith should be licensed as a manufacturer.
    13. A company purchases surplus firearms, cleans the firearms, then
    offers them for sale to the public. The company does not need to be
    licensed as a manufacturer.
    14. A company produces firearms or firearm receivers and sends the firearm/receivers out for colorizing (bluing, camouflaging, phosphating, or plating) and/or heat treating. Do the companies performing the colorization and/or heat treating need to be licensed as manufacturers, and are the companies required to place their markings on the firearm? ATF has determined that both colorization and heat treating of firearms are manufacturing processes. The companies performing the processes are required to be licensed as manufacturers. If the companies providing colorization and/or heat treating have not received variances to adopt the original manufacturer’s markings, they would be required to place their own markings on any firearm on which they perform the manufacturing process of colorization and/or heat treating.
     
  5. sprite

    sprite Active Member

    Joined:
    May 20, 2003
    Messages:
    2,967
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    MI, USA
    you gonna run some numbers bro?
     
  6. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    124,477
    Likes Received:
    569
    Location:
    Your mother.
    rofl
     
  7. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    5,709
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NKY
    Should have clarified..... When doing things for money (resale), involving firearms (receivers) is where you run into problems.


    I'm interested in a 100rd magazine that will fit into a 140mm USPSA gauge, and still offer me a similar weight/feel/balance with my CZ's. Mind running the numbers and getting back to me on that?
     
  8. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    124,477
    Likes Received:
    569
    Location:
    Your mother.
    want a suppressor on it too?
     
  9. phrozenlikwid

    phrozenlikwid New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2007
    Messages:
    5,709
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    NKY

    Why, yes, I would actually.

    I forsee great things, if you continue the forward thinking that you just shown.
     
  10. GlobeGuy

    GlobeGuy New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 14, 2004
    Messages:
    2,974
    Likes Received:
    0
    You gonna start making your own magazines? :eek3:
     
  11. yar1182

    yar1182 New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2008
    Messages:
    4,852
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Ventura California
    Man you miss a lot if you need a 100 round mag. Would think a 36 round mag would get you through every uspsa stage that was 32 round legal. The suppressor you also not be picked up by the shot timer which I guess would give you a very good time!
     
  12. hsmith

    hsmith OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2002
    Messages:
    124,477
    Likes Received:
    569
    Location:
    Your mother.
    i think i might have an idea for a 22LR drum that doesn't suck :o

    i am going to autocad it and see if it looks feasible - there is one thing i can't wrap my head around that might be the lynch pin :o
     
  13. spankaveli

    spankaveli OT Supporter

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2002
    Messages:
    16,466
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    LA. State, not City.
    no
    yes
     

Share This Page